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Thermostat placement



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 16th 09, 02:37 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 267
Default Thermostat placement

I have a Tri-level home with two separate furnaces and air conditioning
units. One unit controls the lower two levels and another the upstairs
level. The lower unit has a thermostat located at the bottom of the
stairway leading to the upstairs, and the upstairs had a thermostat at
the TOP of those stairs.

Ever since I moved into this home (30+ years ago), I have had uneven
heat/cooling of the upstairs rooms. When the heat or cooling would go
on, the room temperature would be some 8-10 degrees different from what
the thermostat was reading. Eventually the thermostat would be effected
by the temperature change and would turn off the heat or AC. The only
problem was it ran much longer when it would come on, and the uneven
room temperatures.

Recently I read that a thermostat should NOT be installed at the top of
a stairs. Obviously heat from the downstairs would tend to rise and
impact on the upstairs thermostat when cooling was taking place. The
question I have is why the uneven control while heating is taking place?
One would think that when the upstairs furnace was on, the stairs
would have little or no impact due to the heat rising up?

Finally I decided to do something about this uneven temperature
problem. I took a digital thermometer and looked for a location in the
same hallway upstairs that was more representative of the true
temperature. That is, much warmer than being sensed by the thermostat.
After relocating the thermostat some 10 feet away from the stairs the
temperature is much more even. I am very happy with the result.

My question is this: I can understand the impact of the stairway on
cooling the upstairs, but why did the heating of the upstairs respond
poorly as well? I feel I am overlooking something simple, since I know
it DOES impact it by the results I achieved.
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  #2  
Old January 16th 09, 03:36 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 5,964
Default Thermostat placement


"Ken" wrote in message
My question is this: I can understand the impact of the stairway on
cooling the upstairs, but why did the heating of the upstairs respond
poorly as well? I feel I am overlooking something simple, since I know it
DOES impact it by the results I achieved.


A lot depends on the air currents too. If you have heat pouring into the
rooms and nothing hitting the thermostat, it will be very slow to respond.
You can also get cold air currents going by the thermostat and down the
stairs too.

Light a candle and stand in the stair well. Move the candle from floor to
ceiling and watch the flame. You'll suddenly understand a lot.

Ed



  #3  
Old January 16th 09, 03:41 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 267
Default Thermostat placement

Bubba wrote:
On Fri, 16 Jan 2009 07:37:13 -0600, Ken wrote:

I have a Tri-level home with two separate furnaces and air conditioning
units. One unit controls the lower two levels and another the upstairs
level. The lower unit has a thermostat located at the bottom of the
stairway leading to the upstairs, and the upstairs had a thermostat at
the TOP of those stairs.

Ever since I moved into this home (30+ years ago), I have had uneven
heat/cooling of the upstairs rooms. When the heat or cooling would go
on, the room temperature would be some 8-10 degrees different from what
the thermostat was reading. Eventually the thermostat would be effected
by the temperature change and would turn off the heat or AC. The only
problem was it ran much longer when it would come on, and the uneven
room temperatures.

Recently I read that a thermostat should NOT be installed at the top of
a stairs. Obviously heat from the downstairs would tend to rise and
impact on the upstairs thermostat when cooling was taking place. The
question I have is why the uneven control while heating is taking place?
One would think that when the upstairs furnace was on, the stairs
would have little or no impact due to the heat rising up?

Finally I decided to do something about this uneven temperature
problem. I took a digital thermometer and looked for a location in the
same hallway upstairs that was more representative of the true
temperature. That is, much warmer than being sensed by the thermostat.
After relocating the thermostat some 10 feet away from the stairs the
temperature is much more even. I am very happy with the result.

My question is this: I can understand the impact of the stairway on
cooling the upstairs, but why did the heating of the upstairs respond
poorly as well? I feel I am overlooking something simple, since I know
it DOES impact it by the results I achieved.


You have poor molecular acceleration of the electrons in the air due
to improper placement of the two heating/cooling systems. Both systems
need to be removed from the home and reinstalled so they both have a
center point of balance in the home.
Next you need to clean and sanitize the ductwork in both systems.
Next have an airflow company come in and balance both systems.
Next have the thermostat wiring replaced with new wiring.
While doing the wiring, replace the thermostats so the electron
particles of the 24 volt system mimic the particles of the new stats.
All of this should give you a well operating system.
Bubba


Dear Bubba,

I appreciate your in depth analysis of my question, and I feel
obligated to repay you with my diagnosis of YOU. You should immediately
gather up ALL the laxatives available to you, and take them. It is
obvious that you do not have a job, and perhaps the reason is that your
**** level has reached your brain. Taking those laxatives will
certainly add a lot to your posts, and who knows, it might allow you to
find the unemployment office or a place of employment?? I sure hope
Obama has a program that can help people like you.

  #4  
Old January 16th 09, 05:22 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,601
Default Thermostat placement

On Fri, 16 Jan 2009 07:37:13 -0600, Ken wrote:

I have a Tri-level home with two separate furnaces and air conditioning
units. One unit controls the lower two levels and another the upstairs
level. The lower unit has a thermostat located at the bottom of the
stairway leading to the upstairs, and the upstairs had a thermostat at
the TOP of those stairs.

Ever since I moved into this home (30+ years ago), I have had uneven
heat/cooling of the upstairs rooms. When the heat or cooling would go
on, the room temperature would be some 8-10 degrees different from what
the thermostat was reading. Eventually the thermostat would be effected
by the temperature change and would turn off the heat or AC. The only
problem was it ran much longer when it would come on, and the uneven
room temperatures.

Recently I read that a thermostat should NOT be installed at the top of
a stairs. Obviously heat from the downstairs would tend to rise and
impact on the upstairs thermostat when cooling was taking place. The
question I have is why the uneven control while heating is taking place?
One would think that when the upstairs furnace was on, the stairs
would have little or no impact due to the heat rising up?

Finally I decided to do something about this uneven temperature
problem. I took a digital thermometer and looked for a location in the
same hallway upstairs that was more representative of the true
temperature. That is, much warmer than being sensed by the thermostat.
After relocating the thermostat some 10 feet away from the stairs the
temperature is much more even. I am very happy with the result.

My question is this: I can understand the impact of the stairway on
cooling the upstairs, but why did the heating of the upstairs respond
poorly as well? I feel I am overlooking something simple, since I know
it DOES impact it by the results I achieved.



I have a large central open staircase. At the top of the stairs is a
cold air return and 4 feet about it is a thermostat for the upper
floors. The first floor thermostat is about 4' above the bottom cold
air return. The two systems work independently, but both themostats
are on inside walls. I grew up in a house where the thermostat would
kick on when the front door was opened during the winter. You may
want to have the blower on all the time, or ceiling fans, or an extra
fan to circulate the air. All homes have hot-cold pockets, but you
can minimize that with fans, draperies, furniture, etc.
  #5  
Old January 16th 09, 06:26 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 267
Default Thermostat placement

Phisherman wrote:
On Fri, 16 Jan 2009 07:37:13 -0600, Ken wrote:

I have a Tri-level home with two separate furnaces and air conditioning
units. One unit controls the lower two levels and another the upstairs
level. The lower unit has a thermostat located at the bottom of the
stairway leading to the upstairs, and the upstairs had a thermostat at
the TOP of those stairs.

Ever since I moved into this home (30+ years ago), I have had uneven
heat/cooling of the upstairs rooms. When the heat or cooling would go
on, the room temperature would be some 8-10 degrees different from what
the thermostat was reading. Eventually the thermostat would be effected
by the temperature change and would turn off the heat or AC. The only
problem was it ran much longer when it would come on, and the uneven
room temperatures.

Recently I read that a thermostat should NOT be installed at the top of
a stairs. Obviously heat from the downstairs would tend to rise and
impact on the upstairs thermostat when cooling was taking place. The
question I have is why the uneven control while heating is taking place?
One would think that when the upstairs furnace was on, the stairs
would have little or no impact due to the heat rising up?

Finally I decided to do something about this uneven temperature
problem. I took a digital thermometer and looked for a location in the
same hallway upstairs that was more representative of the true
temperature. That is, much warmer than being sensed by the thermostat.
After relocating the thermostat some 10 feet away from the stairs the
temperature is much more even. I am very happy with the result.

My question is this: I can understand the impact of the stairway on
cooling the upstairs, but why did the heating of the upstairs respond
poorly as well? I feel I am overlooking something simple, since I know
it DOES impact it by the results I achieved.



I have a large central open staircase. At the top of the stairs is a
cold air return and 4 feet about it is a thermostat for the upper
floors. The first floor thermostat is about 4' above the bottom cold
air return. The two systems work independently, but both themostats
are on inside walls. I grew up in a house where the thermostat would
kick on when the front door was opened during the winter. You may
want to have the blower on all the time, or ceiling fans, or an extra
fan to circulate the air. All homes have hot-cold pockets, but you
can minimize that with fans, draperies, furniture, etc.


First I would like to thank you and others who replied with helpful
comments. As I wrote in my original message, moving the thermostat
improved the situation dramatically. I am sure the fact the old
location was directly above the stairs was largely responsible for its
poor performance. It is easy to visualize how the warm air of the lower
floor would travel up the stairs and impact that thermostat when cooling
was taking place. What puzzled me is why there was still a problem when
furnaces were being used. One would think that the heat rising from the
lower floor would turn off the upstairs thermostat earlier, rather than
later.

As Ed suggested, there has to be air currents effecting the old
location because moving the thermostat's location solved the problem. I
guess I should just be happy the problem was solved, but I like to
understand WHY something happened. Thanks.
  #6  
Old January 16th 09, 06:35 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 288
Default Thermostat placement

As an inspector, I recall a guy that was dealing with such issues.
He put a bathroom vent fan at the second floor ceiling, blowing into
the open wall cavity. He had also cut an opening at floor level in
the
wall. So there was an uninterrupted path to the wall cavity on which
the thermostat was mounted.
The thermostat was a temperature setback unit, with its sensing
thermistor at the lower rear portion.
He had a small hole behind the temperature sensor, and all it really
sensed was the temperature of the air from the second floor.
Yeah, this guy acknowledged being on medication for his OCD.

On Jan 16, 8:37*am, Ken wrote:
* * * * I have a Tri-level home with two separate furnaces and air conditioning
units. *One unit controls the lower two levels and another the upstairs
level. *The lower unit has a thermostat located at the bottom of the
stairway leading to the upstairs, and the upstairs had a thermostat at
the TOP of those stairs.

* * * * Ever since I moved into this home (30+ years ago), I have had uneven
heat/cooling of the upstairs rooms. *When the heat or cooling would go
on, the room temperature would be some 8-10 degrees different from what
the thermostat was reading. *Eventually the thermostat would be effected
by the temperature change and would turn off the heat or AC. *The only
problem was it ran much longer when it would come on, and the uneven
room temperatures.

* * * * Recently I read that a thermostat should NOT be installed at the top of
a stairs. *Obviously heat from the downstairs would tend to rise and
impact on the upstairs thermostat when cooling was taking place. *The
question I have is why the uneven control while heating is taking place?
* One would think that when the upstairs furnace was on, the stairs
would have little or no impact due to the heat rising up?

* * * * Finally I decided to do something about this uneven temperature
problem. *I took a digital thermometer and looked for a location in the
same hallway upstairs that was more representative of the true
temperature. *That is, much warmer than being sensed by the thermostat.
* After relocating the thermostat some 10 feet away from the stairs the
temperature is much more even. *I am very happy with the result.

* * * * My question is this: *I can understand the impact of the stairway on
cooling the upstairs, but why did the heating of the upstairs respond
poorly as well? *I feel I am overlooking something simple, since I know
it DOES impact it by the results I achieved.


  #7  
Old January 16th 09, 06:59 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,284
Default Thermostat placement

On Jan 16, 12:26*pm, Ken wrote:
Phisherman wrote:
On Fri, 16 Jan 2009 07:37:13 -0600, Ken wrote:


* * * *I have a Tri-level home with two separate furnaces and air conditioning
units. *One unit controls the lower two levels and another the upstairs
level. *The lower unit has a thermostat located at the bottom of the
stairway leading to the upstairs, and the upstairs had a thermostat at
the TOP of those stairs.


* * * *Ever since I moved into this home (30+ years ago), I have had uneven
heat/cooling of the upstairs rooms. *When the heat or cooling would go
on, the room temperature would be some 8-10 degrees different from what
the thermostat was reading. *Eventually the thermostat would be effected
by the temperature change and would turn off the heat or AC. *The only
problem was it ran much longer when it would come on, and the uneven
room temperatures.


* * * *Recently I read that a thermostat should NOT be installed at the top of
a stairs. *Obviously heat from the downstairs would tend to rise and
impact on the upstairs thermostat when cooling was taking place. *The
question I have is why the uneven control while heating is taking place?
*One would think that when the upstairs furnace was on, the stairs
would have little or no impact due to the heat rising up?


* * * *Finally I decided to do something about this uneven temperature
problem. *I took a digital thermometer and looked for a location in the
same hallway upstairs that was more representative of the true
temperature. *That is, much warmer than being sensed by the thermostat.
*After relocating the thermostat some 10 feet away from the stairs the
temperature is much more even. *I am very happy with the result.


* * * *My question is this: *I can understand the impact of the stairway on
cooling the upstairs, but why did the heating of the upstairs respond
poorly as well? *I feel I am overlooking something simple, since I know
it DOES impact it by the results I achieved.


I have a large central open staircase. *At the top of the stairs is a
cold air return and 4 feet about it is a thermostat for the upper
floors. * The first floor thermostat is about 4' above the bottom cold
air return. *The two systems work independently, but both themostats
are on inside walls. *I grew up in a house where the thermostat would
kick on when the front door was opened during the winter. * You may
want to have the blower on all the time, or ceiling fans, or an extra
fan to circulate the air. * * All homes have hot-cold pockets, but you
can minimize that with fans, draperies, furniture, etc.


* * * * First I would like to thank you and others who replied with helpful
comments. *As I wrote in my original message, moving the thermostat
improved the situation dramatically. *I am sure the fact the old
location was directly above the stairs was largely responsible for its
poor performance. *It is easy to visualize how the warm air of the lower
floor would travel up the stairs and impact that thermostat when cooling
was taking place. *What puzzled me is why there was still a problem when
furnaces were being used. *One would think that the heat rising from the
lower floor would turn off the upstairs thermostat earlier, rather than
later.

* * * * As Ed suggested, there has to be air currents effecting the old
location because moving the thermostat's location solved the problem. *I
guess I should just be happy the problem was solved, but I like to
understand WHY something happened. *Thanks.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Do you know what is behind the wall where the upstairs stat was
mounted?

They say you shouldn't mount a stat on an outside wall since they are
typically colder than the air in the room. Is it possible that the
wall itself could be affecting the stat?

At the top of my stairs I have an access panel for the tub. This
cavity is open from the basement to the attic and typically colder
than the surrounding air.
  #8  
Old January 16th 09, 08:01 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,938
Default Thermostat placement

On Jan 16, 7:37*am, Ken wrote:
* * * * I have a Tri-level home with two separate furnaces and air conditioning
units. *One unit controls the lower two levels and another the upstairs
level. *The lower unit has a thermostat located at the bottom of the
stairway leading to the upstairs, and the upstairs had a thermostat at
the TOP of those stairs.

* * * * Ever since I moved into this home (30+ years ago), I have had uneven
heat/cooling of the upstairs rooms. *When the heat or cooling would go
on, the room temperature would be some 8-10 degrees different from what
the thermostat was reading. *Eventually the thermostat would be effected
by the temperature change and would turn off the heat or AC. *The only
problem was it ran much longer when it would come on, and the uneven
room temperatures.

* * * * Recently I read that a thermostat should NOT be installed at the top of
a stairs. *Obviously heat from the downstairs would tend to rise and
impact on the upstairs thermostat when cooling was taking place. *The
question I have is why the uneven control while heating is taking place?
* One would think that when the upstairs furnace was on, the stairs
would have little or no impact due to the heat rising up?

* * * * Finally I decided to do something about this uneven temperature
problem. *I took a digital thermometer and looked for a location in the
same hallway upstairs that was more representative of the true
temperature. *That is, much warmer than being sensed by the thermostat.
* After relocating the thermostat some 10 feet away from the stairs the
temperature is much more even. *I am very happy with the result.

* * * * My question is this: *I can understand the impact of the stairway on
cooling the upstairs, but why did the heating of the upstairs respond
poorly as well? *I feel I am overlooking something simple, since I know
it DOES impact it by the results I achieved.


I am only guessing, put the thermostat in a room like the bedroom,
halls are drafty. Heat rises, cool AC air falls so summer will be
different by alot. The thermostat can be calibrated for temp reading
if it is wrong and an anticipator setting on many or swing temp
setting can make heat more even. Factory settings are a start point to
your comfort. Wasnt Bubba the Hvac pro helpfull.
  #9  
Old January 16th 09, 09:07 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 267
Default Thermostat placement

DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Jan 16, 12:26 pm, Ken wrote:
Phisherman wrote:
On Fri, 16 Jan 2009 07:37:13 -0600, Ken wrote:
I have a Tri-level home with two separate furnaces and air conditioning
units. One unit controls the lower two levels and another the upstairs
level. The lower unit has a thermostat located at the bottom of the
stairway leading to the upstairs, and the upstairs had a thermostat at
the TOP of those stairs.
Ever since I moved into this home (30+ years ago), I have had uneven
heat/cooling of the upstairs rooms. When the heat or cooling would go
on, the room temperature would be some 8-10 degrees different from what
the thermostat was reading. Eventually the thermostat would be effected
by the temperature change and would turn off the heat or AC. The only
problem was it ran much longer when it would come on, and the uneven
room temperatures.
Recently I read that a thermostat should NOT be installed at the top of
a stairs. Obviously heat from the downstairs would tend to rise and
impact on the upstairs thermostat when cooling was taking place. The
question I have is why the uneven control while heating is taking place?
One would think that when the upstairs furnace was on, the stairs
would have little or no impact due to the heat rising up?
Finally I decided to do something about this uneven temperature
problem. I took a digital thermometer and looked for a location in the
same hallway upstairs that was more representative of the true
temperature. That is, much warmer than being sensed by the thermostat.
After relocating the thermostat some 10 feet away from the stairs the
temperature is much more even. I am very happy with the result.
My question is this: I can understand the impact of the stairway on
cooling the upstairs, but why did the heating of the upstairs respond
poorly as well? I feel I am overlooking something simple, since I know
it DOES impact it by the results I achieved.
I have a large central open staircase. At the top of the stairs is a
cold air return and 4 feet about it is a thermostat for the upper
floors. The first floor thermostat is about 4' above the bottom cold
air return. The two systems work independently, but both themostats
are on inside walls. I grew up in a house where the thermostat would
kick on when the front door was opened during the winter. You may
want to have the blower on all the time, or ceiling fans, or an extra
fan to circulate the air. All homes have hot-cold pockets, but you
can minimize that with fans, draperies, furniture, etc.

First I would like to thank you and others who replied with helpful
comments. As I wrote in my original message, moving the thermostat
improved the situation dramatically. I am sure the fact the old
location was directly above the stairs was largely responsible for its
poor performance. It is easy to visualize how the warm air of the lower
floor would travel up the stairs and impact that thermostat when cooling
was taking place. What puzzled me is why there was still a problem when
furnaces were being used. One would think that the heat rising from the
lower floor would turn off the upstairs thermostat earlier, rather than
later.

As Ed suggested, there has to be air currents effecting the old
location because moving the thermostat's location solved the problem. I
guess I should just be happy the problem was solved, but I like to
understand WHY something happened. Thanks.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Do you know what is behind the wall where the upstairs stat was
mounted?


Just a bedroom. There is no unusual temperature factor behind either
location to effect what the thermostat would read.


They say you shouldn't mount a stat on an outside wall since they are
typically colder than the air in the room. Is it possible that the
wall itself could be affecting the stat?


A good point, but that is not the case here. It really seems to be the
fact that it was at the top of the stairs, for if I took a thermometer
elsewhere in the hall the temperature would be more nearly that of the
rooms being heated. Again, there could be some unusual air currents in
that area that are unrelated to being at the top of the stairs, but it
definitely worked better when moved.


At the top of my stairs I have an access panel for the tub. This
cavity is open from the basement to the attic and typically colder
than the surrounding air.



  #10  
Old January 16th 09, 09:12 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 267
Default Thermostat placement

Michael B wrote:
As an inspector, I recall a guy that was dealing with such issues.
He put a bathroom vent fan at the second floor ceiling, blowing into
the open wall cavity. He had also cut an opening at floor level in
the
wall. So there was an uninterrupted path to the wall cavity on which
the thermostat was mounted.
The thermostat was a temperature setback unit, with its sensing
thermistor at the lower rear portion.
He had a small hole behind the temperature sensor, and all it really
sensed was the temperature of the air from the second floor.


Another good point. I even went so far as to plug up the hole that the
thermostat wires were coming through, thinking much like the example you
gave. I thought a draft of sort might be coming from the attic
effecting the thermistor like you cited.

Yeah, this guy acknowledged being on medication for his OCD.

On Jan 16, 8:37 am, Ken wrote:
I have a Tri-level home with two separate furnaces and air conditioning
units. One unit controls the lower two levels and another the upstairs
level. The lower unit has a thermostat located at the bottom of the
stairway leading to the upstairs, and the upstairs had a thermostat at
the TOP of those stairs.

Ever since I moved into this home (30+ years ago), I have had uneven
heat/cooling of the upstairs rooms. When the heat or cooling would go
on, the room temperature would be some 8-10 degrees different from what
the thermostat was reading. Eventually the thermostat would be effected
by the temperature change and would turn off the heat or AC. The only
problem was it ran much longer when it would come on, and the uneven
room temperatures.

Recently I read that a thermostat should NOT be installed at the top of
a stairs. Obviously heat from the downstairs would tend to rise and
impact on the upstairs thermostat when cooling was taking place. The
question I have is why the uneven control while heating is taking place?
One would think that when the upstairs furnace was on, the stairs
would have little or no impact due to the heat rising up?

Finally I decided to do something about this uneven temperature
problem. I took a digital thermometer and looked for a location in the
same hallway upstairs that was more representative of the true
temperature. That is, much warmer than being sensed by the thermostat.
After relocating the thermostat some 10 feet away from the stairs the
temperature is much more even. I am very happy with the result.

My question is this: I can understand the impact of the stairway on
cooling the upstairs, but why did the heating of the upstairs respond
poorly as well? I feel I am overlooking something simple, since I know
it DOES impact it by the results I achieved.


 




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