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Advice on cutting and repairing sheetrock wall



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 7th 10, 12:57 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 106
Default Advice on cutting and repairing sheetrock wall

I have to cut a chunk of sheetrock out of a wall, approx. 2' x 5', to
repair some plastic water pipes (why do people use plastic in places like
this???). I'm going to replace the shower/tub valve, and replace all of the
plastic with copper. This is the final stage of a repair job that I started
a few weeks ago when a plastic (cpvc) pipe broke in the bathroom wall. I'm
basically replacing all of the plastic with copper, and putting in new
valves for the tub/shower, and toilets.

My question has to do with removing and replacing the sheetrock. I'm not
sure I can remove a piece this big intact, since it crosses a stud and is
screwed to the stud in a dozen places. Should I just hack it out of the
wall, or should I take the time to find and remove the screws so that I can
remove it intact?

If I take the time and trouble to remove it intact, I can replace it with
minimal finishing work. If I replace it, I have to redo the texture that is
on it so that it matches the rest of the wall. Any advice from those of you
who have done this before?
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  #2  
Old February 7th 10, 01:16 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 12,885
Default Advice on cutting and repairing sheetrock wall

On Sat, 06 Feb 2010 18:57:50 -0600, Zootal
wrote:

I have to cut a chunk of sheetrock out of a wall, approx. 2' x 5', to
repair some plastic water pipes (why do people use plastic in places like
this???). I'm going to replace the shower/tub valve, and replace all of the
plastic with copper. This is the final stage of a repair job that I started
a few weeks ago when a plastic (cpvc) pipe broke in the bathroom wall. I'm
basically replacing all of the plastic with copper, and putting in new
valves for the tub/shower, and toilets.

My question has to do with removing and replacing the sheetrock. I'm not
sure I can remove a piece this big intact, since it crosses a stud and is
screwed to the stud in a dozen places. Should I just hack it out of the
wall, or should I take the time to find and remove the screws so that I can
remove it intact?

If I take the time and trouble to remove it intact, I can replace it with
minimal finishing work. If I replace it, I have to redo the texture that is
on it so that it matches the rest of the wall. Any advice from those of you
who have done this before?


Either way, you have to texture and finish the repair. That size I
would rip it out and put a new piece in. It seems easier to me.
  #3  
Old February 7th 10, 01:17 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 5,143
Default Advice on cutting and repairing sheetrock wall

Zootal wrote:
I have to cut a chunk of sheetrock out of a wall, approx. 2' x 5', to
repair some plastic water pipes (why do people use plastic in places
like this???). I'm going to replace the shower/tub valve, and replace
all of the plastic with copper. This is the final stage of a repair
job that I started a few weeks ago when a plastic (cpvc) pipe broke
in the bathroom wall. I'm basically replacing all of the plastic with
copper, and putting in new valves for the tub/shower, and toilets.

My question has to do with removing and replacing the sheetrock. I'm
not sure I can remove a piece this big intact, since it crosses a
stud and is screwed to the stud in a dozen places. Should I just hack
it out of the wall, or should I take the time to find and remove the
screws so that I can remove it intact?

If I take the time and trouble to remove it intact, I can replace it
with minimal finishing work. If I replace it, I have to redo the
texture that is on it so that it matches the rest of the wall. Any
advice from those of you who have done this before?\]


If you have extra sheetrock laying around, cutting the outside and then ripping
it out will be fastest. But, if you use a strong magnet to find the screws, you
can just scrape off the putty over them and back them out, and save the piece
without much difficulty. The biggest problem is cutting along the center of the
studs so you can re-screw both side when you are done in either case.

I use a magnet taken from the inside of an old 5 1/4" computer harddrive to find
screws/nails. It'll stick in place over them if you want.


  #4  
Old February 7th 10, 01:50 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 5,158
Default Advice on cutting and repairing sheetrock wall

Bob F wrote:
Zootal wrote:
I have to cut a chunk of sheetrock out of a wall, approx. 2' x 5', to
repair some plastic water pipes (why do people use plastic in places
like this???). I'm going to replace the shower/tub valve, and replace
all of the plastic with copper. This is the final stage of a repair
job that I started a few weeks ago when a plastic (cpvc) pipe broke
in the bathroom wall. I'm basically replacing all of the plastic with
copper, and putting in new valves for the tub/shower, and toilets.

My question has to do with removing and replacing the sheetrock. I'm
not sure I can remove a piece this big intact, since it crosses a
stud and is screwed to the stud in a dozen places. Should I just hack
it out of the wall, or should I take the time to find and remove the
screws so that I can remove it intact?

If I take the time and trouble to remove it intact, I can replace it
with minimal finishing work. If I replace it, I have to redo the
texture that is on it so that it matches the rest of the wall. Any
advice from those of you who have done this before?\]


If you have extra sheetrock laying around, cutting the outside and then ripping
it out will be fastest. But, if you use a strong magnet to find the screws, you
can just scrape off the putty over them and back them out, and save the piece
without much difficulty. The biggest problem is cutting along the center of the
studs so you can re-screw both side when you are done in either case.

I use a magnet taken from the inside of an old 5 1/4" computer harddrive to find
screws/nails. It'll stick in place over them if you want.


I gave up years ago trying to center-cut on a stud- the joint always
ended up looking like crap, from the screws blowing out the cut raw edge
of the drywall. Now, instead, I flush-cut as tight as I can on the side
of the stud where it needs to be opened, and screw (not nail) blocks
against the stud, to catch the edge of the patch when it gets
reinstalled. That allows a proper margin between screw and edge of
drywall, and a nice straight and tight seam to patch.

But then again, nobody will ever pay me for my drywall skills- it takes
me a day to do what a pro can do in an hour. And you can still tell a
pro didn't do it. :^(

--
aem sends...
  #5  
Old February 7th 10, 02:20 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 806
Default Advice on cutting and repairing sheetrock wall

On Sat, 06 Feb 2010 18:57:50 -0600, Zootal
wrote:

I have to cut a chunk of sheetrock out of a wall, approx. 2' x 5', to
repair some plastic water pipes (why do people use plastic in places like
this???). I'm going to replace the shower/tub valve, and replace all of the
plastic with copper. This is the final stage of a repair job that I started
a few weeks ago when a plastic (cpvc) pipe broke in the bathroom wall. I'm
basically replacing all of the plastic with copper, and putting in new
valves for the tub/shower, and toilets.

My question has to do with removing and replacing the sheetrock. I'm not
sure I can remove a piece this big intact, since it crosses a stud and is
screwed to the stud in a dozen places. Should I just hack it out of the
wall, or should I take the time to find and remove the screws so that I can
remove it intact?

If I take the time and trouble to remove it intact, I can replace it with
minimal finishing work. If I replace it, I have to redo the texture that is
on it so that it matches the rest of the wall. Any advice from those of you
who have done this before?


Plan on refinishing the whole wall.

  #6  
Old February 7th 10, 02:44 AM posted to alt.home.repair
Jim
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Posts: 331
Default Advice on cutting and repairing sheetrock wall


"Zootal" wrote in message
. 97.131...
I have to cut a chunk of sheetrock out of a wall, approx. 2' x 5', to
repair some plastic water pipes (why do people use plastic in places like
this???). I'm going to replace the shower/tub valve, and replace all of
the
plastic with copper. This is the final stage of a repair job that I
started
a few weeks ago when a plastic (cpvc) pipe broke in the bathroom wall. I'm
basically replacing all of the plastic with copper, and putting in new
valves for the tub/shower, and toilets.

My question has to do with removing and replacing the sheetrock. I'm not
sure I can remove a piece this big intact, since it crosses a stud and is
screwed to the stud in a dozen places. Should I just hack it out of the
wall, or should I take the time to find and remove the screws so that I
can
remove it intact?

If I take the time and trouble to remove it intact, I can replace it with
minimal finishing work. If I replace it, I have to redo the texture that
is
on it so that it matches the rest of the wall. Any advice from those of
you
who have done this before?


Yes...just rip and tear....use a utility knife and steel square to make your
cuts straight and corners 90 degrees...... I just completed this job ...if
you have a spot where you want to match a piece of drywall to another piece
that does not have a stud backing, just slide a 2X4 on its side through the
hole and screw it to the good drywall leaving half of the 2x4 exposed to
screw the new piece to it on the inside... then you have something to secure
your patch to.... Jim


  #8  
Old February 7th 10, 12:55 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 2,603
Default Advice on cutting and repairing sheetrock wall

aemeijers wrote:

-snip-

I gave up years ago trying to center-cut on a stud- the joint always
ended up looking like crap, from the screws blowing out the cut raw edge
of the drywall. Now, instead, I flush-cut as tight as I can on the side
of the stud where it needs to be opened, and screw (not nail) blocks
against the stud, to catch the edge of the patch when it gets
reinstalled. That allows a proper margin between screw and edge of
drywall, and a nice straight and tight seam to patch.


Second that.


But then again, nobody will ever pay me for my drywall skills- it takes
me a day to do what a pro can do in an hour. And you can still tell a
pro didn't do it. :^(


One day!? You're fast. I futz around with about 10 coats before I'm
happy with it- then I paint it, cry for a minute, and forget it.

Jim
  #10  
Old February 7th 10, 11:18 PM posted to alt.home.repair
Joe
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Posts: 2,842
Default Advice on cutting and repairing sheetrock wall

On Feb 6, 7:50*pm, aemeijers wrote:

snip


I gave up years ago trying to center-cut on a stud- the joint always
ended up looking like crap, from the screws blowing out the cut raw edge
of the drywall. Now, instead, I flush-cut as tight as I can on the side
of the stud where it needs to be opened, and screw (not nail) blocks
against the stud, to catch the edge of the patch when it gets
reinstalled.


All that work can be avoided if you simply use a jig saw with a
shortened blade to just cut the drywall thickness. I have center cut
for drywall patches for years this way. Preparing a new patch first
and using it to mark the opening makes the job a breeze if the cut out
section cannot be reused for some reason. If a stud to stud patch
might be subjected to some stress, then the usual backing means are
advised.

Joe
 




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