A DIY & home improvement forum. DIYbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DIYbanter forum » Do - it - Yourself » Home Repair
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Home Repair (alt.home.repair) For all homeowners and DIYers with many experienced tradesmen. Solve your toughest home fix-it problems.

How Do You "TIN" a soldering iron?



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old November 29th 10, 06:26 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default How Do You "TIN" a soldering iron?

How do you know when your soldering iron is tinned?
I keep mine plugged in for 5-10 minutes then when I try tin it, the
solder beads up and just drips offs. It doesn't seem to "wet" the
tip.
Is it suppose to wet the tip of the soldering iron?

I'm using non lead solder, 95%Sn, 5% Sb (Tin/Antimony).
Rosin core.

Also, when 1 solder two wires together, I twist the wires together,
then hold the iron to one side of the wire and hold the solder to the
opposite site. The wire should get hot and soak up the solder, right?
I've been practicing but it seems to be hit or miss so far.

Bonnie
Ads
  #4  
Old November 29th 10, 01:34 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,216
Default How Do You "TIN" a soldering iron?

On Nov 29, 5:26*am, wrote:
How do you know when your soldering iron is tinned?
I keep mine plugged in *for 5-10 minutes then when I try tin it, the
solder beads up and just drips offs. *It doesn't seem to "wet" the
tip.
Is it suppose to wet the tip of the soldering iron?

I'm using non lead solder, 95%Sn, 5% Sb (Tin/Antimony).
Rosin core.

Also, when 1 solder two wires together, I twist the wires together,
then hold the iron to one side of the wire and hold the solder to the
opposite site. *The wire should get hot and soak up the solder, right?
I've been practicing but it seems to be hit or miss so far.

Bonnie


to tin your soldering iron you need to clean the crap off and put flux
on it and dab bit of solder on. It will spread on the tip giving a
shiny appearance. After a while, it oxydises & you have to repeat the
process. The benifit is that you get a rapid heat transferr fron the
iron to the solder and the job/workpiece.
Solders with a high tin content works best but are expensive. Some
solders have no lead in at all, they are harder to deal with I have
found.
There are lots of different fluxes for different metals and types of
solder, you need to get the one recommended. Sometimes they are
incompatible, sometimes not.
  #5  
Old November 29th 10, 02:14 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 198
Default How Do You "TIN" a soldering iron?

On Nov 29, 12:26*am, wrote:
How do you know when your soldering iron is tinned?
I keep mine plugged in *for 5-10 minutes then when I try tin it, the
solder beads up and just drips offs. *It doesn't seem to "wet" the
tip.
Is it suppose to wet the tip of the soldering iron?

I'm using non lead solder, 95%Sn, 5% Sb (Tin/Antimony).
Rosin core.

Also, when 1 solder two wires together, I twist the wires together,
then hold the iron to one side of the wire and hold the solder to the
opposite site. *The wire should get hot and soak up the solder, right?
I've been practicing but it seems to be hit or miss so far.

Bonnie


As one beginner to another.....

First, I don't know much if anything about soldering, but I do solder
wires wires together pretty often.

Second, I only solder either aluminum or copper wires, which are easy.

Third, the advise you have received here is good, but they didn't
mention that the wire has to be clean too. If the wire is old and
oxidized, it has to be clipped off or cleaned too.

Fourth, use a resin core solder.

Fifth, I scape off my tips with a knife. I have even used a bench
grinder to grind them back to a point. Then I heat up the iron and
melt solder on the tip which helps clean it, then wipe off the excess
solder.

Hope these little tips help.

Hank ~~~assuming it is a Pencil type soldering iron

  #8  
Old November 29th 10, 04:56 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,054
Default How Do You "TIN" a soldering iron?

In article ,
"HeyBub" wrote:

wrote:
How do you know when your soldering iron is tinned?
I keep mine plugged in for 5-10 minutes then when I try tin it, the
solder beads up and just drips offs. It doesn't seem to "wet" the
tip.
Is it suppose to wet the tip of the soldering iron?

I'm using non lead solder, 95%Sn, 5% Sb (Tin/Antimony).
Rosin core.

Also, when 1 solder two wires together, I twist the wires together,
then hold the iron to one side of the wire and hold the solder to the
opposite site. The wire should get hot and soak up the solder, right?
I've been practicing but it seems to be hit or miss so far.


As others have said, the solder won't stick to crud. Follow these steps for
your abused iron.

1. Using a file or sandpaper, abrade off the crap from the tip of your iron
until the tip is shiny base metal (either copper or steel).

2. Plug in the iron and, when it gets hot, cover the tip with solder.

3. Periodically during your soldering project, drag your iron's tip over a
damp sponge.

4. When the iron's tip turns black and can't be returned to shiny via the
sponge business, repeat steps 1 & 2.

5. You are correct when you twist the wires together. Soldering is an
ELECTRICAL connection, not a mechanical one. Depending on solder to hold two
items together is ultimately futile.


Nuts. OP, do not sand the tip. Throw it away and buy new. The base metal
of the tip will not tin with solder, only the plating will. Once the
plating is shot, it's shot.

Solder is a mechanical *and* electrical connection. Twisting is a great
idea, but solder is used all damn day long as the only mechanical bond
between items.
  #9  
Old November 29th 10, 05:32 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,216
Default How Do You "TIN" a soldering iron?

On Nov 29, 3:41*pm, homer wrote:
On Mon, 29 Nov 2010 00:26:05 -0500, wrote:
How do you know when your soldering iron is tinned?
I keep mine plugged in *for 5-10 minutes then when I try tin it, the
solder beads up and just drips offs. *It doesn't seem to "wet" the
tip.
Is it suppose to wet the tip of the soldering iron?


I'm using non lead solder, 95%Sn, 5% Sb (Tin/Antimony).
Rosin core.


Also, when 1 solder two wires together, I twist the wires together,
then hold the iron to one side of the wire and hold the solder to the
opposite site. *The wire should get hot and soak up the solder, right?
I've been practicing but it seems to be hit or miss so far.


Bonnie


Does no one use Sal Ammoniac to keep their soldering tips clean
anymore?- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Ho! That's going back a bit! But viable. It's used mostly for
soldering tinplate.
  #10  
Old November 29th 10, 05:42 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,216
Default How Do You "TIN" a soldering iron?

On Nov 29, 3:56*pm, Smitty Two wrote:
In article ,





*"HeyBub" wrote:
wrote:
How do you know when your soldering iron is tinned?
I keep mine plugged in *for 5-10 minutes then when I try tin it, the
solder beads up and just drips offs. *It doesn't seem to "wet" the
tip.
Is it suppose to wet the tip of the soldering iron?


I'm using non lead solder, 95%Sn, 5% Sb (Tin/Antimony).
Rosin core.


Also, when 1 solder two wires together, I twist the wires together,
then hold the iron to one side of the wire and hold the solder to the
opposite site. *The wire should get hot and soak up the solder, right?
I've been practicing but it seems to be hit or miss so far.


As others have said, the solder won't stick to crud. Follow these steps for
your abused iron.


1. Using a file or sandpaper, abrade off the crap from the tip of your iron
until the tip is shiny base metal (either copper or steel).


2. Plug in the iron and, when it gets hot, cover the tip with solder.


3. Periodically during your soldering project, drag your iron's tip over a
damp sponge.


4. When the iron's tip turns black and can't be returned to shiny via the
sponge business, repeat steps 1 & 2.


5. You are correct when you twist the wires together. Soldering is an
ELECTRICAL connection, not a mechanical one. Depending on solder to hold two
items together is ultimately futile.


Nuts. OP, do not sand the tip. Throw it away and buy new. The base metal
of the tip will not tin with solder, only the plating will. Once the
plating is shot, it's shot.

Solder is a mechanical *and* electrical connection. Twisting is a great
idea, but solder is used all damn day long as the only mechanical bond
between items.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


If the "base metal" is copper you can tin it no problem as long and as
many times as you like. Plated tips are a relatively recent invention
as are disposable tips. I have a fifty year old soldering iron. I
have some even older heated in a gas flame or on the fire. All solid
lumps of copper. Soldering goes back, many hundreds of years maybe
even thousands. All are viable systems. You could use them today.
It was one of the earliest metal bonding techniques.
All these bits of pizaz are just for convenience or the idle.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Can I use a clothes iron in place of "seam iron" on carpet? blueman Home Repair 8 September 20th 13 02:14 PM
I am looking for a local source for "Rockwool" / "Mineral Wool" /"Safe & Sound" / "AFB" jtpr Home Repair 3 June 10th 10 07:27 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2004-2014 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.