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Washable Electrostatic Furnace Filters - Use While Wet?



 
 
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  #11  
Old February 18th 10, 06:10 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,284
Default Washable Electrostatic Furnace Filters - Use While Wet?

On Feb 17, 9:16*am, wrote:
On Feb 17, 2:56*am, David Nebenzahl wrote:



On 2/16/2010 8:59 PM DerbyDad03 spake thus:


I was looking at one of these "permanent" furnace filters at the Borg
the other day:


http://www.webproducts.com/Detail.bok?no=37


My question:


After you rinse one of these can you put back in while it's still wet
or should you keep a spare "regular" filter on hand while the
electrostatic one dries out?


Dunno, but funny thing: just today I helped a client who had washed out
his electrostatic filter units and couldn't figure out how to get them
back in. But these were the real McCoy, part of a Honeywell
electrostatic unit--you know, like with 20,000 volts and all.


How do these so-called "electrostatic" filters even work? There's no
source of electricity, so they must depend on some kind of static
charge. I can't believe they can be very effective.


That's what I was wondering as well. * Bottom line is whether these
filters really have some benefit or are just using the alleged
electrostatic feature as a marketing hype, hoping people think they
work like the real thing.

In any case, if I were using them, I'd probably let them dry out, at
least most of the way before putting them back in. * Seems that
wouldn't be hard to do if you clean them 2X a year when the ambient
temps are appropriate.



By the way, the real electrostatic units held just an incredible amount
of filth. Really black crap. (They hadn't been cleaned in a while.) So
they really work. And since they weren't quite dry, I advised my client
to dry them out first before putting them back in (we used a hair dryer).


--
You were wrong, and I'm man enough to admit it.


- a Usenet "apology"


"Seems that wouldn't be hard to do if you clean them 2X a year
when the ambient temps are appropriate."

Per the link I posted:

"simply rinse entire filter once a month then reinstall in system."

It doesn't say to dry them (or not) but at 12 times a year, leaving
them out to dry is probably going to mean at least a few furnace
cycles with no filter, especially in the winter.

If I bought one of those, I think I'd I keep a relatively inexpensive
one on hand for temporary use.

Ads
  #12  
Old February 18th 10, 02:04 PM posted to alt.home.repair
N8N
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Posts: 1,195
Default Washable Electrostatic Furnace Filters - Use While Wet?

On Feb 17, 8:08*am, jamesgangnc wrote:
On Feb 17, 6:35*am, Jim Elbrecht wrote:





On Tue, 16 Feb 2010 20:59:43 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03


wrote:
I was looking at one of these "permanent" furnace filters at the Borg
the other day:


http://www.webproducts.com/Detail.bok?no=37


FWIW- my Dr. recommended the Bo-Air 15 [or so] years agohttp://www.riteair.com/
3 times as much as the ones at the Borg- but read on.


I bought one-- then decided it would be nice to be able to dry it
completely or soak it overnight, so I bought a second one at the Borg.
Patted myself on the back for getting it for a third of the cost of
the original. * But I never felt like it was filtering as well. There
was a lot less visible stuff on the surface- so I always assumed it
was probably letting a lot more particles through.


When I replaced my furnace this summer I needed new filters because
the old ones were a different size. * *I couldn't remember the name of
the company that made my original & the sticker had fallen off years
ago.- so I started looking online. * *All the asthma, allergy &
'trouble breathing' groups were *recommending the Bo-Air filters.


When it got here it was exactly the filter that I got way-back-when
that my Dr. had recommended.


My question:


After you rinse one of these can you put back in while it's still wet
or should you keep a spare "regular" filter on hand while the
electrostatic one dries out?


My thoughts were that the fine end of the filter was *so* fine that a
speck of dust would turn to concrete in a damp filter and render the
filter that much less efficient. * * * *Plus, I like to be able to
just grab the filter when my thermostat says it is time-- and do a
good job of cleaning at my leisure. *


Jim


I had a real electrostatic filter on a house I used to own. *It was
hardwired into 115v on the same circuit as the air handler. *It had
plates and they did get pretty dirty. *I would put them in the
dishwasher. *Take them out clean and dry. *I don;t think you can leave
them wet cause it would probably cause arcing. *Once in a great while
you'd hear some big piece of dust get zapped by the thing


yup, I have one of the Honeywell deals in my house. if you turn it on
too soon after cleaning you can hear it arcing.

One of these days I need to have my ductwork cleaned; the PO's had
been running the furnace with no filter at all for some unknown
(presumably long) period of time. The electrostatic helps but the
house is still full of dustbunnies if I don't vacuum every week. At
least I'm not loading up the condenser coils, anyway. (filter was
installed as part of a package with adding A/C to house)

nate
  #13  
Old February 18th 10, 02:22 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,563
Default Washable Electrostatic Furnace Filters - Use While Wet?

I've installed furnaces and AC for a few years.
Can't say as I've ever seen an air filter on a
condensor. How do you keep your condensor filter
dry, when it rains or snows?

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


"N8N"
wrote in message
...

yup, I have one of the Honeywell deals in my
house. if you turn it on
too soon after cleaning you can hear it arcing.

One of these days I need to have my ductwork
cleaned; the PO's had
been running the furnace with no filter at all for
some unknown
(presumably long) period of time. The
electrostatic helps but the
house is still full of dustbunnies if I don't
vacuum every week. At
least I'm not loading up the condenser coils,
anyway. (filter was
installed as part of a package with adding A/C to
house)

nate


  #14  
Old February 18th 10, 02:34 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,505
Default Washable Electrostatic Furnace Filters - Use While Wet?

On Feb 18, 1:10*am, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Feb 17, 9:16*am, wrote:





On Feb 17, 2:56*am, David Nebenzahl wrote:


On 2/16/2010 8:59 PM DerbyDad03 spake thus:


I was looking at one of these "permanent" furnace filters at the Borg
the other day:


http://www.webproducts.com/Detail.bok?no=37


My question:


After you rinse one of these can you put back in while it's still wet
or should you keep a spare "regular" filter on hand while the
electrostatic one dries out?


Dunno, but funny thing: just today I helped a client who had washed out
his electrostatic filter units and couldn't figure out how to get them
back in. But these were the real McCoy, part of a Honeywell
electrostatic unit--you know, like with 20,000 volts and all.


How do these so-called "electrostatic" filters even work? There's no
source of electricity, so they must depend on some kind of static
charge. I can't believe they can be very effective.


That's what I was wondering as well. * Bottom line is whether these
filters really have some benefit or are just using the alleged
electrostatic feature as a marketing hype, hoping people think they
work like the real thing.


In any case, if I were using them, I'd probably let them dry out, at
least most of the way before putting them back in. * Seems that
wouldn't be hard to do if you clean them 2X a year when the ambient
temps are appropriate.


By the way, the real electrostatic units held just an incredible amount
of filth. Really black crap. (They hadn't been cleaned in a while.) So
they really work. And since they weren't quite dry, I advised my client
to dry them out first before putting them back in (we used a hair dryer).


--
You were wrong, and I'm man enough to admit it.


- a Usenet "apology"


"Seems that wouldn't be hard to do if you clean them 2X a year
when the ambient temps are appropriate."

Per the link I posted:

"simply rinse entire filter once a month then reinstall in system."

It doesn't say to dry them (or not) but at 12 times a year, leaving
them out to dry is probably going to mean at least a few furnace
cycles with no filter, especially in the winter.

If I bought one of those, I think I'd I keep a relatively inexpensive
one on hand for temporary use.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -



If the package said to clean them six times a day, would you do that
too? I'm sure there are some extreme conditions where you need to
clean a furnace filter every month. But I've lived in and had
experience with lots of houses and changing filters twice a year
worked just fine. At that point, they were a little dirty, but
easily could have gone even longer. IMO, a lot of telling people to
change filters frequently is to sell more filters. I know the ones
you are considering are washable, but I wouldn't be surprised the same
company sells disposable ones as well and the industry needs a
consistent message. And the more you wash them, the sooner you'll
need a new one of those too.

I have a friend who has a new house and I was showing him how to clean
his electrostatic filters last Fall. Real electrostatic ones, not
the dubious non-electric ones. He has two identical 4 year old
furnaces. Those filters were uncleaned for at least a year, which is
how long he owned the house. We don't know when the previous owner
last cleaned them. There was hardly anything on them at all. He
does have a very clean house, no pets, no kids, etc., which certainly
is a factor.

The best thing to do is see how fast they get dirty in your particular
application and adjust accordingly.
  #15  
Old February 18th 10, 05:16 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,854
Default Washable Electrostatic Furnace Filters - Use While Wet?

Stormin Mormon wrote:
I've installed furnaces and AC for a few years.
Can't say as I've ever seen an air filter on a
condensor. How do you keep your condensor filter
dry, when it rains or snows?


I install filters on condensers for refrigeration units
in restaurants. I explain to the owners that unless they
want to spend another $1,200.00 to replace a compressor,
wash the filter once a week. Why do people always want
to shoot the messenger? *snicker*

TDD
  #16  
Old February 18th 10, 05:48 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,241
Default Washable Electrostatic Furnace Filters - Use While Wet?

On Feb 18, 11:16*am, The Daring Dufas the-daring-
wrote:
Stormin Mormon wrote:
I've installed furnaces and AC for a few years.
Can't say as I've ever seen an air filter on a
condensor. How do you keep your condensor filter
dry, when it rains or snows?


I install filters on condensers for refrigeration units
in restaurants. I explain to the owners that unless they
want to spend another $1,200.00 to replace a compressor,
wash the filter once a week. Why do people always want
to shoot the messenger? **snicker*

TDD


I use medium size/opening filters, not the el-cheapo fibreglass ones
that are almost totally open, but not the real fine particle types
either. I change them once a month if I remember to. They are always
dirty looking if you hold them up to the light. They keep loose dirt
from entering the blower and then maybe clogging the A-frame air-
conditioning condensor coils

I don't understand cleaning ductwork. If the ducts start out clean and
then gradually accumulate dirt, that dirt either stays put, or blows
out into the room. If they start out clean, and you have a filter, how
does the ductwork get dirty? And, if it is dirty, once the loose
dirt blows out, how does more loose dirt occur to get blown out. That
new loose dirt will get blown out whether the duct is clean or has a
build-up of dirt that isn't loose, so cleaning the ductwork is only
needed if it gets so bad that it impedes air-flow. What am I missing
besides enriching all the ductwork cleaning firms?
  #17  
Old February 18th 10, 06:24 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1,854
Default Washable Electrostatic Furnace Filters - Use While Wet?

hr(bob) wrote:
On Feb 18, 11:16 am, The Daring Dufas the-daring-
wrote:
Stormin Mormon wrote:
I've installed furnaces and AC for a few years.
Can't say as I've ever seen an air filter on a
condensor. How do you keep your condensor filter
dry, when it rains or snows?

I install filters on condensers for refrigeration units
in restaurants. I explain to the owners that unless they
want to spend another $1,200.00 to replace a compressor,
wash the filter once a week. Why do people always want
to shoot the messenger? *snicker*

TDD


I use medium size/opening filters, not the el-cheapo fibreglass ones
that are almost totally open, but not the real fine particle types
either. I change them once a month if I remember to. They are always
dirty looking if you hold them up to the light. They keep loose dirt
from entering the blower and then maybe clogging the A-frame air-
conditioning condensor coils

I don't understand cleaning ductwork. If the ducts start out clean and
then gradually accumulate dirt, that dirt either stays put, or blows
out into the room. If they start out clean, and you have a filter, how
does the ductwork get dirty? And, if it is dirty, once the loose
dirt blows out, how does more loose dirt occur to get blown out. That
new loose dirt will get blown out whether the duct is clean or has a
build-up of dirt that isn't loose, so cleaning the ductwork is only
needed if it gets so bad that it impedes air-flow. What am I missing
besides enriching all the ductwork cleaning firms?


I think you may be referring to the "evaporator" which is the cold part
of the AC. The "condenser" is the hot part located outside of the house.
Your refrigerator has a condenser that is either a big wide spaced coil
on the back or a compact coil underneath with a fan.

The evaporator in the form of an "A coil" is what most home central AC
units have on top of a typical upflow furnace. I won't chastise you for
using the wrong terminology because there are many things that I have
little knowledge of myself, like taxidermy, never done any. Remember,
ignorance means you don't know but you can learn, stupid means no way.

TDD
  #20  
Old February 18th 10, 10:41 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,563
Default Washable Electrostatic Furnace Filters - Use While Wet?

I've seen filters on condensors. But, not
residential AC.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


"The Daring Dufas"
wrote in message
...
Stormin Mormon wrote:
I've installed furnaces and AC for a few years.
Can't say as I've ever seen an air filter on a
condensor. How do you keep your condensor filter
dry, when it rains or snows?


I install filters on condensers for refrigeration
units
in restaurants. I explain to the owners that
unless they
want to spend another $1,200.00 to replace a
compressor,
wash the filter once a week. Why do people always
want
to shoot the messenger? *snicker*

TDD


 




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