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Thinner alternative to drywall?



 
 
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  #21  
Old January 11th 12, 03:39 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 3,241
Default Thinner alternative to drywall?

On Jan 10, 8:22*pm, TimR wrote:
On Jan 10, 5:41*pm, Ed Pawlowski wrote:





On Tue, 10 Jan 2012 08:40:57 -0800 (PST), Bill Ventura


wrote:
I'm changing out my kitchen ovens and the new one
needs an additional 3/8 to 1/2" of side clearance. *It is
a sheetrocked wall, 1/2". * *Because it will be hidden
doesn't matter about looks. *The oven is rated to be
installed in wood cabinets with essentially zero
clearance. *Some options that come to mind:


1 - Remove the drywall and trim the studs down by 1/2"
over the full height of the wall using a router? *Other ideas?
Then re-drywall. The wall is non-load bearing.


That is a good option. *In spite of the zero clearance rating, I'd
like to see sheetrock next to my ovens and continue to meet fire
codes.


Or, since this is a very small area:
Remove old drywall.
Cut new drywall to size to fit between studs and flush with them.
Tape and joint compound, paint the wall.

It will be impossible to tell the entire space is not drywall. *You
haven't compromised any of the strength, and you've put back much of
the fire protection.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


But you do have wood exposed to the oven. Sheet metal is better than
that, I would cut back the studs and then redrywall to meet any fire
code questions. You wouldn't want a fire and then have insurance
denied because there was no drywall.
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  #22  
Old January 11th 12, 03:51 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 221
Default Thinner alternative to drywall?



For Idea 1, maybe another option would be to: remove the existing sheetrock;
sister 2x3 studs next to the existing 2x4 studs; cut the existing 2x4's down
to the level of the 2x3's with a circular saw and/or Sawzall; the
re-sheetrock with 1/2-inch sheetrock. Or, if you have access to both sides
if the existing wall, maybe tear it down and rebuild it with 2x3's and
sheetrock both sides with 1/2-inch sheetrock.


A variation is to remove the old drywall and add your "sisters" so that
they are 1/2" below the studs. Cut the new drywall to fit between the
old studs.

On the finished wall you wall have 1.75" of wood and 14.25" of drywall.
The OP can either paint everything the same color or use a different
color on the wood.

Alternatively, set the drywall base 1" behind the studs. If 2x3
"sisters" are used, the OP could use 5/8" drywall. Small sections of
drywall might "flex" a bit so the extra thickness might be helpful.



  #23  
Old January 11th 12, 03:59 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 221
Default Thinner alternative to drywall?



One of the biggest rationales for using drywall is its fire retardant
capability. Bear this in mind as you search for a substitute.


Good point.

"Sisters on the drywall with drywall in between will make it more
difficult to ignite the 2x4 studs over being exposed. Perhaps not as
good a 1/2" over the studs but ...

One reason drywall resists fire is that the gypsum retails a heck of a
lot of water. The fire has to "dry out" the gypsum before it can get
much above the boiling temperature of water and that's WAY below what it
takes to set the wood on fire.

N.B.: "Fire Resistant" safes often use gypsum in the space between the
outer wall and the inner wall. Stuff a wall cavity with drywall sheets
would provide some fire protection.

ALSO, there are fire retardant paints that might be applied to the wood.

Like it or not, in a typical house/office the fuel usually comes from
the belongings of the owner/tenants. Books, paper, and most furniture
and office equipment can provide fuel.



  #24  
Old January 11th 12, 03:18 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 402
Default Thinner alternative to drywall?

On Jan 10, 11:40*am, Bill Ventura wrote:
I'm changing out my kitchen ovens and the new one
needs an additional 3/8 to 1/2" of side clearance. *It is
a sheetrocked wall, 1/2". * *Because it will be hidden
doesn't matter about looks. *The oven is rated to be
installed in wood cabinets with essentially zero
clearance.


Don't forget that you need clearance to slide the oven into its space.
I'm not sure of your exact scenario, but if this oven is against a
long wall, this will be an issue. You can't just remove the drywall
from where the oven is going to be, and expect it to slide in there.
  #25  
Old January 11th 12, 05:43 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 60
Default Thinner alternative to drywall?

On Jan 10, 10:36*pm, "hr(bob) "
wrote:
On Jan 10, 11:11*am, bob haller wrote:





On Jan 10, 11:40*am, Bill Ventura wrote:


I'm changing out my kitchen ovens and the new one
needs an additional 3/8 to 1/2" of side clearance. *It is
a sheetrocked wall, 1/2". * *Because it will be hidden
doesn't matter about looks. *The oven is rated to be
installed in wood cabinets with essentially zero
clearance. *Some options that come to mind:


1 - Remove the drywall and trim the studs down by 1/2"
over the full height of the wall using a router? *Other ideas?
Then re-drywall. The wall is non-load bearing.


2 - Just leave the one section of hidden wall where the
ovens are without drywall. *It's just a short wall, not open
to anywhere above or below and will never be seen.


3 - Same as two but use sheetmetal to cover the studs.


4 - Other ideas? *Is there some other product that
is thin and can be used instead of sheetrock for
something like this?


Thanks for any input!


replace 1/2 inch drywall with 5/8ths- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


He wants thinner, not thicker

_____________
Bob probably meant to type 3/8". I cant speak for him, but
personally I am severely dyslexic and would have made the same mistake
a dozen times. lol!

CC
  #26  
Old January 11th 12, 05:53 PM posted to alt.home.repair
Ron
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Posts: 58
Default Thinner alternative to drywall?

John Gilmer wrote:
For Idea 1, maybe another option would be to: remove the existing
sheetrock; sister 2x3 studs next to the existing 2x4 studs; cut the
existing 2x4's down to the level of the 2x3's with a circular saw
and/or Sawzall; the re-sheetrock with 1/2-inch sheetrock. Or, if
you have access to both sides if the existing wall, maybe tear it
down and rebuild it with 2x3's and sheetrock both sides with
1/2-inch sheetrock.


A variation is to remove the old drywall and add your "sisters" so
that they are 1/2" below the studs. Cut the new drywall to fit
between the old studs. ...,


That's an interesting idea. It would be easier than my idea, and it would
leave him with an enclosed wall next to the oven. Also, with the idea that
I had suggested, I forgot to include that the OP would have to cut back the
top plate and bottom plate, which may not be to easy to do.


  #27  
Old January 11th 12, 07:59 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1,738
Default Thinner alternative to drywall?

On 1/11/2012 9:43 AM, ChrisCoaster wrote:
On Jan 10, 10:36 pm, "hr(bob)
wrote:
On Jan 10, 11:11 am, bob wrote:





On Jan 10, 11:40 am, Bill wrote:


I'm changing out my kitchen ovens and the new one
needs an additional 3/8 to 1/2" of side clearance. It is
a sheetrocked wall, 1/2". Because it will be hidden
doesn't matter about looks. The oven is rated to be
installed in wood cabinets with essentially zero
clearance. Some options that come to mind:


1 - Remove the drywall and trim the studs down by 1/2"
over the full height of the wall using a router? Other ideas?
Then re-drywall. The wall is non-load bearing.


2 - Just leave the one section of hidden wall where the
ovens are without drywall. It's just a short wall, not open
to anywhere above or below and will never be seen.


3 - Same as two but use sheetmetal to cover the studs.


4 - Other ideas? Is there some other product that
is thin and can be used instead of sheetrock for
something like this?


Thanks for any input!


replace 1/2 inch drywall with 5/8ths- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


He wants thinner, not thicker

_____________
Bob probably meant to type 3/8". I cant speak for him, but
personally I am severely dyslexic and would have made the same mistake
a dozen times. lol!

CC


even if so, that still would have only gained ONE EIGHTH inch. Not to
mention there is no such thing as 3/8" drywall readily available
anymore. Knowing bob, he was spouting off about fire protection again.
**** he knows nothing about.

--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  #28  
Old January 13th 12, 09:07 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 3,587
Default Thinner alternative to drywall?

On Tue, 10 Jan 2012 08:40:57 -0800 (PST), Bill Ventura
wrote:

I'm changing out my kitchen ovens and the new one
needs an additional 3/8 to 1/2" of side clearance. It is
a sheetrocked wall, 1/2". Because it will be hidden
doesn't matter about looks. The oven is rated to be
installed in wood cabinets with essentially zero
clearance. Some options that come to mind:

1 - Remove the drywall and trim the studs down by 1/2"
over the full height of the wall using a router? Other ideas?
Then re-drywall. The wall is non-load bearing.

2 - Just leave the one section of hidden wall where the
ovens are without drywall. It's just a short wall, not open
to anywhere above or below and will never be seen.


2.5 Screw some little pieces of wood 1/2" in from the surface and
attach the drywall to them. Cut the drywall to be just smaller than
the opening.

3 - Same as two but use sheetmetal to cover the studs.

4 - Other ideas? Is there some other product that
is thin and can be used instead of sheetrock for
something like this?


Saran Wrap. Get the white kind.

Thanks for any input!


 




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