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Weight of a railroad tie?



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 28th 08, 12:49 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Weight of a railroad tie?

How much does a railroad tie weigh? We are thinking of using some for a
landscaping project but are wondering how difficult they might be to handle.

Perce
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  #2  
Old April 28th 08, 12:58 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Weight of a railroad tie?

On Apr 27, 7:49�pm, "Percival P. Cassidy" wrote:
How much does a railroad tie weigh? We are thinking of using some for a
landscaping project but are wondering how difficult they might be to handle.

Perce


older ones were much heavier, perhaps it was the creosote?

i have a friend with a large retaining wall, perhaps 12 feet high 50
feet long,

how long do they last? home is about 30 years old, wall must be same
age...

they are thinking of selling...........

house needs lots of work,
  #3  
Old April 28th 08, 01:04 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Weight of a railroad tie?


"Percival P. Cassidy" wrote in message
...
How much does a railroad tie weigh? We are thinking of using some for a
landscaping project but are wondering how difficult they might be to
handle.

Perce


If you're referring to real RR ties, and not pressure treated landscape
ties, they're not only heavy, but they're dirty and messy, and I'd guess
about 100 lbs each. More important, they're soaked with creosote, which
stinks, and it's sticky, and you certainly won't easily get it out of your
clothes


  #4  
Old April 28th 08, 01:15 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Weight of a railroad tie?

On 04/27/08 08:04 pm RBM wrote:

"Percival P. Cassidy" wrote in message
...
How much does a railroad tie weigh? We are thinking of using some for a
landscaping project but are wondering how difficult they might be to
handle.


If you're referring to real RR ties, and not pressure treated landscape
ties, they're not only heavy, but they're dirty and messy, and I'd guess
about 100 lbs each. More important, they're soaked with creosote, which
stinks, and it's sticky, and you certainly won't easily get it out of your
clothes



I did rough calculations and guessed maybe 150 lbs. I know about the
creosote and have no problem with the smell. But are RR ties still
sticky by the time they are "pensioned off" by the railroads?

Perce
  #5  
Old April 28th 08, 01:16 AM posted to alt.home.repair
dpb
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Default Weight of a railroad tie?

Percival P. Cassidy wrote:
How much does a railroad tie weigh? We are thinking of using some for a
landscaping project but are wondering how difficult they might be to
handle.


Varies depending on age, species, etc., but can figure an used 8-1/2-ft
standard tie will be a minimum of 100-lb to an average of probably 125
or so. New may be 125 to as much as 175. I've been replacing some in
the feedlot fencing from the stockpile of used ones that has been here
for 20 years at least so they're dried out as they're gonna' get. Some
are relatively easy to handle, there are some I still can't carry by
myself but have to lift one end at a time...

You'll need a buddy w/ a strong back...

--
  #6  
Old April 28th 08, 01:24 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 2,681
Default Weight of a railroad tie?

Percival P. Cassidy wrote:
On 04/27/08 08:04 pm RBM wrote:

"Percival P. Cassidy" wrote in message
...

How much does a railroad tie weigh? We are thinking of using some for
a landscaping project but are wondering how difficult they might be
to handle.



If you're referring to real RR ties, and not pressure treated
landscape ties, they're not only heavy, but they're dirty and messy,
and I'd guess about 100 lbs each. More important, they're soaked with
creosote, which stinks, and it's sticky, and you certainly won't
easily get it out of your clothes




I did rough calculations and guessed maybe 150 lbs. I know about the
creosote and have no problem with the smell. But are RR ties still
sticky by the time they are "pensioned off" by the railroads?

Perce


'pends on how long they've been laying around. But I can tell you from
personal experience that unless you and several very good friends are
both large and in good shape, that trying to move them around by hand
will get real tiring real fast.

You'll need a chainsaw to cut 'em, too. Just make sure that there
aren't any spikes hiding in them.

nate

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  #7  
Old April 28th 08, 01:56 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 5,054
Default Weight of a railroad tie?

In article ,
"Percival P. Cassidy" wrote:

On 04/27/08 08:04 pm RBM wrote:

"Percival P. Cassidy" wrote in message
...
How much does a railroad tie weigh? We are thinking of using some for a
landscaping project but are wondering how difficult they might be to
handle.


If you're referring to real RR ties, and not pressure treated landscape
ties, they're not only heavy, but they're dirty and messy, and I'd guess
about 100 lbs each. More important, they're soaked with creosote, which
stinks, and it's sticky, and you certainly won't easily get it out of your
clothes



I did rough calculations and guessed maybe 150 lbs. I know about the
creosote and have no problem with the smell. But are RR ties still
sticky by the time they are "pensioned off" by the railroads?

Perce


I picked up a dozen or so a number of years back, and they weren't
sticky. And judging by the health of plants nearby, they also don't seem
to be leeching anything detrimental into the soil.

I don't remember them being all that heavy. 100 pounds isn't much for
two guys to handle readily.
  #8  
Old April 28th 08, 02:35 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 707
Default Weight of a railroad tie?

how long do they last? home is about 30 years old, wall must be same
age...


My house was built in 1986 and the front yard was landscaped with RR
ties. I'm in the central valley of CA (HOT, bone-dry summers; wet,
foggy, cool winters.

As of the last few years, the RR ties are deteriorating badly. Totally
infested with roaches and other bugs, albeit no termites.

I guess 22 yrs isn't bad, but the bug infestation isn't pleasant.

-Zz
  #9  
Old April 28th 08, 04:14 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 3,053
Default Weight of a railroad tie?

On Apr 27, 4:49*pm, "Percival P. Cassidy" wrote:
How much does a railroad tie weigh? We are thinking of using some for a
landscaping project but are wondering how difficult they might be to handle.

Perce


Depends. Youw ill run into some that are easy to handle, most will be
best at one end at a time and few in the "Dayum!" category. I did
fencing and retaining wall (100 ft x 5') high back in the early 80s.
Some of them are already rotted off, others are still rock solid.

Creosote - depends on how heavily treated. If you can smellit when
you pick them up, you will smell it on a hot day for severall years to
come. I would give mine a sniff test but the eweather isn't warm
enough yet. Don't recall smelling any last year though.

Ties make a cheap retaining wall (compared to alternatives) but have
thier drawbacks.

Harry K
  #10  
Old April 28th 08, 06:13 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 812
Default Weight of a railroad tie?


"Percival P. Cassidy" wrote in message
...
How much does a railroad tie weigh? We are thinking of using some for a
landscaping project but are wondering how difficult they might be to
handle.

Perce


There are all kinds. There are true railroad ties that were used as rail
beds, taken up, and sold. And of them, there are various widths, cross
sections, and methods of treatment for the various road beds they were
applied to.

Then there are landscaping ties. Those that are cut to the similar
dimensions, but that were never driven with spikes, nor were laden with
rails.

You have old used ties, and new ties that were intended for rail use, but
for some reason just not used. Then there are the modern look alikes that
are just for landscaping.

So, it's hard to give a one size fits all answer.

If you're just looking at them, try to look for even ties that aren't
warped, or overly laden with gook that preserves them. If you're looking at
truly used ties, you can turn the used side down, so look to see if the
clean side is presentable. Where I live, they go for eight to ten bucks
apiece.

Steve


 




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