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Dual sump pumps



 
 
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  #11  
Old October 3rd 07, 08:07 AM posted to alt.home.repair
mm
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,843
Default Dual sump pumps

On Tue, 02 Oct 2007 17:58:17 -0700, "
wrote:


just install a second pit, easy to do and have 2 completely seperate
pits with two completely seperate pumps draining into 2 completely
seperate discharge lines.


But what about the feed lines to the sump? The perforated plastic
pipe that surrounds the foundation? How do you get that water into
the other sump? And without removing it from the first sump?

all redundant all the time add a batery
back up pump to one just in case.

A couple thoughts, it amazes me how many people have sump pumps that
could drain to daylight! at least in a overflow pump failure mode. if
you could, get a backhoe to dio some digging gravity is really
reliable.

another thing you should investigate why so much water in a heavy
rain? leaking downspout drain broken pipes? clogged gutters filled
with debris? could you add a french drain somewhere to minimize flow
somehow?

sump pumps work awesome, at least till they fail but you need to look
at this as a entire groundwater control system.

the less water traveling thru your sump the better!


Ads
  #12  
Old October 3rd 07, 06:07 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,205
Default Dual sump pumps

On Oct 3, 3:07?am, mm wrote:
On Tue, 02 Oct 2007 17:58:17 -0700, "

wrote:

just install a second pit, easy to do and have 2 completely seperate
pits with two completely seperate pumps draining into 2 completely
seperate discharge lines.


But what about the feed lines to the sump? The perforated plastic
pipe that surrounds the foundation? How do you get that water into
the other sump? And without removing it from the first sump?



all redundant all the time add a batery
back up pump to one just in case.


A couple thoughts, it amazes me how many people have sump pumps that
could drain to daylight! at least in a overflow pump failure mode. if
you could, get a backhoe to dio some digging gravity is really
reliable.


another thing you should investigate why so much water in a heavy
rain? leaking downspout drain broken pipes? clogged gutters filled
with debris? could you add a french drain somewhere to minimize flow
somehow?


sump pumps work awesome, at least till they fail but you need to look
at this as a entire groundwater control system.


the less water traveling thru your sump the better!- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


generally the perforated pipe runs around the perimeter walls. so pick
a convenient spot cut concrete and break into existing line install
second sump and pump, its not high tech just hard work. digging into
concrete etc........

  #13  
Old October 3rd 07, 07:07 PM posted to alt.home.repair
mm
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,843
Default Dual sump pumps

On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 04:25:36 GMT, "Toller" wrote:


"Smarty" wrote in message
news:32xMi.1271$R%1.1117@trndny06...
I have a considerable amount of water enter my basement sump pump pit when
it rains heavily, and a husky submersible pump which can pump several
thousand gallons of water per hour if needed when the pit begins to fill.


I had a similar problem, and my solution was to move. Well actually that
was my second solution; the first was to install a second sump.
I put a pump in the second sump with a water powered backup, and then put a
battery powered backup on the original sump.
Amazingly, I didn't have any problem selling the house for a good price,
despite all the sump pumps.


It sounds like you had four! sump pumps. Wow.

Otoh, maybe he thought, Good, he has 4 sump pumps. That ought to be
enough for anything.

Or maybe he didn't think at all.

  #14  
Old October 3rd 07, 08:12 PM posted to alt.home.repair
EXT
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,645
Default Dual sump pumps

Simpler, install the sump beside the old one and add a connecting pipe to
collect the overflow.

wrote in message
ps.com...
On Oct 3, 3:07?am, mm wrote:
On Tue, 02 Oct 2007 17:58:17 -0700, "

wrote:

just install a second pit, easy to do and have 2 completely seperate
pits with two completely seperate pumps draining into 2 completely
seperate discharge lines.


But what about the feed lines to the sump? The perforated plastic
pipe that surrounds the foundation? How do you get that water into
the other sump? And without removing it from the first sump?



all redundant all the time add a batery
back up pump to one just in case.


A couple thoughts, it amazes me how many people have sump pumps that
could drain to daylight! at least in a overflow pump failure mode. if
you could, get a backhoe to dio some digging gravity is really
reliable.


another thing you should investigate why so much water in a heavy
rain? leaking downspout drain broken pipes? clogged gutters filled
with debris? could you add a french drain somewhere to minimize flow
somehow?


sump pumps work awesome, at least till they fail but you need to look
at this as a entire groundwater control system.


the less water traveling thru your sump the better!- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


generally the perforated pipe runs around the perimeter walls. so pick
a convenient spot cut concrete and break into existing line install
second sump and pump, its not high tech just hard work. digging into
concrete etc........



  #15  
Old October 4th 07, 03:04 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 107
Default Dual sump pumps


wrote in message
oups.com...
On Oct 2, 5:33?pm, "EXT" wrote:
If you have room in your sump for both pumps, put them in side by side,
otherwise it will be impossible to remove a lower bad one without
shutting
down the one above it.

Do not wire them both into the same circuit. Keep two circuits in case
one
pump quits and blows the breaker on its line.

Pipe both sumps into separate discharge lines. Don't connect them
together
except at a point where they both discharge into a drain line that is
much
larger than the pipes from the pump. 4" or 6" would make a good drainage
line to take both pumps.

The alternator switching method sounds good.

"Smarty" wrote in message

news:32xMi.1271$R%1.1117@trndny06...



I have a considerable amount of water enter my basement sump pump pit
when
it rains heavily, and a husky submersible pump which can pump several
thousand gallons of water per hour if needed when the pit begins to
fill.
The pump is powered by 110V current, backed up by an automatic emergency
(natural gas powered) generator, so I feel quite confident I will be
able
to pump water under most conditions.


The concern I have is if the pump fails.


I want to install a second pump which will kick in if the water level
rises in the pit high enough to trigger it. My current thought would be
to
mount it above the current pump, and perhaps share the same outlet /
discharge pipe. I'm not sure this is a correct or optimal arrangement,
or
if there is some better way of hooking up a second / backup pump. An
alternative would be to fit 2 pumps at the same height into the pit,
let
both operate whenever water level rises, and then assume that either or
both of the pumps will be working when I really need them.


The basement is finished with a lot of relatively expensive tools,
furniture, etc. so I want this to be done right. I welcome any advice
or
opinions, and thank you in advance for your assistance.


Smarty- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


just install a second pit, easy to do and have 2 completely seperate
pits with two completely seperate pumps draining into 2 completely
seperate discharge lines. all redundant all the time add a batery
back up pump to one just in case.

A couple thoughts, it amazes me how many people have sump pumps that
could drain to daylight! at least in a overflow pump failure mode. if
you could, get a backhoe to dio some digging gravity is really
reliable.

another thing you should investigate why so much water in a heavy
rain? leaking downspout drain broken pipes? clogged gutters filled
with debris? could you add a french drain somewhere to minimize flow
somehow?

sump pumps work awesome, at least till they fail but you need to look
at this as a entire groundwater control system.

the less water traveling thru your sump the better!

you might try putting in some good sized french drains if you can get access
to the source of the water. that would be my preferred fix


  #16  
Old March 7th 14, 07:44 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default Dual sump pumps

replying to Smarty, Arnold2303 wrote:
nobody wrote:

I have a considerable amount of water enter my basement sump pump pit when
it rains heavily, and a husky submersible pump which can pump several
thousand gallons of water per hour if needed when the pit begins to fill.
The pump is powered by 110V current, backed up by an automatic emergency
(natural gas powered) generator, so I feel quite confident I will be able

to
pump water under most conditions.
The concern I have is if the pump fails.
I want to install a second pump which will kick in if the water level

rises
in the pit high enough to trigger it. My current thought would be to mount
it above the current pump, and perhaps share the same outlet / discharge
pipe. I'm not sure this is a correct or optimal arrangement, or if there

is
some better way of hooking up a second / backup pump. An alternative would
be to fit 2 pumps at the same height into the pit, let both operate

whenever
water level rises, and then assume that either or both of the pumps will

be
working when I really need them.
The basement is finished with a lot of relatively expensive tools,
furniture, etc. so I want this to be done right. I welcome any advice or
opinions, and thank you in advance for your assistance.
Smarty




SMARTY, did you ever install your dual sumps? How did it work out. I am
in your situation... I have a natural gas backup generator. I want to get
a backup sump fore same reasons you have/had.




--


--


--


  #17  
Old March 7th 14, 09:28 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 849
Default Dual sump pumps

Two pumps, separate supply electricity if possible. check valves in each discharge into a comon pipe. Just set the float switch on the backup pump to go on at a higher water level. This isn't rocket science, just basic plumbing and electricity.

I have two pumps like this, plus a water-powered jet-like system as a final backup if the electricity and the back-up electricity both fail. Each comes on at a successively higher water level.
  #18  
Old March 7th 14, 09:50 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11,130
Default Dual sump pumps

On Fri, 07 Mar 2014 19:44:01 +0000, Arnold2303
wrote:

replying to Smarty, Arnold2303 wrote:
nobody wrote:

I have a considerable amount of water enter my basement sump pump pit when
it rains heavily, and a husky submersible pump which can pump several
thousand gallons of water per hour if needed when the pit begins to fill.
The pump is powered by 110V current, backed up by an automatic emergency
(natural gas powered) generator, so I feel quite confident I will be able

to
pump water under most conditions.
The concern I have is if the pump fails.
I want to install a second pump which will kick in if the water level

rises
in the pit high enough to trigger it. My current thought would be to mount
it above the current pump, and perhaps share the same outlet / discharge
pipe. I'm not sure this is a correct or optimal arrangement, or if there

is
some better way of hooking up a second / backup pump. An alternative would
be to fit 2 pumps at the same height into the pit, let both operate

whenever
water level rises, and then assume that either or both of the pumps will

be
working when I really need them.
The basement is finished with a lot of relatively expensive tools,
furniture, etc. so I want this to be done right. I welcome any advice or
opinions, and thank you in advance for your assistance.
Smarty




SMARTY, did you ever install your dual sumps? How did it work out. I am
in your situation... I have a natural gas backup generator. I want to get
a backup sump fore same reasons you have/had.



I would definitely have separate discharge pipes installed, and run
the 2 pumps on sparate circuits. I would set the float switch on one
pump a bit higher than the other. I would LIKELY use 2 different sized
pumps - the low level pump being slightly lower capacity than the high
level pump. For most of the year your, say, 1/3 HP pump can handle the
flow with no problem - and runs on lower current, with fewer cycles.
If the little guy cannot do the job, big brother ( 1/2hp or more)
kicks in - and if the little guy fails, big brother is up to the job,
regardless.
You NEED separate circuits so if the one pump fails and draws
excessive current, tripping the breaker, the second pump is not
impacted. You need separate discharges so if one gets blocked, making
the one pump in-effective, the second pump still has a chance. Tying
both pumps to one discharge means if the discharge gets plugged the
one pump just pumps the water back through the other pump - right back
to the sump where it started.

--


--


  #19  
Old March 8th 14, 02:35 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 917
Default Dual sump pumps

On 3/7/2014 4:50 PM, wrote:
On Fri, 07 Mar 2014 19:44:01 +0000, Arnold2303
wrote:

replying to Smarty, Arnold2303 wrote:
nobody wrote:

I have a considerable amount of water enter my basement sump pump pit when
it rains heavily, and a husky submersible pump which can pump several
thousand gallons of water per hour if needed when the pit begins to fill.
The pump is powered by 110V current, backed up by an automatic emergency
(natural gas powered) generator, so I feel quite confident I will be able

to
pump water under most conditions.
The concern I have is if the pump fails.
I want to install a second pump which will kick in if the water level

rises
in the pit high enough to trigger it. My current thought would be to mount
it above the current pump, and perhaps share the same outlet / discharge
pipe. I'm not sure this is a correct or optimal arrangement, or if there

is
some better way of hooking up a second / backup pump. An alternative would
be to fit 2 pumps at the same height into the pit, let both operate

whenever
water level rises, and then assume that either or both of the pumps will

be
working when I really need them.
The basement is finished with a lot of relatively expensive tools,
furniture, etc. so I want this to be done right. I welcome any advice or
opinions, and thank you in advance for your assistance.
Smarty




SMARTY, did you ever install your dual sumps? How did it work out. I am
in your situation... I have a natural gas backup generator. I want to get
a backup sump fore same reasons you have/had.



I would definitely have separate discharge pipes installed, and run
the 2 pumps on sparate circuits. I would set the float switch on one
pump a bit higher than the other. I would LIKELY use 2 different sized
pumps - the low level pump being slightly lower capacity than the high
level pump. For most of the year your, say, 1/3 HP pump can handle the
flow with no problem - and runs on lower current, with fewer cycles.
If the little guy cannot do the job, big brother ( 1/2hp or more)
kicks in - and if the little guy fails, big brother is up to the job,
regardless.
You NEED separate circuits so if the one pump fails and draws
excessive current, tripping the breaker, the second pump is not
impacted. You need separate discharges so if one gets blocked, making
the one pump in-effective, the second pump still has a chance. Tying
both pumps to one discharge means if the discharge gets plugged the
one pump just pumps the water back through the other pump - right back
to the sump where it started.


All good points. In my old house, I had an AC pump and a DC battery
operated pump. Both were submersible. As mentioned, the AC pump was
set to kick in 1st and at the higher level, the DC pump. I had 2
separate discharge pipes. Outside, the pipes, loosely, went into a 4",
running downhill to the back of the yard. By loosely, I mean, not
actually connected. If something should freeze, the water would just
bubble up about 3 or 4' from the house. But with the good slope that I
had, it never froze up. In my present house, living on a mountain, I
have no sump. A friend once asked what I would do if water went into
the basement. As one side is at ground level, I told him that I would
just open the door and let gravity take over.

  #20  
Old March 8th 14, 03:44 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,591
Default Dual sump pumps

On Fri, 7 Mar 2014 13:28:41 -0800 (PST), "
wrote:

Two pumps, separate supply electricity if possible. check valves in each discharge into a comon pipe. Just set the float switch on the backup pump to go on at a higher water level. This isn't rocket science, just basic plumbing and electricity.

I have two pumps like this, plus a water-powered jet-like system as a final backup


Is this one a BasePump, or is there another brand of waterpowered
sumppump?

Thanks.

if the electricity and the back-up electricity both fail. Each comes on at a successively higher water level.


 




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