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convert outlet from 230V to 115V



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 15th 07, 01:29 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default convert outlet from 230V to 115V

I purchased a thru-the-wall A/C unit that runs 115V to replace an out
A/C and didn't realized the old ran on 230V. Is there an easy way to
convert the 230V outlet to 115V?

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  #2  
Old June 15th 07, 01:51 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1,069
Default convert outlet from 230V to 115V

I assume this a US question.

Yes and no. The very fact that you needed to ask sounds like this
might be a bit too technical for you.

220 volts does not require a neutral.
110 absolutely must have.
Both should have a ground.

How many wires and what colors in your receptacle? Let's assume
you have red/black/white/green. Use a volt tester and check the
voltages:

between red and black you should get 220
between red and white you should get 110
between black and white you should get 110
between white and green you should get none.

If all this is true, replace the existing receptacle using either
blk or red on the brass screw / white on the silver screw / green
on the green screw / cap off the unused blk or red (or better,
take it off at the breaker).

If this is not what you have, hire an electrician.

--
______________________________
Keep the whole world singing . . . .
DanG (remove the sevens)




wrote in message
ps.com...
I purchased a thru-the-wall A/C unit that runs 115V to replace an
out
A/C and didn't realized the old ran on 230V. Is there an easy
way to
convert the 230V outlet to 115V?



  #4  
Old June 15th 07, 02:00 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 6,380
Default convert outlet from 230V to 115V

In article om, wrote:
I purchased a thru-the-wall A/C unit that runs 115V to replace an out
A/C and didn't realized the old ran on 230V. Is there an easy way to
convert the 230V outlet to 115V?


Probably, but that depends partly on the amperage rating of the existing
circuit, and that of the new A/C unit. If the new unit is rated at higher
amperage than the existing circuit (e.g. you have a 15A circuit, and a 17A air
conditioner), you'll need to replace everything.

BTW -- it's 120 / 240 now. Hasn't been 115 / 230 for a long, long time.

Assuming that the amperage ratings match up, here's how you can go about it:

First, obtain a 120V receptacle of the proper rating. You might need a 20A
receptacle, depending on what the new A/C requires.

Next, test the outlet with a circuit tester or voltmeter to verify that it's
live. Turn off the circuit breaker and test it again, to verify that it's
dead. (This protects you against the possibility that a faulty tester is
incorrectly showing a live circuit to be dead.)

Then remove the existing receptacle from the box in the wall -- DON'T
disconnect any wires from it yet -- and look at what's connected to it, and
what other wires may be present in the box.

Most likely, there will be three wires connected to the receptacle (black,
white, and bare), and no other wires present. If not, STOP NOW, and post here
again, describing what you *do* have -- and ignore the rest of my reply.

Remove all three wires from the existing 240V receptacle, and connect them to
the new 120V receptacle as follows:
- black to the brass-colored screw
- white to the silver-colored screw
- bare to the green screw
and install the receptacle in the box in the wall.

Take the cover off the circuit breaker panel. Disconnect the white wire from
the circuit breaker for this circuit (leaving the black wire in place).
Connect the white wire to the neutral bus bar in the breaker panel. (This is a
long bar with many screw terminals, that already has numerous white wires
connected to it.)

Turn the breaker back on, and check the new receptacle with one of those
plug-in circuit testers that shows you whether it's wired correctly. Or test
with a voltmeter: you should see 120V between hot and neutral, 120V between
hot and ground, and 0V between neutral and ground.

If everything tests correctly, put a cover plate on the receptacle, plug in
your A/C, and enjoy the cool.


--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

It's time to throw all their damned tea in the harbor again.
  #6  
Old June 15th 07, 02:27 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 267
Default convert outlet from 230V to 115V

On Jun 14, 10:23 pm, mm wrote:
On Thu, 14 Jun 2007 17:29:57 -0700, wrote:
I purchased a thru-the-wall A/C unit that runs 115V to replace an out
A/C and didn't realized the old ran on 230V. Is there an easy way to
convert the 230V outlet to 115V?


If I recall correctly, 220v ACs are more efficient than 110. CAn you
return the one you have and get one that works on 220/30/40.

(Doug, I live in the 110/220 world and don't plan to move until I
reach the Next World.)


IIRC, if you calculate the actual rms voltage, a "110" or "120" volt
line is actually 117v. Of course this is nominal, since it excludes
noise and IR drops.

So, yer both right.

J

  #9  
Old June 18th 07, 07:57 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 857
Default convert outlet from 230V to 115V

According to Mark Lloyd :
On Fri, 15 Jun 2007 06:27:59 -0700, wrote:

On Jun 14, 10:23 pm, mm wrote:
On Thu, 14 Jun 2007 17:29:57 -0700, wrote:
I purchased a thru-the-wall A/C unit that runs 115V to replace an out
A/C and didn't realized the old ran on 230V. Is there an easy way to
convert the 230V outlet to 115V?

If I recall correctly, 220v ACs are more efficient than 110. CAn you
return the one you have and get one that works on 220/30/40.

(Doug, I live in the 110/220 world and don't plan to move until I
reach the Next World.)


IIRC, if you calculate the actual rms voltage, a "110" or "120" volt
line is actually 117v. Of course this is nominal, since it excludes
noise and IR drops.


How would you get that?

BTW, my outlets usually supply exactly 120V RMS.


Unloaded.

Power specifications take into account permissible voltage drop
under load. The permissible voltage drop includes the +/- 5%
tolerance or so permitted at your service panel's 120/240V
and the 5% or so voltage drop permitted over the house wiring
and supply cords.

Which basically means that house power is allowed to be (by code
and regulation) anywhere between about 110V and 130V.

In other words, some people call it 110V, others call it 120V,
and some people pick numbers in between. And of course, most
volt meters aren't very good at this accuracy on AC house power
either.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  #10  
Old June 19th 07, 01:49 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1,963
Default convert outlet from 230V to 115V

On Mon, 18 Jun 2007 18:57:11 -0000, (Chris
Lewis) wrote:

According to Mark Lloyd :
On Fri, 15 Jun 2007 06:27:59 -0700,
wrote:

On Jun 14, 10:23 pm, mm wrote:
On Thu, 14 Jun 2007 17:29:57 -0700, wrote:
I purchased a thru-the-wall A/C unit that runs 115V to replace an out
A/C and didn't realized the old ran on 230V. Is there an easy way to
convert the 230V outlet to 115V?

If I recall correctly, 220v ACs are more efficient than 110. CAn you
return the one you have and get one that works on 220/30/40.

(Doug, I live in the 110/220 world and don't plan to move until I
reach the Next World.)

IIRC, if you calculate the actual rms voltage, a "110" or "120" volt
line is actually 117v. Of course this is nominal, since it excludes
noise and IR drops.


How would you get that?

BTW, my outlets usually supply exactly 120V RMS.


Unloaded.

Power specifications take into account permissible voltage drop
under load. The permissible voltage drop includes the +/- 5%
tolerance or so permitted at your service panel's 120/240V
and the 5% or so voltage drop permitted over the house wiring
and supply cords.

Which basically means that house power is allowed to be (by code
and regulation) anywhere between about 110V and 130V.

In other words, some people call it 110V, others call it 120V,
and some people pick numbers in between. And of course, most
volt meters aren't very good at this accuracy on AC house power
either.


OK, about the voltage drop and permissible voltage ranges. However
that doesn't seem to explain how you got that specific number (117).
Are you measuring peak voltage somewhere and calculating from that?

The outlets in my house are normally supplying 120V with no load
(other than the kill-a-watt meter). Where is the 117V in that?

BTW, The voltage numbers I remember hearing about are 110V, 115V,
117V, 118V, 120V, 120V and 220V, 230V, 235V, 240V.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"So far as I can remember, there is not one word
in the Gospels in praise of intelligence."
--Bertrand Russell
 




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