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How to clean out compressor tank



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 4th 10, 01:52 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default How to clean out compressor tank

Hi, I just bought a large air tank on ebay to use with my air
compressor. The guy said I should wash it out though before I use it.
I'm kinda worried about what kind of chemicals might be in it since it
came from an industrialized area. Is there anything I can use to
totally clean it out? Should I just use normal dish soap or is there
something better?

Here is the tank:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...=STRK:MEWNX:IT

Thanks,
Michael

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  #2  
Old September 4th 10, 02:05 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 33
Default How to clean out compressor tank

On Sat, 04 Sep 2010 05:52:40 -0700, mshaffer wrote:

Hi, I just bought a large air tank on ebay to use with my air
compressor. The guy said I should wash it out though before I use it.
I'm kinda worried about what kind of chemicals might be in it since it
came from an industrialized area. Is there anything I can use to totally
clean it out? Should I just use normal dish soap or is there something
better?

Here is the tank:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?

ViewItem&item=200447946127&ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:I T

Thanks,
Michael


If it was used for compressed air it shouldn't need cleaned out. Better
ask the seller what was in the tank.
  #3  
Old September 4th 10, 02:12 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,069
Default How to clean out compressor tank

I wouldn't worry about it one way or the other. If you are super
worried, remove the automatic bleeder on the bottom of the tank
and install a ball valve or similar. Pressure the tank until the
regulator on the compressor is happy. Close off the compressor.
Open that bottom ball valve and blow down. If you are worried
about mold, mildew, unknown bugs, etc., make up some bleach
water - about 5 water to 1 bleach, empty the tank, pour in a
gallon of the mixture, shake vigorously (yes, I'm kidding), and
pressurize and blow down.

I can't imagine anything in the tank being unsafe. You will be
compressing your own "dirty air", I doubt that the steel tank is
holding much in the way of residual nasties.

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DanG
Keep the whole world singing . . .


"mshaffer" wrote in message
...
Hi, I just bought a large air tank on ebay to use with my air
compressor. The guy said I should wash it out though before I
use it.
I'm kinda worried about what kind of chemicals might be in it
since it
came from an industrialized area. Is there anything I can use to
totally clean it out? Should I just use normal dish soap or is
there
something better?

Here is the tank:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...=STRK:MEWNX:IT

Thanks,
Michael



  #4  
Old September 4th 10, 02:40 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,913
Default How to clean out compressor tank

On 9/4/2010 8:52 AM, mshaffer wrote:
Hi, I just bought a large air tank on ebay to use with my air
compressor. The guy said I should wash it out though before I use it.
I'm kinda worried about what kind of chemicals might be in it since it
came from an industrialized area. Is there anything I can use to
totally clean it out? Should I just use normal dish soap or is there
something better?

Here is the tank:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...=STRK:MEWNX:IT

Thanks,
Michael

Why not ask the guy why he told you you need to wash it out?
  #5  
Old September 4th 10, 04:43 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,030
Default How to clean out compressor tank


"mshaffer" wrote in message
...
Hi, I just bought a large air tank on ebay to use with my air
compressor. The guy said I should wash it out though before I use it.
I'm kinda worried about what kind of chemicals might be in it since it
came from an industrialized area. Is there anything I can use to
totally clean it out? Should I just use normal dish soap or is there
something better?

Here is the tank:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...=STRK:MEWNX:IT

Thanks,
Michael


There should be NO chemicals in it. Air tanks hold air (and moisture) and
nothing should have ever been in it. There may be rust inside.
There may be some oil residue if the tank was downstream of a crappy
compressor with no separator. If you want to clean that out, any detergent
that cuts oil will work.

How old is the tank? Is there an inspection tag on it? In some states (and
insurance companies) the air tanks have to be inspected every two years to
insure the integrity of the metal. In MA, where I work, the tanks will also
have a state tag on them. After the initial state inspection, the insurance
company can inspect them. In the old days, the inspector used to look
inside and tap around it. Today, they use an ultrasound device.



  #6  
Old September 4th 10, 06:31 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default How to clean out compressor tank

On Sep 4, 11:43*am, "Ed Pawlowski" wrote:
"mshaffer" wrote in message

...

Hi, I just bought a large air tank on ebay to use with my air
compressor. The guy said I should wash it out though before I use it.
I'm kinda worried about what kind of chemicals might be in it since it
came from an industrialized area. Is there anything I can use to
totally clean it out? Should I just use normal dish soap or is there
something better?


Here is the tank:


http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...47946127&ssPag....


Thanks,
Michael


There should be NO chemicals in it. *Air tanks hold air (and moisture) and
nothing should have ever been in it. *There may be rust inside.
There may be some oil residue if the tank was downstream of a crappy
compressor with no separator. *If you want to clean that out, any detergent
that cuts oil will work.

How old is the tank? *Is there an inspection tag on it? *In some states (and
insurance companies) the air tanks have to be inspected every two years to
insure the integrity of the metal. *In MA, where I work, the tanks will also
have a state tag on them. *After the initial state inspection, the insurance
company can inspect them. * In the old days, the inspector used to look
inside and tap around it. *Today, they use an ultrasound device.


There is a plate that says it was inspected in 1996.. The plate is
welded on though so I don't know if it's the original. There is a big
sticker with the dealer's name where it was bought. Maybe I could call
them and see if they know what it was used for?
  #7  
Old September 4th 10, 07:17 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,170
Default How to clean out compressor tank

mshaffer wrote:
On Sep 4, 11:43 am, "Ed Pawlowski" wrote:
"mshaffer" wrote in message

...

Hi, I just bought a large air tank on ebay to use with my air
compressor. The guy said I should wash it out though before I use
it. I'm kinda worried about what kind of chemicals might be in it
since it came from an industrialized area. Is there anything I can
use to totally clean it out? Should I just use normal dish soap or
is there something better?


Here is the tank:


http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...47946127&ssPag...


Thanks,
Michael


There should be NO chemicals in it. Air tanks hold air (and
moisture) and nothing should have ever been in it. There may be rust
inside.
There may be some oil residue if the tank was downstream of a crappy
compressor with no separator. If you want to clean that out, any
detergent that cuts oil will work.

How old is the tank? Is there an inspection tag on it? In some
states (and insurance companies) the air tanks have to be inspected
every two years to insure the integrity of the metal. In MA, where I
work, the tanks will also have a state tag on them. After the
initial state inspection, the insurance company can inspect them. In
the old days, the inspector used to look inside and tap around it.
Today, they use an ultrasound device.


There is a plate that says it was inspected in 1996.. The plate is
welded on though so I don't know if it's the original. There is a big
sticker with the dealer's name where it was bought. Maybe I could call
them and see if they know what it was used for?


At least take a whiff of the air in the tank for odor. That might give you a
clue.

I called the city Boilers and pressure vessels inspector to ask about an air
take I got used. He quickly volunteered to come out and inspect it with an
ultrasonic thickness guage, and told me it was fine. Such a person would
probably be an excellent resource for your question. A commercial compressor
shop could probably help also.



  #8  
Old September 4th 10, 07:30 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,030
Default How to clean out compressor tank


"mshaffer" wrote

There is a plate that says it was inspected in 1996.. The plate is
welded on though so I don't know if it's the original. There is a big
sticker with the dealer's name where it was bought. Maybe I could call
them and see if they know what it was used for?


The 1996 plate is probably the original from the factory if it is welded in
place. There are regulations and standards that pressure vessels must meet.
That nameplate shows the manufacturer, pressure allowed, date made, etc.
At 14 years, it is not very old and if it was not abused, it will last many
more years.

I'd not be overly concerned about chemicals inside. I'd check it for rust
though. If concerned, you may be able to get it inspected at reasonable
cost.

  #9  
Old September 5th 10, 05:38 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 150
Default How to clean out compressor tank

DanG wrote:
I wouldn't worry about it one way or the other. If you are super
worried, remove the automatic bleeder on the bottom of the tank
and install a ball valve or similar. Pressure the tank until the
regulator on the compressor is happy. Close off the compressor.
Open that bottom ball valve and blow down. If you are worried
about mold, mildew, unknown bugs, etc., make up some bleach
water - about 5 water to 1 bleach, empty the tank, pour in a
gallon of the mixture, shake vigorously (yes, I'm kidding), and
pressurize and blow down.

I can't imagine anything in the tank being unsafe. You will be
compressing your own "dirty air", I doubt that the steel tank is
holding much in the way of residual nasties.


I suppose NONE of you guys ever used a device for other than
its intended use.
Just cause it says it's an air tank has no bearing on what
might have been stored in it. And the external environment
matters. Maybe it was used at a nuclear waste recovery facility.
Or an anthrax decontamination project.

I've got milk jugs full of used oil. Would you buy a used
milk carton and put milk in it? What I told you about it
is irrelevant. People LIE!!!

Use your head.
NEVER assume anything...especially if it's on ebay.
  #10  
Old September 5th 10, 06:15 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,491
Default How to clean out compressor tank

mike wrote the following:
DanG wrote:
I wouldn't worry about it one way or the other. If you are super
worried, remove the automatic bleeder on the bottom of the tank and
install a ball valve or similar. Pressure the tank until the
regulator on the compressor is happy. Close off the compressor. Open
that bottom ball valve and blow down. If you are worried about mold,
mildew, unknown bugs, etc., make up some bleach water - about 5 water
to 1 bleach, empty the tank, pour in a gallon of the mixture, shake
vigorously (yes, I'm kidding), and pressurize and blow down.

I can't imagine anything in the tank being unsafe. You will be
compressing your own "dirty air", I doubt that the steel tank is
holding much in the way of residual nasties.


I suppose NONE of you guys ever used a device for other than
its intended use.
Just cause it says it's an air tank has no bearing on what
might have been stored in it. And the external environment
matters. Maybe it was used at a nuclear waste recovery facility.
Or an anthrax decontamination project.

No, they wouldn't do......
cough! cough! yack! yack! ... that.


I've got milk jugs full of used oil. Would you buy a used
milk carton and put milk in it? What I told you about it
is irrelevant. People LIE!!!

Use your head.
NEVER assume anything...especially if it's on ebay.



--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
In the original Orange County. Est. 1683
To email, remove the double zeroes after @
 




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