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Painting exterior stucco spray or roll?



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 31st 08, 03:15 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair
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Posts: 29
Default Painting exterior stucco spray or roll?

I have a single story ranch style home that was built in the mid 1950's.

The exterior is stucco and I am getting proposals on getting it painted.
One of the beter painters in the area tells me that he sprays with a good
tip and another person is right behind him to backroll. He says he can roll
but it will take alot longer. He says that the spray / backroll yields good
results.

Another painter tells me that he only rolls and that it is better.

Is there much of a difference?


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  #2  
Old July 31st 08, 03:34 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair
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Posts: 4,938
Default Painting exterior stucco spray or roll?

On Jul 31, 9:15*am, "Tube Audio" wrote:
I have a single story ranch style home that was built in the mid 1950's.

The exterior is stucco and I am getting proposals on getting it painted.
One of the beter painters in the area tells me that he sprays with a good
tip and another person is right behind him to backroll. *He says he can roll
but it will take alot longer. *He says that the spray / backroll yields good
results.

Another painter tells me that he only rolls and that it is better.

Is there much of a difference?


Spray is quicker and easier just be sure of no wind and he has
liability ins, with a 2 mph wind I once got paint on a car 50 ft away.
He who sprays makes alot of money that day! Both ways are fine, things
have to be covered
  #3  
Old July 31st 08, 03:35 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair
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Posts: 5,054
Default Painting exterior stucco spray or roll?

In article ,
"Tube Audio" wrote:

I have a single story ranch style home that was built in the mid 1950's.

The exterior is stucco and I am getting proposals on getting it painted.
One of the beter painters in the area tells me that he sprays with a good
tip and another person is right behind him to backroll. He says he can roll
but it will take alot longer. He says that the spray / backroll yields good
results.

Another painter tells me that he only rolls and that it is better.

Is there much of a difference?


What, you're wandering in here with another "paint the stucco' query
after what we just went through? You're a brave man, or maybe foolish.
  #4  
Old July 31st 08, 03:41 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair
dpb
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Posts: 10,379
Default Painting exterior stucco spray or roll?

Smitty Two wrote:
....
What, you're wandering in here with another "paint the stucco' query ...


Yeah, I been wonder wots up w/ the recent spate of stucco, too...

Don't dare ask what he's intending to put on this stucco abode or do we?



--

  #5  
Old July 31st 08, 07:33 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair
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Posts: 43
Default Painting exterior stucco spray or roll?


"SteveB" toquerville@zionvistas wrote in message
...

"Tube Audio" wrote in message
...
I have a single story ranch style home that was built in the mid 1950's.

The exterior is stucco and I am getting proposals on getting it painted.
One of the beter painters in the area tells me that he sprays with a good
tip and another person is right behind him to backroll. He says he can
roll but it will take alot longer. He says that the spray / backroll
yields good results.

Another painter tells me that he only rolls and that it is better.

Is there much of a difference?


Here's an answer from a desert rat that lived in Las Vegas for fifty
years.

Spraying paint on stucco gives you better penetration and coverage into
all the crevices, as stucco is a very uneven surface. Some say you don't
have to backroll if you just spray thick, but someone who offers to
backroll obviously knows what they are doing and willing to take the extra
time. Backrolling also eliminates a lot of overlap lines that are visible
on the dried painted surface. There is no comparison between spraying and
rolling, except spraying will probably use more paint, but what's wrong
with that? No matter what you do, you will not get down into all the
crevices with a roller unless you load your roller with about a gallon of
paint each time, and you'll lose half of that to gravity and centrifugal
spin of the roller. Do the spray. If you really want to go better from
there, check out the elastomeric stucco paints, but they take a heavier
sprayer. These will flex and not show the small cracks associated with
stucco aging.

Just MHO, what do I know?

Steve


Painting stucco is like painting a cement sponge. Which is why it holds
moisture and the paint doesn't last.

Very simple.

  #6  
Old July 31st 08, 09:29 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair
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Posts: 812
Default Painting exterior stucco spray or roll?


"Tube Audio" wrote in message
...
I have a single story ranch style home that was built in the mid 1950's.

The exterior is stucco and I am getting proposals on getting it painted.
One of the beter painters in the area tells me that he sprays with a good
tip and another person is right behind him to backroll. He says he can
roll but it will take alot longer. He says that the spray / backroll
yields good results.

Another painter tells me that he only rolls and that it is better.

Is there much of a difference?


Here's an answer from a desert rat that lived in Las Vegas for fifty years.

Spraying paint on stucco gives you better penetration and coverage into all
the crevices, as stucco is a very uneven surface. Some say you don't have
to backroll if you just spray thick, but someone who offers to backroll
obviously knows what they are doing and willing to take the extra time.
Backrolling also eliminates a lot of overlap lines that are visible on the
dried painted surface. There is no comparison between spraying and rolling,
except spraying will probably use more paint, but what's wrong with that?
No matter what you do, you will not get down into all the crevices with a
roller unless you load your roller with about a gallon of paint each time,
and you'll lose half of that to gravity and centrifugal spin of the roller.
Do the spray. If you really want to go better from there, check out the
elastomeric stucco paints, but they take a heavier sprayer. These will flex
and not show the small cracks associated with stucco aging.

Just MHO, what do I know?

Steve


  #7  
Old July 31st 08, 09:30 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair
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Posts: 812
Default Painting exterior stucco spray or roll?


"dpb" wrote in message ...
Smitty Two wrote:
...
What, you're wandering in here with another "paint the stucco' query ...


Yeah, I been wonder wots up w/ the recent spate of stucco, too...

Don't dare ask what he's intending to put on this stucco abode or do we?



--


What you mean "WE", white man?



  #8  
Old July 31st 08, 10:10 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair
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Posts: 42
Default Painting exterior stucco spray or roll?

On Jul 31, 2:33*pm, "Billy Pilgrim" wrote:
"SteveB" toquerville@zionvistas wrote in message

...







"Tube Audio" wrote in message
. ..
I have a single story ranch style home that was built in the mid 1950's..


The exterior is stucco and I am getting proposals on getting it painted.
One of the beter painters in the area tells me that he sprays with a good
tip and another person is right behind him to backroll. *He says he can
roll but it will take alot longer. *He says that the spray / backroll
yields good results.


Another painter tells me that he only rolls and that it is better.


Is there much of a difference?


Here's an answer from a desert rat that lived in Las Vegas for fifty
years.


Spraying paint on stucco gives you better penetration and coverage into
all the crevices, as stucco is a very uneven surface. *Some say you don't
have to backroll if you just spray thick, but someone who offers to
backroll obviously knows what they are doing and willing to take the extra
time. Backrolling also eliminates a lot of overlap lines that are visible
on the dried painted surface. *There is no comparison between spraying and
rolling, except spraying will probably use more paint, but what's wrong
with that? No matter what you do, you will not get down into all the
crevices with a roller unless you load your roller with about a gallon of
paint each time, and you'll lose half of that to gravity and centrifugal
spin of the roller. Do the spray. *If you really want to go better from
there, check out the elastomeric stucco paints, but they take a heavier
sprayer. *These will flex and not show the small cracks associated with
stucco aging.


Just MHO, what do I know?


Steve


Painting stucco is like painting a cement sponge. Which is why it holds
moisture and the paint doesn't last.

Very simple.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


do not paint stucco. PERIOD. if you ever do ( with eg. latex exterior
paint) breathing ability of stucco will be impaired /suppressed and
you will het mold/fungus/dry rot in between stucco and the wall
  #9  
Old July 31st 08, 10:19 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair
Ron
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 984
Default Painting exterior stucco spray or roll?

On Jul 31, 2:33*pm, "Billy Pilgrim" wrote:

Painting stucco is like painting a cement sponge. Which is why it holds
moisture and the paint doesn't last.

Very simple.


What is your definition of "long"?

I have a room that was added on 12 yrs ago, which is stuccoed and the
original paint still looks fine.

  #10  
Old July 31st 08, 10:24 PM posted to alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 24
Default Painting exterior stucco spray or roll?


wrote in message
...
On Jul 31, 2:33 pm, "Billy Pilgrim" wrote:
"SteveB" toquerville@zionvistas wrote in message

...







"Tube Audio" wrote in message
. ..
I have a single story ranch style home that was built in the mid 1950's.


The exterior is stucco and I am getting proposals on getting it
painted.
One of the beter painters in the area tells me that he sprays with a
good
tip and another person is right behind him to backroll. He says he can
roll but it will take alot longer. He says that the spray / backroll
yields good results.


Another painter tells me that he only rolls and that it is better.


Is there much of a difference?


Here's an answer from a desert rat that lived in Las Vegas for fifty
years.


Spraying paint on stucco gives you better penetration and coverage into
all the crevices, as stucco is a very uneven surface. Some say you don't
have to backroll if you just spray thick, but someone who offers to
backroll obviously knows what they are doing and willing to take the
extra
time. Backrolling also eliminates a lot of overlap lines that are
visible
on the dried painted surface. There is no comparison between spraying
and
rolling, except spraying will probably use more paint, but what's wrong
with that? No matter what you do, you will not get down into all the
crevices with a roller unless you load your roller with about a gallon
of
paint each time, and you'll lose half of that to gravity and centrifugal
spin of the roller. Do the spray. If you really want to go better from
there, check out the elastomeric stucco paints, but they take a heavier
sprayer. These will flex and not show the small cracks associated with
stucco aging.


Just MHO, what do I know?


Steve


Painting stucco is like painting a cement sponge. Which is why it holds
moisture and the paint doesn't last.

Very simple.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


do not paint stucco. PERIOD. if you ever do ( with eg. latex exterior
paint) breathing ability of stucco will be impaired /suppressed and
you will het mold/fungus/dry rot in between stucco and the wall

================================================== ==

Preaching to the choir. To be honest. I never really knew why. All I
remember is the stucco houses that had been paint usually didn't hold up
well. After some Usenet kooks started to flame me, I looked into it and now
it makes perfect sense. It's like painting a sponge. Any water that gets in,
and it will, soaks the sponge causing the paint to peel. Also, potentially
causing damage to the sub-wall because the paint won't allow the stucco to
dry out like it's supposed to after a rain. Anybody that was seen a dark
stucco house after a rain would know what I'm talking about. The walls are
soaking wet and have to dry out.


 




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