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duct taping exhaust pipes



 
 
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  #11  
Old August 18th 10, 06:07 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 3,491
Default duct taping exhaust pipes

Bob F wrote the following:
wrote:

On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 07:09:52 -0230, "don &/or Lucille"
wrote:


I'd use the real aluminum tape not the mylar type stuff. 3M makes
good one expensive but you get what you pay for in this case, have
used both at work and now wouldn't use anything but the real McCoy

It's not as expensive as replacing his home after the duct tape
ignites and burns his house down.
Duct tape is made for ducts (warm forced air), not HOT exhaust pipes.



In reality, most "duct tape" is not approved for ducts. It just doesn't last.


For general use, I use the clear type (3M and others). I have used some
of it outside and it has been there for years, Summer and Winter,
without deterioration.
Forget the silver grey type. It just delaminates over time and the
remaining glue is almost impossible to remove cleanly.
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  #12  
Old August 18th 10, 07:32 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 165
Default duct taping exhaust pipes

The proper name for Duct Tape is Duct Insulators Tape. It's original
purpose was to hold the canvas in place over the insulation while the
Duct Insulators sewed the canvas up thus making the installation more
durable. That is why it is a cloth tape that is extremely sticky. It
is meant to conform to the canvas used to cover the old style
insulation used on ducts back in the day. It was never intended for
use directly on ducts. It was certainly never meant for use on gas
appliance vent tubing.
--
Tom Horne

On Aug 18, 6:21*am, wrote:
On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 07:09:52 -0230, "don &/or Lucille"

wrote:
I'd use the real aluminum tape not the mylar type stuff. 3M makes good one
expensive but you get what you pay for in this case, have used both at work
and now wouldn't use anything but the real McCoy


It's not as expensive as replacing his home after the duct tape
ignites and burns his house down. *
Duct tape is made for ducts (warm forced air), not HOT exhaust pipes.


  #13  
Old August 18th 10, 11:58 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 11,130
Default duct taping exhaust pipes

On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 01:12:13 -0400, mm
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 19:36:14 -0600, Uno wrote:

I just was cleaning my water heater and see the exhaust pipe on it has
come loose in the middle. Can I just duct tape it for now and not
expect it to melt?


I don't know what you can and can't expect, but I would expect it to
melt.

Use foil tape meant for that purpose.


AKA "Duct tape" - not "duck tape" which is what the cloth stuff is
ACTUALLY - originally made of "cotton duck" - a type of cloth
  #17  
Old August 19th 10, 02:42 AM posted to alt.home.repair
mm
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Posts: 7,843
Default duct taping exhaust pipes

On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 19:50:36 -0500, AZ Nomad
wrote:

On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 19:40:11 -0400, mm wrote:
On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 18:58:37 -0400, wrote:


On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 01:12:13 -0400, mm
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 19:36:14 -0600, Uno wrote:

I just was cleaning my water heater and see the exhaust pipe on it has
come loose in the middle. Can I just duct tape it for now and not
expect it to melt?

I don't know what you can and can't expect, but I would expect it to
melt.

Use foil tape meant for that purpose.

AKA "Duct tape" - not "duck tape" which is what the cloth stuff is
ACTUALLY - originally made of "cotton duck" - a type of cloth


Others said what I just did more strongly, so let me put it another
way.


You're thinking of the difference between duct tape and duct tape, a
worthwhile distinction, but neither of them is the tape for exhaust
pipes. That is metal foil tape.


The foil made for exhaust pipes doesn't work worth a damn. The
flexing caused by the pressure waves of the exhaust quickly cause the
tape to fatigue and rip. I've never heard of such a patch lasting a
whole month.


Well now you have. Mine was put on in November I think and lasted
a whole winter. It weet on an oil furnace just two inches from the
flue collector, the steel part screwed to the furnace immediately past
the heat eachanger, so it gets hot.

Another piece was went about 8 inches up from there and 3 inches over,
out of the hot air flow but I'm sure it got hot. It was wrapped
around the damper (that's hinged and has an adjustable weight) by some
furnace guy and was there for a few years when another furnace guy
took it off.
  #18  
Old August 19th 10, 02:50 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 2,681
Default duct taping exhaust pipes

On 08/18/2010 09:42 PM, mm wrote:
On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 19:50:36 -0500, AZ Nomad
wrote:

On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 19:40:11 -0400, wrote:
On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 18:58:37 -0400, wrote:


On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 01:12:13 -0400,
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 19:36:14 -0600, wrote:

I just was cleaning my water heater and see the exhaust pipe on it has
come loose in the middle. Can I just duct tape it for now and not
expect it to melt?

I don't know what you can and can't expect, but I would expect it to
melt.

Use foil tape meant for that purpose.

AKA "Duct tape" - not "duck tape" which is what the cloth stuff is
ACTUALLY - originally made of "cotton duck" - a type of cloth


Others said what I just did more strongly, so let me put it another
way.


You're thinking of the difference between duct tape and duct tape, a
worthwhile distinction, but neither of them is the tape for exhaust
pipes. That is metal foil tape.


The foil made for exhaust pipes doesn't work worth a damn. The
flexing caused by the pressure waves of the exhaust quickly cause the
tape to fatigue and rip. I've never heard of such a patch lasting a
whole month.


Well now you have. Mine was put on in November I think and lasted
a whole winter. It weet on an oil furnace just two inches from the
flue collector, the steel part screwed to the furnace immediately past
the heat eachanger, so it gets hot.

Another piece was went about 8 inches up from there and 3 inches over,
out of the hot air flow but I'm sure it got hot. It was wrapped
around the damper (that's hinged and has an adjustable weight) by some
furnace guy and was there for a few years when another furnace guy
took it off.


I think he meant on the muffler of a car, which is a much harsher
environment than the flue of a burner due to the cyclic stress imposed
by the pulsing of the exhaust of a piston engine.

nate

--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  #19  
Old August 19th 10, 02:54 AM posted to alt.home.repair
Uno
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Posts: 137
Default duct taping exhaust pipes

On 8/18/2010 10:01 AM, Bob F wrote:
N8N wrote:
On Aug 18, 11:08 am, wrote:
On Aug 17, 8:36 pm, wrote:

I just was cleaning my water heater and see the exhaust pipe on it
has come loose in the middle. Can I just duct tape it for now and
not expect it to melt?
--
Uno

Sounds dangerous to me. Isn't exhaust pipe leaks where carbon
monoxide gets into the house or do water heaters burn so little fuel
that it doesn't give off much exhaust?


no, it's definitely a concern. Most residential water heaters are in
the neighborhood of 30-40K BTU or higher IIRC. I would follow the
advice already given and screw it together. If it was put together
properly in the beginning, the smaller, crimped ends of all the
connections should be pointing in the direction of the exhaust flow to
minimize the possibility of backdraft, even without sealing the
joints. I suppose if you are anal retentive using some muffler cement
might work, covered with metal foil tape (as others have said, NOT any
other kind of "duct" tape - that would be doomed to a presumably
quick, smelly failure.)


My understanding is that the crimped ends should be pointed down to contain
condensation within the pipe instead of letting it drip out at the joints. This
is important for wood stoves.





Thanks all for replies. Once I read them all, I realized that screwing
them together is what I wanted to do. If they are not together in a
convincing way (screws are very convincing), there is definitely a CO
exposure you don't want to have in the place where you hang out to
prepare your meals. (Yes, here in New Mexico, many of us have water
heaters in our kitchens.)

So here's how it went down:

1) Refrain from using hot water for a half hour so that ducts won't be hot.
2) Duct tape up the back of this joint so it stays together for the
next 5 minutes.
3) Use an 1-1/4 screw to make a penetration right on the knuckle. When
you get through the top, stop.
4) Use drill bit to prepare hole for screw.
5) Install screw.
6) Remove duct tape.
7) Thank the nice folks on usenet who helped me out here.

I think I'll foil tape it for good measure. Cheers,
--
Uno
  #20  
Old August 19th 10, 02:56 AM posted to alt.home.repair
Uno
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Posts: 137
Default duct taping exhaust pipes

On 8/18/2010 6:54 PM, Uno wrote:

So here's how it went down:

1) Refrain from using hot water for a half hour so that ducts won't be hot.
2) Duct tape up the back of this joint so it stays together for the next
5 minutes.
3) Use an 1-1/4 screw to make a penetration right on the knuckle. When
you get through the top, stop.
4) Use drill bit to prepare hole for screw.
5) Install screw.
6) Remove duct tape.
7) Thank the nice folks on usenet who helped me out here.

I think I'll foil tape it for good measure. Cheers,


ps I used a different screw for the fastening: a little, metal duct screw.
--
Uno
 




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