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Roof repair alternatives



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 9th 07, 06:03 PM posted to alt.home.repair
Una
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Posts: 133
Default Roof repair alternatives

I am considering alternatives re how to repair an old, leaking roof.

The roof has a shallow pitch (4 in 12?) and a single layer of asphalt
shingles in bad condition. They are not curling much but they are
badly weathered and missing many edges. And there are plenty of leaks.
I don't know how long the roof has been leaking; it leaked already
when we bought the house last year. (We factored the cost of a new
roof into the purchase price.)

Part of the roof is over an attic. Under the shingles is tar paper
over sheathing. From inside the attic (crawl space) in many spots
the sheathing is cracked or broken. The roof has an 18" overhang
and neither soffits nor ridge are vented. The attic has gable ends
with vents but at one end the vent is covered with siding.

Another part of the roof is over an addition with a ceiling of
exposed rafters and tongue&groove boards. I don't know what lies
between the asphalt shingles and the ceiling. Probably not much,
because the addition gets very cold in winter and hot in summer.

The house is in very sunny and dry New Mexico at 7000' elevation
(so nights are cold). It has no AC nor a swamp cooler but is cool
in summer thanks to deciduous trees that overhang the west side
of the house (blocking afternoon sun) and good cross ventilation.
The climate is "high desert", so heavy snows, monsoon rains, and
significant hail storms are normal.

A recommended local roofer proposes to strip the old shingles then
install new shingles. I anticipate once the old shingles are off
I will hear that the sheathing needs repairs and the roof needs to
be vented. Should I go with stripping the old shingles? Should I
plan to replace the sheathing?

Una

Ads
  #2  
Old December 9th 07, 06:10 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 6,205
Default Roof repair alternatives

On Dec 9, 1:03�pm, (Una) wrote:
I am considering alternatives re how to repair an old, leaking roof.

The roof has a shallow pitch (4 in 12?) and a single layer of asphalt
shingles in bad condition. �They are not curling much but they are
badly weathered and missing many edges. �And there are plenty of leaks.
I don't know how long the roof has been leaking; �it leaked already
when we bought the house last year. �(We factored the cost of a new
roof into the purchase price.)

Part of the roof is over an attic. �Under the shingles is tar paper
over sheathing. �From inside the attic (crawl space) in many spots
the sheathing is cracked or broken. �The roof has an 18" overhang
and neither soffits nor ridge are vented. �The attic has gable ends
with vents but at one end the vent is covered with siding.

Another part of the roof is over an addition with a ceiling of
exposed rafters and tongue&groove boards. �I don't know what lies
between the asphalt shingles and the ceiling. �Probably not much,
because the addition gets very cold in winter and hot in summer. �

The house is in very sunny and dry New Mexico at 7000' elevation
(so nights are cold). �It has no AC nor a swamp cooler but is cool
in summer thanks to deciduous trees that overhang the west side
of the house (blocking afternoon sun) and good cross ventilation.
The climate is "high desert", so heavy snows, monsoon rains, and
significant hail storms are normal.

A recommended local roofer proposes to strip the old shingles then
install new shingles. �I anticipate once the old shingles are off
I will hear that the sheathing needs repairs and the roof needs to
be vented. �Should I go with stripping the old shingles? �Should I
plan to replace the sheathing?

� � � � Una


yeah i would if you plan on living there very long, and even if you
dont it will be a big issue at resale.

better ventilation longer life and 2 layers isnt a good idea, its a
cheap out approach.

besides do it right do it once and forget about it...........
  #3  
Old December 9th 07, 06:18 PM posted to alt.home.repair
tom
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Posts: 590
Default Roof repair alternatives

On Dec 9, 11:03 am, (Una) wrote:
I am considering alternatives re how to repair an old, leaking roof.

The roof has a shallow pitch (4 in 12?) and a single layer of asphalt
shingles in bad condition. They are not curling much but they are
badly weathered and missing many edges. And there are plenty of leaks.
I don't know how long the roof has been leaking; it leaked already
when we bought the house last year. (We factored the cost of a new
roof into the purchase price.)

Part of the roof is over an attic. Under the shingles is tar paper
over sheathing. From inside the attic (crawl space) in many spots
the sheathing is cracked or broken. The roof has an 18" overhang
and neither soffits nor ridge are vented. The attic has gable ends
with vents but at one end the vent is covered with siding.

Another part of the roof is over an addition with a ceiling of
exposed rafters and tongue&groove boards. I don't know what lies
between the asphalt shingles and the ceiling. Probably not much,
because the addition gets very cold in winter and hot in summer.

The house is in very sunny and dry New Mexico at 7000' elevation
(so nights are cold). It has no AC nor a swamp cooler but is cool
in summer thanks to deciduous trees that overhang the west side
of the house (blocking afternoon sun) and good cross ventilation.
The climate is "high desert", so heavy snows, monsoon rains, and
significant hail storms are normal.

A recommended local roofer proposes to strip the old shingles then
install new shingles. I anticipate once the old shingles are off
I will hear that the sheathing needs repairs and the roof needs to
be vented. Should I go with stripping the old shingles? Should I
plan to replace the sheathing?

Una


You anticipate correctly. Tear-off, repair/replace decking and add
ventilation. Maybe insulate where possible? Tom
  #4  
Old December 9th 07, 10:31 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1,490
Default Roof repair alternatives

On Sun, 09 Dec 2007 18:03:03 GMT, (Una) wrote:

I am considering alternatives re how to repair an old, leaking roof.

The roof has a shallow pitch (4 in 12?) and a single layer of asphalt
shingles in bad condition. They are not curling much but they are
badly weathered and missing many edges. And there are plenty of leaks.
I don't know how long the roof has been leaking; it leaked already
when we bought the house last year. (We factored the cost of a new
roof into the purchase price.)

Part of the roof is over an attic. Under the shingles is tar paper
over sheathing. From inside the attic (crawl space) in many spots
the sheathing is cracked or broken. The roof has an 18" overhang
and neither soffits nor ridge are vented. The attic has gable ends
with vents but at one end the vent is covered with siding.

Another part of the roof is over an addition with a ceiling of
exposed rafters and tongue&groove boards. I don't know what lies
between the asphalt shingles and the ceiling. Probably not much,
because the addition gets very cold in winter and hot in summer.

The house is in very sunny and dry New Mexico at 7000' elevation
(so nights are cold). It has no AC nor a swamp cooler but is cool
in summer thanks to deciduous trees that overhang the west side
of the house (blocking afternoon sun) and good cross ventilation.
The climate is "high desert", so heavy snows, monsoon rains, and
significant hail storms are normal.

A recommended local roofer proposes to strip the old shingles then
install new shingles. I anticipate once the old shingles are off
I will hear that the sheathing needs repairs and the roof needs to
be vented. Should I go with stripping the old shingles? Should I
plan to replace the sheathing?

Una


Remove shingles and tar paper, do necessary repairs, add vents. Should
last 20 years, maybe more. Layering over old shingles might over
burden your roof when it needs that strength to hold the snow.
  #5  
Old December 10th 07, 01:07 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 161
Default Roof repair alternatives

On Sun, 09 Dec 2007 18:03:03 +0000, Una wrote:

I am considering alternatives re how to repair an old, leaking roof.

The roof has a shallow pitch (4 in 12?) and a single layer of asphalt
shingles in bad condition. They are not curling much but they are badly
weathered and missing many edges. And there are plenty of leaks. I
don't know how long the roof has been leaking; it leaked already when
we bought the house last year. (We factored the cost of a new roof into
the purchase price.)

Part of the roof is over an attic. Under the shingles is tar paper over
sheathing. From inside the attic (crawl space) in many spots the
sheathing is cracked or broken. The roof has an 18" overhang and
neither soffits nor ridge are vented. The attic has gable ends with
vents but at one end the vent is covered with siding.

Another part of the roof is over an addition with a ceiling of exposed
rafters and tongue&groove boards. I don't know what lies between the
asphalt shingles and the ceiling. Probably not much, because the
addition gets very cold in winter and hot in summer.

The house is in very sunny and dry New Mexico at 7000' elevation (so
nights are cold). It has no AC nor a swamp cooler but is cool in summer
thanks to deciduous trees that overhang the west side of the house
(blocking afternoon sun) and good cross ventilation. The climate is
"high desert", so heavy snows, monsoon rains, and significant hail
storms are normal.

A recommended local roofer proposes to strip the old shingles then
install new shingles. I anticipate once the old shingles are off I will
hear that the sheathing needs repairs and the roof needs to be vented.
Should I go with stripping the old shingles? Should I plan to replace
the sheathing?

Una


FEMA's approach has always been a large blue tarp.
  #6  
Old December 10th 07, 04:24 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 148
Default Roof repair alternatives

Una one added part. Before you contract, find out from the various folks
how much it will cost per panel that may have to be replaced. Thats the
hidden 'gotcha' and there can be HUGE differences but once you start, you
have no choice but the follow through. The job has to be finished pretty
quick once started.

You know you have leaks, so you know you have damage. Factor that in, and
the earlier fixed, the cheaper it is.


  #7  
Old December 10th 07, 05:43 PM posted to alt.home.repair
Una
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Posts: 133
Default Roof repair alternatives

Cshenk wrote:
Una one added part. Before you contract, find out from the various folks
how much it will cost per panel that may have to be replaced. Thats the
hidden 'gotcha' and there can be HUGE differences but once you start, you
have no choice but the follow through. The job has to be finished pretty
quick once started.


Yup. My thought exactly. I am rather disturbed that the proposal did
not address this likely contingency.

The main roof has sheathing boards now. Can they be mixed with plywood
or OSB underlayment or will I need to stick with boards?


You know you have leaks, so you know you have damage. Factor that in, and
the earlier fixed, the cheaper it is.


I hear you. Deferred maintenance usually is *expensive* maintenance,
plus there is the added aggro factor of living with the problem. I do
not like surprise puddles on my kitchen floor. Nor falling ceilings
nor rot in the walls...

Una

  #8  
Old December 10th 07, 06:56 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 2,491
Default Roof repair alternatives

Cshenk wrote:

Una one added part. Before you contract, find out from the various folks
how much it will cost per panel that may have to be replaced. Thats the
hidden 'gotcha' and there can be HUGE differences but once you start, you
have no choice but the follow through. The job has to be finished pretty
quick once started.

You know you have leaks, so you know you have damage. Factor that in, and
the earlier fixed, the cheaper it is.




I would also find out the charge for disposal, and have all charges
stated in the bid, along with start and completion times. Ridge vents
should not be costly. There is a formula for attic ventillation. I
believe it is 1 sq ft roof vent per 300 sq ft of attic _floor_ area.
Warm, dry weather is best time.
  #9  
Old December 10th 07, 08:30 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 48
Default Roof repair alternatives

On Dec 9, 1:03 pm, (Una) wrote:
I am considering alternatives re how to repair an old, leaking roof.

The roof has a shallow pitch (4 in 12?) and a single layer of asphalt
shingles in bad condition. They are not curling much but they are
badly weathered and missing many edges. And there are plenty of leaks.
I don't know how long the roof has been leaking; it leaked already
when we bought the house last year. (We factored the cost of a new
roof into the purchase price.)

Part of the roof is over an attic. Under the shingles is tar paper
over sheathing. From inside the attic (crawl space) in many spots
the sheathing is cracked or broken. The roof has an 18" overhang
and neither soffits nor ridge are vented. The attic has gable ends
with vents but at one end the vent is covered with siding.

Another part of the roof is over an addition with a ceiling of
exposed rafters and tongue&groove boards. I don't know what lies
between the asphalt shingles and the ceiling. Probably not much,
because the addition gets very cold in winter and hot in summer.

The house is in very sunny and dry New Mexico at 7000' elevation
(so nights are cold). It has no AC nor a swamp cooler but is cool
in summer thanks to deciduous trees that overhang the west side
of the house (blocking afternoon sun) and good cross ventilation.
The climate is "high desert", so heavy snows, monsoon rains, and
significant hail storms are normal.

A recommended local roofer proposes to strip the old shingles then
install new shingles. I anticipate once the old shingles are off
I will hear that the sheathing needs repairs and the roof needs to
be vented. Should I go with stripping the old shingles? Should I
plan to replace the sheathing?

Una


Ok...here maby an alternative for you to at least consider....no, not
move, LOL.

Look into a METAL roof.

They are more expensive than a traditional asphalt shingle..but
consider these factors:

The tear-off costs are money that largely goes away when the
contractor leaves, because the difference between a nail over and a
tearoff is largely in the LABOR costs and dump fees..material costs
are not significantly higher, (felt, felt nails, maybe ice guard).....

So some of the metal roof costs are off set by the labor difference
becasue you do not need to tearoff an existing roof to install a metal
roof!

Also..a SQUARE of metal roofing weighs approx 80#'s. That is the
weight of one BUNDLE of shingles and one bundles times THREE makes a
square, so 80#s vs 240 -350 per square! SO long-term weight factor is
in metal roofings favor!

Now here is the most intriguing part...metal roofing can be installed
over non-traditional roof decking (open spanning)...so depending on
your existing deck..you may be able to SAVE all the extra carpentry
dollars and labor..so again...that offsets some more of the metals
cost!

A metal roof lasts longer than shingles, has a class 4 hail rating vs
class 2 in traditional 30 yr dimensional shingles, resists wind OVER
120 MPH vs 80 mph for 30 years, there are also tax benefits for metal
roof owners that asphalt shingles cannot get
....AND.....some insurers offer homeowner discounts for installing a
metal roof....

Finally there is this to remember.....it's a METAL roof...VERY
COOL...and very value added to your home!!!!

visit here to learn more.
http://atas.com
http://www.hometips.com/cs-protected...metalroof.html
http://www.metalroofing.com


GOOD LUCK!
  #10  
Old December 10th 07, 08:36 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 30
Default Roof repair alternatives

Roofing in los angeles services all jobs grate services call us at 818
502 2058
or visit us at http://www.toolmannet.com

 




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