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Turn thermostat down or leave steady?



 
 
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  #21  
Old October 29th 09, 11:04 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,563
Default Turn thermostat down or leave steady?

The heat lost is the same as the heat you paid for. Lower
temp loses less heat (or loses more slowly). So turning down
reduces heat used, and fuel bill.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


"RickH" wrote in message
...

No, it takes too long to re-heat the boiler and all the
water in the
pipes, radiators, and floor tubing. It is always best to
set it once
and leave it there all winter. Too much energy is lost when
all that
water is asked to re-heat all the surfaces again. For
example when I
feel the return manifold from the coils under my concrete
slab after
the slab was allowed to cool, the return water is ice cold,
all that
energy to reheat the slab. No, bad asvice, best to keep it
warm and
leave it there, saves tons of energy.



Ads
  #22  
Old October 29th 09, 11:05 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,563
Default Turn thermostat down or leave steady?

I think the lower temp is a savings, however long.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


"hibb" wrote in message
...

I think it would depend on how long you are going to be out
of the
house. I wouldn't turn it down if I am only out for an hour
but if
your are going to be out for 8 hours it might be a good
idea.

David


  #23  
Old October 29th 09, 11:05 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,563
Default Turn thermostat down or leave steady?

I think the lower temp is a savings, however long.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


"hibb" wrote in message
...

I think it would depend on how long you are going to be out
of the
house. I wouldn't turn it down if I am only out for an hour
but if
your are going to be out for 8 hours it might be a good
idea.

David


  #24  
Old October 29th 09, 11:06 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,563
Default Turn thermostat down or leave steady?

Either one. My answer is the same. Lower temp means less
heat used.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


"RickH" wrote in message
news:2e779c01-e006-478d-8376-

Is this for forced air furnace or boiler?



  #25  
Old October 29th 09, 11:06 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,563
Default Turn thermostat down or leave steady?

Either one. My answer is the same. Lower temp means less
heat used.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


"RickH" wrote in message
news:2e779c01-e006-478d-8376-

Is this for forced air furnace or boiler?



  #26  
Old October 29th 09, 11:54 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1,334
Default Turn thermostat down or leave steady?

Stormin Mormon wrote:
Please forgive me while I troll for a moment.....

Is it energy saving to turn the thermostat down, when
leaving the house? I mean, the furnace has to run to catch
up when I get home. I have a way of looking at the matter.
I'll explain my point of view after the argument is
underway.


In most applications it saves energy to turn it down. However if you
have a heat pump, and to get the house warmed up again it goes to
emergency heat, then it can cost more. If you can turn off the
emergency heat and wait a long time for the heat pump to catch up, then
you will save energy. The worst case is electric emergency heat, gas
emergency heat may or may not save money depending on the price and
efficiency of the furnace. Although it just occurred to me that you
asked about conserving *energy* and not *money* so that may mean that no
mater what your heating system is, turning it down then up again will
always save *energy*... I think?
  #27  
Old October 29th 09, 11:54 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,334
Default Turn thermostat down or leave steady?

Stormin Mormon wrote:
Please forgive me while I troll for a moment.....

Is it energy saving to turn the thermostat down, when
leaving the house? I mean, the furnace has to run to catch
up when I get home. I have a way of looking at the matter.
I'll explain my point of view after the argument is
underway.


In most applications it saves energy to turn it down. However if you
have a heat pump, and to get the house warmed up again it goes to
emergency heat, then it can cost more. If you can turn off the
emergency heat and wait a long time for the heat pump to catch up, then
you will save energy. The worst case is electric emergency heat, gas
emergency heat may or may not save money depending on the price and
efficiency of the furnace. Although it just occurred to me that you
asked about conserving *energy* and not *money* so that may mean that no
mater what your heating system is, turning it down then up again will
always save *energy*... I think?
  #28  
Old October 30th 09, 12:06 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,334
Default Turn thermostat down or leave steady?

RickH wrote:
On Oct 29, 11:20 am, IGot2P wrote:
RickH wrote:
On Oct 29, 7:29 am, Frank wrote:
On Oct 29, 8:22 am, "Stormin Mormon"
wrote:
Please forgive me while I troll for a moment.....
Is it energy saving to turn the thermostat down, when
leaving the house? I mean, the furnace has to run to catch
up when I get home. I have a way of looking at the matter.
I'll explain my point of view after the argument is
underway.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
Yes, you save energy turning it down. In balance less heat is lost.
No, it takes too long to re-heat the boiler and all the water in the
pipes, radiators, and floor tubing. It is always best to set it once
and leave it there all winter. Too much energy is lost when all that
water is asked to re-heat all the surfaces again. For example when I
feel the return manifold from the coils under my concrete slab after
the slab was allowed to cool, the return water is ice cold, all that
energy to reheat the slab. No, bad asvice, best to keep it warm and
leave it there, saves tons of energy.

I hope that you were just kidding because obviously you are wrong! Just
think for a minute.....if you were going to be gone for three months
don't you think you would save energy if you turned your thermostat
down? Well, the same would be true for a few hours, just not to the same
extent.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Yes, if I turned it down and left it there for a week or longer maybe.

But downturning for any period under a couple days and all the mass
you've spent heating once, now you have to re-heat over again. (my
system has several thousand feet of water tubing under both house
floor and garage slab zoned).

It might be different if you have forced air heat, but for water heat
(via radiators or radiant tube) every installer tells you "set it once
and forget it, the idea is to store heat".


I believe in your situation it will still save energy. The reason they
tell you to "set it and forget it" is for comfort. Due to the large
mass of your system it will have a much slower recovery time, but that
does not mean it will take more energy, it's just slower. Or you could
turn it down hours before leaving and have it turn on hours before
arriving home again. That should help with the comfort.
  #29  
Old October 30th 09, 12:06 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,334
Default Turn thermostat down or leave steady?

RickH wrote:
On Oct 29, 11:20 am, IGot2P wrote:
RickH wrote:
On Oct 29, 7:29 am, Frank wrote:
On Oct 29, 8:22 am, "Stormin Mormon"
wrote:
Please forgive me while I troll for a moment.....
Is it energy saving to turn the thermostat down, when
leaving the house? I mean, the furnace has to run to catch
up when I get home. I have a way of looking at the matter.
I'll explain my point of view after the argument is
underway.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
Yes, you save energy turning it down. In balance less heat is lost.
No, it takes too long to re-heat the boiler and all the water in the
pipes, radiators, and floor tubing. It is always best to set it once
and leave it there all winter. Too much energy is lost when all that
water is asked to re-heat all the surfaces again. For example when I
feel the return manifold from the coils under my concrete slab after
the slab was allowed to cool, the return water is ice cold, all that
energy to reheat the slab. No, bad asvice, best to keep it warm and
leave it there, saves tons of energy.

I hope that you were just kidding because obviously you are wrong! Just
think for a minute.....if you were going to be gone for three months
don't you think you would save energy if you turned your thermostat
down? Well, the same would be true for a few hours, just not to the same
extent.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Yes, if I turned it down and left it there for a week or longer maybe.

But downturning for any period under a couple days and all the mass
you've spent heating once, now you have to re-heat over again. (my
system has several thousand feet of water tubing under both house
floor and garage slab zoned).

It might be different if you have forced air heat, but for water heat
(via radiators or radiant tube) every installer tells you "set it once
and forget it, the idea is to store heat".


I believe in your situation it will still save energy. The reason they
tell you to "set it and forget it" is for comfort. Due to the large
mass of your system it will have a much slower recovery time, but that
does not mean it will take more energy, it's just slower. Or you could
turn it down hours before leaving and have it turn on hours before
arriving home again. That should help with the comfort.
  #30  
Old October 30th 09, 12:29 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 71
Default Turn thermostat down or leave steady?

No surveys or studies needed to address this question. The Second Law of
Thermodynamics decrees that the speed and extent of all heat transfers in
the universe depends solely on the temperature differential between two
objects. The moment you turn down the thermostat you start saving money. The
longer you keep it down, the more money you save.

For further musings: http://www.rationality.net/entropy.htm

--
Walter
www.rationality.net
-
"Frank" wrote in message
...
On Oct 29, 8:22 am, "Stormin Mormon"
wrote:
Please forgive me while I troll for a moment.....

Is it energy saving to turn the thermostat down, when
leaving the house? I mean, the furnace has to run to catch
up when I get home. I have a way of looking at the matter.
I'll explain my point of view after the argument is
underway.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


Yes, you save energy turning it down. In balance less heat is lost.


 




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