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Rural Irrigation/Remote Faucets Methods ??



 
 
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  #11  
Old June 30th 11, 02:56 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair,rec.gardens
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Posts: 1,738
Default Rural Irrigation/Remote Faucets Methods ??

On 6/29/2011 6:30 PM, James Nipper wrote:
I have a vacation property in the mountains, of about six acres, two acres
of which are cleared and developed. I have areas away from the house area
in which I need water access for watering plants, flowers, etc. Ideally, I
would love to have about three faucets in areas that are up to about 400
feet away from the house.

I can purchase 500 to 600 feet of hoses, and with the use of "T's" add
several branches (hoses) to allow me to water in several selected areas.
But, if I use high quality hoses, this would be pretty expensive, and it all
seems so "temporary."

I am wondering if it would be more economical to run a main line of about
500 feet, using some sort of plastic pipe (cannot remember the name of the
current most common), and then run my hose branches from that ? (The main
line would have to lay on the ground, through the woods). Whatever I use,
I need to be able to drain the line during winters, but I suppose I could
get fittings for this equipped with a drain screw or valve or something.

Any ideas of what I should look for, or use ? Any general ideas of how to
accomplish what I am trying to do ?

thanks !!

James



you could use PEX or PVC, but both are weakened by long term exposure to
UV (sun) So you'd have to paint them with some light colored exterior
latex after laying them out. I'd suspect they'd give you 5 or 6 years
service without paint. (my experience) then they start to get brittle.

--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
Ads
  #12  
Old June 30th 11, 03:22 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair,rec.gardens
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Posts: 5,190
Default Rural Irrigation/Remote Faucets Methods ??

Stormin Mormon wrote:
80 cents a foot? That's more pricey than garden hose?


A 500 foot garden hose isn't going to pass much water.


  #13  
Old June 30th 11, 03:27 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair,rec.gardens
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Posts: 5,190
Default Rural Irrigation/Remote Faucets Methods ??

Stormin Mormon wrote:
First thing comes to mind, is sunlight and the UV rays. So,
what you use should be UV resistant.

White PVC tubing might work for a while. The cost of
fittings might add up. Typically sold in 10 foot lengths,
and the tubing is relatively rigid.


White PVC will be weakened by UV. Works great buried.


The new "Pex" stuff they sell for indoor water tubing may
work, but not sure how UV resistant it is.

Most Pex is easily damaged by UV.


They also sell some grey tubing for electrical conduit,
which might be more UV resistant, but not sure it's used for
outdoor water.


It's not rated for that.

Which brings us back to black poly pipe.


As to winter, may be able to to blow it out with compressed
air, and leave it dry.


OR install drain valves in the low spots.


  #14  
Old June 30th 11, 05:07 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair,rec.gardens
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Posts: 11
Default Rural Irrigation/Remote Faucets Methods ??


"FarmI" ask@itshall be given wrote in message
u...
"James Nipper" wrote in message
net...
I have a vacation property in the mountains, of about six acres, two
acres of which are cleared and developed. I have areas away from the
house area in which I need water access for watering plants, flowers, etc.
Ideally, I would love to have about three faucets in areas that are up to
about 400 feet away from the house.

I can purchase 500 to 600 feet of hoses, and with the use of "T's" add
several branches (hoses) to allow me to water in several selected areas.
But, if I use high quality hoses, this would be pretty expensive, and it
all seems so "temporary."

I am wondering if it would be more economical to run a main line of about
500 feet, using some sort of plastic pipe (cannot remember the name of
the current most common), and then run my hose branches from that ? (The
main line would have to lay on the ground, through the woods).
Whatever I use, I need to be able to drain the line during winters, but I
suppose I could get fittings for this equipped with a drain screw or
valve or something.

Any ideas of what I should look for, or use ? Any general ideas of how
to accomplish what I am trying to do ?


I don't know what country you're in but I use polypipe to take water all
over the place and since a lot of it has now been in place for up to 20
years, I don't consider it to be temporary.

I use 2 inch, 1 inch and three quarter inch. Very little of this is laid
underground except for perhaps 20 ft of the 2 inch stuff that forms a main
artery. Some of the 1 inch and three quarters of an inch stuff has become
covered over the eyars as drebris drops on top of it. I have a main 2
inch line coming from our big tank (cistern in USian) and then I run one
inch and 3/4 inch withint the veg garden and in the orchard and down to
the chook pen and also from another 2 inch pipe down at the pond at the
bottom of the garden.

Lay it out on a hot summers day when the sun helps it to lie out better
and carry some hot water to do all the connections and it's an easy job.
One hint would be that if you manage to find little sprinkler heads that
you like, buy a truck load. I am reduced to 2 heads of my favourites.


Agree with the above. For what he wants to do, 1" poly pipe should work.
It's readily available at HD, Lowes, plumbing supply, online, etc. and
reasonably priced.


  #15  
Old June 30th 11, 05:12 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair,rec.gardens
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Posts: 57
Default Rural Irrigation/Remote Faucets Methods ??

On Thu, 30 Jun 2011 07:22:08 -0700, "Bob F"
wrote:

Stormin Mormon wrote:
80 cents a foot? That's more pricey than garden hose?


A 500 foot garden hose isn't going to pass much water.


Why not? Hose length has no bearing on water volume, only diameter
matters.
  #16  
Old June 30th 11, 05:32 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair,rec.gardens
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Posts: 57
Default Rural Irrigation/Remote Faucets Methods ??

On Thu, 30 Jun 2011 07:53:20 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
wrote:

If you have a garden tractor and trailer of some kind. A 12
volt "spot sprayer" from Harbor Freight may make more sense
than running water tubing from the house.
http://www.harborfreight.com/12-volt...ayer-9583.html
Fill it at the house, drive it out in the trailer, and spray
with the garden tractor motor running to supply power.


That's what I do during dry spells, hitch my Agra-Fab cart to a
tractor and haul water in a poly tank or in a couple dozen 5 gallon
contractor buckets filled about 3/4s... only takes about a minute to
fill each bucket if I remove the nozzle from my 5/8" garden hose. I
rarely use the poly tank, the buckets are easier as I can more easily
guage how much water each plant gets (1 bucket is usually sufficient).
I water newly planted saplings and shrubs during dry spells, maybe 2-3
times a season as most years there's plenty of rain. I think it's
actually mentally retarded to build an irrigation system as the OP,
etal indicate unless it's a fairly arid clime or for a plant nursery
business or someone has more dollars than brain cells. Plastic
buckets are cheap, usually free... just got three more buckets today
taht's be ready to go once I empty the cat litter... I have more than
I can count and they nest so take very little room. If you drill a
3/16" hole on the side near the bottom of the bucket it will drip
water for a plant for several hours.
  #17  
Old June 30th 11, 09:01 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair,rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,356
Default Rural Irrigation/Remote Faucets Methods ??


"James Nipper" wrote in message
net...
I have a vacation property in the mountains, of about six acres, two
acres of which are cleared and developed. I have areas away from the
house area in which I need water access for watering plants, flowers,
etc. Ideally, I would love to have about three faucets in areas that are
up to about 400 feet away from the house.

I can purchase 500 to 600 feet of hoses, and with the use of "T's"
add several branches (hoses) to allow me to water in several selected
areas. But, if I use high quality hoses, this would be pretty expensive,
and it all seems so "temporary."

I am wondering if it would be more economical to run a main line of
about 500 feet, using some sort of plastic pipe (cannot remember the
name of the current most common), and then run my hose branches from
that ? (The main line would have to lay on the ground, through the
woods). Whatever I use, I need to be able to drain the line during
winters, but I suppose I could get fittings for this equipped with a
drain screw or valve or something.

Any ideas of what I should look for, or use ? Any general ideas of how
to accomplish what I am trying to do ?




I agree that poly pipe is the least expensive course of action. 500 foot of
3/4" is only about $65 at this site:
http://www.submatic.com/catalog/poly-flex-hose.html

Pex would cost a lot more. Your local prices might vary a bit but should
still be well under a hundred.

I don't have a clue as to the UV effect on poly pipe. Buried it lasts for a
very long time. A water line I installed in 1969 is still in use today.


--
Colbyt
Please come visit http://www.househomerepair.com


  #18  
Old June 30th 11, 10:24 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair,rec.gardens
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Posts: 5,190
Default Rural Irrigation/Remote Faucets Methods ??

Brooklyn1 wrote:
On Thu, 30 Jun 2011 07:22:08 -0700, "Bob F"
wrote:

Stormin Mormon wrote:
80 cents a foot? That's more pricey than garden hose?


A 500 foot garden hose isn't going to pass much water.


Why not? Hose length has no bearing on water volume, only diameter
matters.


Is that your final answer?

Wrong again.


  #19  
Old June 30th 11, 11:02 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair,rec.gardens
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Posts: 10,563
Default Rural Irrigation/Remote Faucets Methods ??

Yeah, and that also describes my prostate.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


"Bob F" wrote in message
...
Stormin Mormon wrote:
80 cents a foot? That's more pricey than garden hose?


A 500 foot garden hose isn't going to pass much water.



  #20  
Old June 30th 11, 11:05 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair,rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,563
Default Rural Irrigation/Remote Faucets Methods ??

When I was in the fire service, we learned that both length
and diameter matters. Smaller hose increases pressure drop,
usually measured in psi drop per 100 feet of length.

500 foot hose has 5 times the pressure drop of 100 foot
hose. In this case, both size matters, and length matters.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


"Brooklyn1" Gravesend1 wrote in message
...


A 500 foot garden hose isn't going to pass much water.


Why not? Hose length has no bearing on water volume, only
diameter
matters.


 




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