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Radiant heating (boiler) vs. Forced air



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 23rd 10, 11:40 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 178
Default Radiant heating (boiler) vs. Forced air

I currently have radiant heating in our home and have been quoting prices for a separate AC unit (space pack) installed. At the recent received quotes of $6000 to $8000, it got me thinking about the cost of removing the boiler system and installing a forced air system (furnace). The boiler removal can be done my me as well as the installation of duct work for the forced air. Since the cost of adding an AC unit to a furnace system is roughly $1000, That would leave roughly $5000 to $7000 difference for the installation of the rest of the furnace system and I can't believe it would cost that much....or....am I wrong?

What would the pros and cons be of each?

Thanks
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  #2  
Old August 24th 10, 12:56 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 39
Default Radiant heating (boiler) vs. Forced air

I suspect it costs more than $1000 to add AC. For AC you need a
compressor and a heat exchanger. You also need to run new electrical
circuits to the outside of the house and freon lines to connect the
two. Can your electrical panel handle the additional load (assuming
you are using electrical power for the AC)? I suspect the cost to be
way more than $1000.

As for the pro and cons, I have had both types. I found hot water
baseboard to be quieter, the heat is more even with the floors being
warmer (just my opinion) compare to force hot air if the ducts are in
the ceiling. The baseboards can limit furniture placement. It is
harder to balance if the system is not properly designed. Pumps do
have to be maintained. Force hot air can dry out the air and you with
it. You might need a humidifer. You will probably hear the fans
running. If the ducts are in the ceiling, you don't have to worry
about blocking vents. It is harder to add zones with force hot air. I
would guess that force hot air would warm a room faster.

Ducts can be easy to run but you need to know how to size the ducts
and the returns. If not properly designed, you could end up with hot
and cold rooms.

Do ypu live in an area where a heat pump would make sense? Worth
checking into.

  #3  
Old August 24th 10, 01:15 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Radiant heating (boiler) vs. Forced air

On Aug 23, 5:40*pm, "SBH" wrote:
I currently have radiant heating in our home and have been quoting prices for a separate AC unit (space pack) installed. At the recent received quotes of $6000 to $8000, it got me thinking about the cost of removing the boiler system and installing a forced air system (furnace). The boiler removal can be done my me as well as the installation of duct work for the forced air. Since the cost of adding an AC unit to a furnace system is roughly $1000, That would leave roughly $5000 to $7000 difference for the installation of the rest of the furnace system and I can't believe it would cost that much....or....am I wrong?

What would the pros and cons be of each?

Thanks


Do you mean under floor radiant heat or cast iron upright radiators or
baseboard radiators. My experiance with different types is underfloor
radiant is best by far, then radiators on walls, then forced air. Why
are you condsidering space pack if you can run regular ducts, Spack
pack is something like 1000$ for 100ft of tube. Spacepack costs alot
more to install and as of last year Spacepack was about only 11 seer,
I contacted Spacepack or Unico last fall for info on upgrading our
1996 spacepack air handler. The said this year they would have a seer
13 out, but ducts can use much more efficent equipment, up to near 19
seer.
  #4  
Old August 24th 10, 08:42 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 9,216
Default Radiant heating (boiler) vs. Forced air

On Aug 23, 11:40*pm, "SBH" wrote:
I currently have radiant heating in our home and have been quoting prices for a separate AC unit (space pack) installed. At the recent received quotes of $6000 to $8000, it got me thinking about the cost of removing the boiler system and installing a forced air system (furnace). The boiler removal can be done my me as well as the installation of duct work for the forced air. Since the cost of adding an AC unit to a furnace system is roughly $1000, That would leave roughly $5000 to $7000 difference for the installation of the rest of the furnace system and I can't believe it would cost that much....or....am I wrong?

What would the pros and cons be of each?

Thanks


If going to this extent, buy yourself a reversible heat pump. Heats
and cools.
Ideally a ground source one.
  #5  
Old August 24th 10, 01:03 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 223
Default Radiant heating (boiler) vs. Forced air

The advantages to a forced air system include:
* Air filtration. Helps reduce dust, dirt, and other harmful things in
the air.
* Forced air system can have a humidifier to keep the air comfortable
in the winter.
* Most heat boilers run 70 to 80% fuel efficient. Forced air system,
you can get a furnace with 90% plus efficiency

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


"SBH" wrote in message
...
I currently have radiant heating in our home and have been quoting
prices for a separate AC unit (space pack) installed. At the recent
received quotes of $6000 to $8000, it got me thinking about the cost
of removing the boiler system and installing a forced air system
(furnace). The boiler removal can be done my me as well as the
installation of duct work for the forced air. Since the cost of adding
an AC unit to a furnace system is roughly $1000, That would leave
roughly $5000 to $7000 difference for the installation of the rest of
the furnace system and I can't believe it would cost that
much....or....am I wrong?

What would the pros and cons be of each?

Thanks


  #6  
Old August 24th 10, 03:24 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 4,938
Default Radiant heating (boiler) vs. Forced air

On Aug 24, 7:03*am, "Stormin Mormon"
wrote:
The advantages to a forced air system include:
* Air filtration. Helps reduce dust, dirt, and other harmful things in
the air.
* Forced air system can have a humidifier to keep the air comfortable
in the winter.
* Most heat boilers run 70 to 80% fuel efficient. Forced air system,
you can get a furnace with 90% plus efficiency

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
*www.lds.org
.

"SBH" wrote in message

...
I currently have radiant heating in our home and have been quoting
prices for a separate AC unit (space pack) installed. At the recent
received quotes of $6000 to $8000, it got me thinking about the cost
of removing the boiler system and installing a forced air system
(furnace). The boiler removal can be done my me as well as the
installation of duct work for the forced air. Since the cost of adding
an AC unit to a furnace system is roughly $1000, That would leave
roughly $5000 to $7000 difference for the installation of the rest of
the furnace system and I can't believe it would cost that
much....or....am I wrong?

What would the pros and cons be of each?

Thanks


I dont know of any boiler sold under 83% and they go to 98%, a boiler
needs only a 100-150w pump, a newer high efficency furnace at my small
place uses a 375w blower, Electricity is expensive and a often
overlooked component of heating. But radiant tube underfloor is the
most efficent heat, its under your feet. Common is a 15% reduction in
bills over wall radiators and you can keep the thermostat lower. Also
take into account ductwork air leaks and loss of heat from ducts as
they run, so add another loss compared to underfloor tube. But why
spend thousands if its there and already the best type of heat. Ive
had all types of heat and underfloor radiant was the most comfortable,
warm feet, heat where you are especialy sitting and sleeping. Humidity
control is a benefit to ducts boilers dont do.
  #7  
Old August 24th 10, 10:17 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 266
Default Radiant heating (boiler) vs. Forced air

I've seen those hoses zigzagging under floors in engineering magazines
and I shudder to think about leaks. I had posted a question why they
don't use inert gases like freon instead of water in case of leaks.
(Yes, freon is probably better for cooling than heating, but the type
of gas can be adjusted.)

Further, I'd bet (not sure) the insulation used on any water pipes
will create some sort of dust hazard when it deteriorates.

Now, as I've lived in a forced air house since 1965, I'll tell you the
ducts do collect dust. And I've been in office buildings where cooling
condensate was speculated to collect respiratory microbes. And I have
nosebleeds when we forget to fill the humidifier with water. Futher,
the thermostat measures the temperature at one point, which may be ten
to fifteen degrees different form some other point in the house.

But as I have a lot of books and papers, I would prefer the forced air
because of fear of flooding. In fact, if i were designing a new house
I would firewall the bathrooms and kitchens in one corner to prevent
their flooding the other rooms.

- = -
Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist
http://www.panix.com/~vjp2/vasos.htm http://www.facebook.com/vasjpan2
---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}---
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  #8  
Old August 24th 10, 10:55 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 178
Default Radiant heating (boiler) vs. Forced air


Thank you for the replies.

My radiant heat system is a baseboard system and yes, arranging furniture can be tricky and requires it t be away from the wall a baseboard may be on. I have seen thinner baseboard such as the "Runtal" system. Sharp looking and better with furniture placement. I've also heard about the underfloor system and thought about converting. Anyone care to chime in on the difficulties and/or expense of doing this?

Reading a few replies indicated a heat pump. How does a heat pump work with a boiler system and no AC?

Thanks again.
  #9  
Old August 25th 10, 12:00 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 2,030
Default Radiant heating (boiler) vs. Forced air


wrote in message
...
I've seen those hoses zigzagging under floors in engineering magazines
and I shudder to think about leaks. I had posted a question why they
don't use inert gases like freon instead of water in case of leaks.
(Yes, freon is probably better for cooling than heating, but the type
of gas can be adjusted.)


What inert gas can carry the heat that water can?



Further, I'd bet (not sure) the insulation used on any water pipes
will create some sort of dust hazard when it deteriorates.

Now, as I've lived in a forced air house since 1965, I'll tell you the
ducts do collect dust. And I've been in office buildings where cooling
condensate was speculated to collect respiratory microbes.


Commercial cooling systems with water are rarely used in a residential
setting.


And I have
nosebleeds when we forget to fill the humidifier with water.


You need an automatic fill. Oh, that can cause flooding.


Futher,
the thermostat measures the temperature at one point, which may be ten
to fifteen degrees different form some other point in the house.



Design flaw. The system was not properly balanced.

But as I have a lot of books and papers, I would prefer the forced air
because of fear of flooding. In fact, if i were designing a new house
I would firewall the bathrooms and kitchens in one corner to prevent
their flooding the other rooms.


It can happen, but is rare in a properly maintained house.


  #10  
Old August 25th 10, 04:25 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 68
Default Radiant heating (boiler) vs. Forced air

You don't need to fear flooding. Most new radiant installations are
installed so that each room has it's own thermostat. The piping is
installed in one piece from the basement and back down to the basement
where the valves are. Any leaks would occur in the basement.
 




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