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Advice for converting Sears Craftsman 220V compressor plug to washing machine plug



 
 
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  #11  
Old July 25th 10, 02:20 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1,474
Default Advice for converting Sears Craftsman 220V compressor plug to washing machine plug


"Jon Danniken" wrote in message
...
Elmo wrote:
I just want advice for the conversion I just did before I plug it all
in.

Details:
1. I have a two-phase 220V Sears Craftsman compressor which uses a
220 volt plug with one blade sideways (otherwise it looks like a
normal 120V grounded plug).

2. I have no sockets in the house which fit that 220 volt plug.

3. I have a three-pronged dryer socket in the garage with 220 volts
(two hots and a neutral).

4. I just attached a new 3-pronged male dryer cord to a female 220
volt plug with the one blade sideways.

Before I plug in the compressor to the recepticle to the dryer cord
to the recepticle, would you have any concerns about safety or other?


Yes. Find out if your compressor expects the third terminal to be a
ground; the third wire on your dryer is likely a neutral. If such is the
case, you will need to install a properly grounded outlet for your
compressor.


The third terminal on a three wire dryer outlet is a neutral/ground, and by
code must original in the main service panel and not a sub panel




As to sharing the receptacle between a dryer and a compressor, I have done
that with a welder, and to be honest, it gets old really fast.
Eventually, you will want to install a dedicated circuit, and the sooner
the better.

Jon



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  #12  
Old July 25th 10, 02:21 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 175
Default Advice for converting Sears Craftsman 220V compressor plug to washing machine plug

On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 00:36:55 -0700 (PDT), Evan wrote:
On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 00:36:55 -0700 (PDT), Evan wrote:
Why not have a correct 20 amp 240 volt NEMA 6-20 outlet installed in
your home ... which is not capable of supplying more power than your
appliance is rated for


I agree with Evan, the right way to power the compressor with the NEMA
6-20P plug (20amp rating), is to hire an electrician to add a dedicated
220V NEMA 6-20R receptacle with a 30 amp dedicated circuit breaker.

Or to have that electrician swap out the existing NEMA 6-20R with a NEMA
6-20R and to swap out the 30 amp breaker with one with only a 20 amp
rating.

However, the cost of hiring the electrician to change the circuit is more
than that of buying a new compressor with, say, standard 110 volt power.

I use the compressor maybe once every six months. Unknowns in the adapter
setup are what I'm asking about here.

The unknowns to overcome by asking this post a
a) How do I test if the NEMA10-30R is on a sub panel or not?
b) Did I select the right pin ground in the NEMA 6-20R receptacle as the
L-shaped neutral in the NEMA10-30P plug?
  #13  
Old July 25th 10, 02:27 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 175
Default Advice for converting Sears Craftsman 220V compressor plug to washing machine plug

On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 03:51:43 -0400, mm wrote:
Also get a meter that goes up to 250 VAC and measure the voltage at
all three slots of the receptacle, relative to ground.


I did use the Fluke DMM to measure the connections; I was just double
checking which was the ground/neutral because I didn't wire the house in
the first place.

The ground in the two-phase 220v compressor NEMA 6-20P plug should be the
center pin and the ground/neutral in the NEMA10-30R dryer receptacle should
be the L-shaped center prong.

The two questions I would like to ask here a
a) How do I know if the NEMA10-30R is on a sub panel (it's inches from the
main panel on the other side of the wall outside the garage)?
b) Are my tests correct that the ground on the 20-amp NEMA 6-20P plug is
"equivalent" to the ground/neutral on the 30-amp NEMA10-30R receptacle?

  #14  
Old July 25th 10, 02:30 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Advice for converting Sears Craftsman 220V compressor plug towashing machine plug

On 7/25/2010 1:06 AM, Elmo wrote:
I just want advice for the conversion I just did before I plug it all in.

Details:
1. I have a two-phase 220V Sears Craftsman compressor which uses a 220 volt
plug with one blade sideways (otherwise it looks like a normal 120V
grounded plug).

2. I have no sockets in the house which fit that 220 volt plug.

3. I have a three-pronged dryer socket in the garage with 220 volts (two
hots and a neutral).

4. I just attached a new 3-pronged male dryer cord to a female 220 volt
plug with the one blade sideways.

Before I plug in the compressor to the recepticle to the dryer cord to the
recepticle, would you have any concerns about safety or other?

I assumed the neutral in the compressor plug was the center wire (looks
like a ground pin) while I assumed the neutral on the 3-pronged dryer cord
is the L-shaped center pin. Is that the correct assumption for the shared
neutral?


I'm suspecting that out of all these replies, NONE are correct. What i
suspect is that you have a 20a plug on a 120V compressor and you just
don't have any 20a 120v outlets in your house. Better look a little
closer at everything before you feed that unit 240v.

--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  #15  
Old July 25th 10, 02:32 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 175
Default Advice for converting Sears Craftsman 220V compressor plug to washing machine plug

On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 01:04:05 -0700, Smitty Two wrote:
Really? Two phase? How old is this gadget, anyway?


You know, I bought it that damn Sears Craftsman compressor on a whim in a
sale in the 80's. It was (on sale), about 350 or 400 bucks.

Then, when I brought the huge thing home, I realized I didn't have an
outlet for it, so I just let it sit for a year or so. Then I moved, and
didn't have an outlet for it, so I let it sit for a few years. Finally I
moved to a place that had the outlet, and I used it every six months or so
to blow up the kids toys. I moved again, and guess what, no outlet.

Funny thing is that I've seen Sears compressors on sale over and over and
over and over again for, guess what, just about 350 or 400 bucks. They
never changed prices in decades. Amazing.

In hind sight, I never should have bought it as I barely used it due to the
cord and the lack of needs.

However, I still have it. And I actually want to blow up a kids toy and
then figured I'd plug the NEMA 6-20P into an adaptor consisting of a NEMA
6-20R and a NEMA10-30P and then connect to the NEMA10-30R fused by a 30-amp
circuit for my 20-amp compressor.

I was just asking advice, specifically:
a) How do I know that I'm NOT on a sub panel?
b) Did I pick the correct ground/neutral?

Is there anything else I didn't think of (before I plug it in)?
  #16  
Old July 25th 10, 02:35 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1,738
Default Advice for converting Sears Craftsman 220V compressor plug towashing machine plug

On 7/25/2010 1:06 AM, Elmo wrote:
I just want advice for the conversion I just did before I plug it all in.

Details:
1. I have a two-phase 220V Sears Craftsman compressor which uses a 220 volt
plug with one blade sideways (otherwise it looks like a normal 120V
grounded plug).

2. I have no sockets in the house which fit that 220 volt plug.

3. I have a three-pronged dryer socket in the garage with 220 volts (two
hots and a neutral).

4. I just attached a new 3-pronged male dryer cord to a female 220 volt
plug with the one blade sideways.

Before I plug in the compressor to the recepticle to the dryer cord to the
recepticle, would you have any concerns about safety or other?

I assumed the neutral in the compressor plug was the center wire (looks
like a ground pin) while I assumed the neutral on the 3-pronged dryer cord
is the L-shaped center pin. Is that the correct assumption for the shared
neutral?


does it look like this:

http://tinyurl.com/2dd6t2h

--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  #17  
Old July 25th 10, 02:36 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 175
Default Advice for converting Sears Craftsman 220V compressor plug to washing machine plug

On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 05:33:00 -0700, Bill wrote:
Have the proper outlet, wiring, and circuit breaker installed!


Let's look at this from a "safety" standpoint, which is your point.

The "proper" way to do this, all will agree, is to spend more than the
compressor is worth to install a 20-amp dedicated NEMA 6-20R receptacle.

However, from a safety standpoint, if anyone can show me how plugging the
20-amp NEMA 6-20P through an adapter to the 30-amp NEMA10-30P receptacle is
inherently more dangerous, then I'll listen.

Of course, I do realize that the "equipment" won't be protected to 20 amps
(it will be protected to 30 amps); but I'm not at all worried about the
30-year old compressor burning up.

The "house" wiring is still protected to 30 amps, which is what matters.

And "safety" is the same (as far as I can tell) since we're using exactly
the same two hots and the same ground/neutral.

Or did I miss something critical in that analysis?
Advice always welcome.
  #18  
Old July 25th 10, 02:38 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1,738
Default Advice for converting Sears Craftsman 220V compressor plug towashing machine plug

On 7/25/2010 1:06 AM, Elmo wrote:
I just want advice for the conversion I just did before I plug it all in.

Details:
1. I have a two-phase 220V Sears Craftsman compressor which uses a 220 volt
plug with one blade sideways (otherwise it looks like a normal 120V
grounded plug).

2. I have no sockets in the house which fit that 220 volt plug.

3. I have a three-pronged dryer socket in the garage with 220 volts (two
hots and a neutral).

4. I just attached a new 3-pronged male dryer cord to a female 220 volt
plug with the one blade sideways.

Before I plug in the compressor to the recepticle to the dryer cord to the
recepticle, would you have any concerns about safety or other?

I assumed the neutral in the compressor plug was the center wire (looks
like a ground pin) while I assumed the neutral on the 3-pronged dryer cord
is the L-shaped center pin. Is that the correct assumption for the shared
neutral?


Here's a better comparison, scroll down to the 20a section. It seems it
could be a 120v OR a 240v depending on which side the sideways blade is on.

http://www.frentzandsons.com/Hardwar...nfiguratio.htm


--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  #19  
Old July 25th 10, 02:39 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1,474
Default Advice for converting Sears Craftsman 220V compressor plug to washing machine plug


"Steve Barker" wrote in message
...
On 7/25/2010 1:06 AM, Elmo wrote:
I just want advice for the conversion I just did before I plug it all in.

Details:
1. I have a two-phase 220V Sears Craftsman compressor which uses a 220
volt
plug with one blade sideways (otherwise it looks like a normal 120V
grounded plug).

2. I have no sockets in the house which fit that 220 volt plug.

3. I have a three-pronged dryer socket in the garage with 220 volts (two
hots and a neutral).

4. I just attached a new 3-pronged male dryer cord to a female 220 volt
plug with the one blade sideways.

Before I plug in the compressor to the recepticle to the dryer cord to
the
recepticle, would you have any concerns about safety or other?

I assumed the neutral in the compressor plug was the center wire (looks
like a ground pin) while I assumed the neutral on the 3-pronged dryer
cord
is the L-shaped center pin. Is that the correct assumption for the shared
neutral?


I'm suspecting that out of all these replies, NONE are correct. What i
suspect is that you have a 20a plug on a 120V compressor and you just
don't have any 20a 120v outlets in your house. Better look a little
closer at everything before you feed that unit 240v.

--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email


Very good point. Most of these small compressors run 120 or 240 volts, and
do require a 20 amp plug @120 volt. It is entirely probable that the OP is
looking at a 20 amp 120 volt plug and not a 20 amp 240 volt plug, which are
very similar looking


  #20  
Old July 25th 10, 02:44 PM posted to alt.home.repair
dpb
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Posts: 10,403
Default Advice for converting Sears Craftsman 220V compressor plug towashing machine plug

jamesgangnc wrote:
...

Yes, the L shaped prong is the nuetral on a 3 wire dryer. The other
two are the hots. ...


It is ground serving (per applicable Code of the time) as ground/shared
neutral.

Your compressor more likely needs 2 hots and a
ground. While what you are doing is not exactly by the book it will
run your compressor.


It is _exactly_ by current book for 240V service w/ the 240V load there
is no need for the neutral; therefore the ground is no longer serving as
a shared neutral only as ground.

The safety issue is that you will be using your
nuetral line for a ground and using a 30 amp circuit where a 20 amp
one is called for. What you really need to do is install a dedicated
220 outlet in the location of your compressor. Have you looked at the
compressor to see if it can be run on 110? Many motors have alternate
wiring that allows them to run on 220 or 110.


No, NO, _NO_! There is no safety issue; as above the 3rd conductor in a
shared utility (dryer) outlet _IS_ the ground conductor; the NEC
formerly allowed it to be shared function of also serving the neutral.
It is wired to the ground bus, _NOT_ the neutral.

The second misconception here is that there's some proscription against
a higher-rated circuit supply a lesser-rated load--that again is simply
nonsense. The 30A circuit breaker/fuse is there to protect the circuit,
_NOT_ the load; the load will have its own overload protection for that
purpose.

While I'll agree it's certainly a nuisance factor to have a humongous
30A dryer plug on the end of the cord for a small compressor, it is not
an issue whatsoever from a safety (or Code, for that matter) standpoint.

--
 




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