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HEATILATOR GNDC36 Fireplace - Need Help



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 8th 07, 09:15 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 86
Default HEATILATOR GNDC36 Fireplace - Need Help

I have a HEATILATOR GNDC36 Fireplace running on propane.
I will try to describe it.
It has a vertical stack to the roof ending with a terminator cap.
It is a direct vent model, using room air, and has a standing pilot
ignition. The gas control has the usual thermocouple and thermopile
arrangement. The direct venting consists of a built-in fan that draws
room air at the bottom, blowing the air upward behind the heating
chamber and back out the top into the room, thus giving warm air.
It has a plate glass removable front that pretty well seals the
heating chamber from the room in the front at least. There are 2
separate wall controls to turn off/on the fireplace burner and the
fireplace blower fan.

It is seven years old, and worked fine when I last used it two years
ago. The current cold snap has caused me to want to use it again.
I can't get it work right.

What happens is this. I ignite the pilot manually the usual way
(turning the knob to pilot and while holding the knob in, pressing the
igniter button which clicks a spark). I then turn the know to burner
position, and turn the burner wall switch ON. After a slight delay
the main burner comes on and will stay on. Now the bad part. If I
close the front plate glass, the burner will not stay on - going out
and taking the pilot with it. If I don't put the glass on, the burner
will stay on, presumably forever. The blower fan seems to work fine
off the wall switch - so I don't think that is a factor.

It is almost as if, the burner goes out from lack of air. So that
raises a question. If I can't get any help as to what is wrong with
my fireplace, I at least would like to understand where the air comes
from to support the burner flames? I simply do not see any
passageway(s). I have read and printed every web documentation on
this fireplace, and no mention is made of where that air would come
from.

Thinking that is my problem, I am looking to find out why air is not
getting to my burners.

Anyone?

Thanks

Jethro

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  #2  
Old February 8th 07, 09:58 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 18
Default HEATILATOR GNDC36 Fireplace - Need Help


"Jethro" wrote in message
news
I have a HEATILATOR GNDC36 Fireplace running on propane.
I will try to describe it.
It has a vertical stack to the roof ending with a terminator cap.
It is a direct vent model, using room air, and has a standing pilot
ignition. The gas control has the usual thermocouple and thermopile
arrangement. The direct venting consists of a built-in fan that draws
room air at the bottom, blowing the air upward behind the heating
chamber and back out the top into the room, thus giving warm air.
It has a plate glass removable front that pretty well seals the
heating chamber from the room in the front at least. There are 2
separate wall controls to turn off/on the fireplace burner and the
fireplace blower fan.

It is seven years old, and worked fine when I last used it two years
ago. The current cold snap has caused me to want to use it again.
I can't get it work right.

What happens is this. I ignite the pilot manually the usual way
(turning the knob to pilot and while holding the knob in, pressing the
igniter button which clicks a spark). I then turn the know to burner
position, and turn the burner wall switch ON. After a slight delay
the main burner comes on and will stay on. Now the bad part. If I
close the front plate glass, the burner will not stay on - going out
and taking the pilot with it. If I don't put the glass on, the burner
will stay on, presumably forever. The blower fan seems to work fine
off the wall switch - so I don't think that is a factor.

It is almost as if, the burner goes out from lack of air. So that
raises a question. If I can't get any help as to what is wrong with
my fireplace, I at least would like to understand where the air comes
from to support the burner flames? I simply do not see any
passageway(s). I have read and printed every web documentation on
this fireplace, and no mention is made of where that air would come
from.

Thinking that is my problem, I am looking to find out why air is not
getting to my burners.

Anyone?

Thanks

Jethro
Try cleaning the pilot light It should be a blue flame with very little
yellow.



  #3  
Old February 8th 07, 10:09 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 86
Default HEATILATOR GNDC36 Fireplace - Need Help

On Thu, 08 Feb 2007 21:58:19 GMT, "Gary" wrote:


"Jethro" wrote in message
news
I have a HEATILATOR GNDC36 Fireplace running on propane.
I will try to describe it.
It has a vertical stack to the roof ending with a terminator cap.
It is a direct vent model, using room air, and has a standing pilot
ignition. The gas control has the usual thermocouple and thermopile
arrangement. The direct venting consists of a built-in fan that draws
room air at the bottom, blowing the air upward behind the heating
chamber and back out the top into the room, thus giving warm air.
It has a plate glass removable front that pretty well seals the
heating chamber from the room in the front at least. There are 2
separate wall controls to turn off/on the fireplace burner and the
fireplace blower fan.

It is seven years old, and worked fine when I last used it two years
ago. The current cold snap has caused me to want to use it again.
I can't get it work right.

What happens is this. I ignite the pilot manually the usual way
(turning the knob to pilot and while holding the knob in, pressing the
igniter button which clicks a spark). I then turn the know to burner
position, and turn the burner wall switch ON. After a slight delay
the main burner comes on and will stay on. Now the bad part. If I
close the front plate glass, the burner will not stay on - going out
and taking the pilot with it. If I don't put the glass on, the burner
will stay on, presumably forever. The blower fan seems to work fine
off the wall switch - so I don't think that is a factor.

It is almost as if, the burner goes out from lack of air. So that
raises a question. If I can't get any help as to what is wrong with
my fireplace, I at least would like to understand where the air comes
from to support the burner flames? I simply do not see any
passageway(s). I have read and printed every web documentation on
this fireplace, and no mention is made of where that air would come
from.

Thinking that is my problem, I am looking to find out why air is not
getting to my burners.

Anyone?

Thanks

Jethro
Try cleaning the pilot light It should be a blue flame with very little
yellow.


Thanks for response Gary.

Since my post, I bit the bullet and removed the imitation logs so I
could better view the burner + pilot. Lo - I found the source of air
that worried me so much. Turns out there are two elliptical holes
under where the logs were through which the needed air would be
supplied. That answered anyway. I have also vacuumed the insides
including the pilot assembly. Also, as I watch the exposed burners
now, I see that the pilot flame seems to deteriorate badly when I
close the glass front panel. I think the down draft from the stack at
the top is the source of that. I don't know what to do about that,
but maybe I can move or raise the thermo duo so as to be more
enveloped by the pilot flame. I have found no way to increase the
pilot flame though. That surprises me. If there is an adjustment
knob for the pilot flame, I sure don't see it.

At least, can you tell me how should I clean the thermocouple and
thermopile? Maybe you have an idea about the pilot flame? Or moving
the thermo pair?

Thanks again

Jethro
  #4  
Old February 9th 07, 12:30 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 86
Default HEATILATOR GNDC36 Fireplace - Need Help

On Thu, 08 Feb 2007 22:09:38 GMT, Jethro wrote:

On Thu, 08 Feb 2007 21:58:19 GMT, "Gary" wrote:


"Jethro" wrote in message
news
I have a HEATILATOR GNDC36 Fireplace running on propane.
I will try to describe it.
It has a vertical stack to the roof ending with a terminator cap.
It is a direct vent model, using room air, and has a standing pilot
ignition. The gas control has the usual thermocouple and thermopile
arrangement. The direct venting consists of a built-in fan that draws
room air at the bottom, blowing the air upward behind the heating
chamber and back out the top into the room, thus giving warm air.
It has a plate glass removable front that pretty well seals the
heating chamber from the room in the front at least. There are 2
separate wall controls to turn off/on the fireplace burner and the
fireplace blower fan.

It is seven years old, and worked fine when I last used it two years
ago. The current cold snap has caused me to want to use it again.
I can't get it work right.

What happens is this. I ignite the pilot manually the usual way
(turning the knob to pilot and while holding the knob in, pressing the
igniter button which clicks a spark). I then turn the know to burner
position, and turn the burner wall switch ON. After a slight delay
the main burner comes on and will stay on. Now the bad part. If I
close the front plate glass, the burner will not stay on - going out
and taking the pilot with it. If I don't put the glass on, the burner
will stay on, presumably forever. The blower fan seems to work fine
off the wall switch - so I don't think that is a factor.

It is almost as if, the burner goes out from lack of air. So that
raises a question. If I can't get any help as to what is wrong with
my fireplace, I at least would like to understand where the air comes
from to support the burner flames? I simply do not see any
passageway(s). I have read and printed every web documentation on
this fireplace, and no mention is made of where that air would come
from.

Thinking that is my problem, I am looking to find out why air is not
getting to my burners.

Anyone?

Thanks

Jethro
Try cleaning the pilot light It should be a blue flame with very little
yellow.


Thanks for response Gary.

Since my post, I bit the bullet and removed the imitation logs so I
could better view the burner + pilot. Lo - I found the source of air
that worried me so much. Turns out there are two elliptical holes
under where the logs were through which the needed air would be
supplied. That answered anyway. I have also vacuumed the insides
including the pilot assembly. Also, as I watch the exposed burners
now, I see that the pilot flame seems to deteriorate badly when I
close the glass front panel. I think the down draft from the stack at
the top is the source of that. I don't know what to do about that,
but maybe I can move or raise the thermo duo so as to be more
enveloped by the pilot flame. I have found no way to increase the
pilot flame though. That surprises me. If there is an adjustment
knob for the pilot flame, I sure don't see it.

At least, can you tell me how should I clean the thermocouple and
thermopile? Maybe you have an idea about the pilot flame? Or moving
the thermo pair?

Thanks again

Jethro


I still am wondering how to 'clean' the thermocouple and thermopile.
Also, I am thinking now that my pilot assemble is missing something
called a 'pilot hood'. The diagram shows one, which I do not have.
Perhaps if I had one, it would deflect the pilot flame more downward
to better envelop the two electrodes. But, alas, as yet I cannot find
a source to buy such a thing. Maybe I could make one?

Thanks

Jethro
  #5  
Old February 10th 07, 02:25 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1
Default HEATILATOR GNDC36 Fireplace - Need Help

Have you checked the venting to your direct vent fireplace? Since you
hadn't used it in a couple years, the vent and/or vent cap may be
blocked by debris, bird nests, etc., which would definitely cause an
oxygen problem and the fireplace going out when the glass is installed.

  #6  
Old February 10th 07, 10:53 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 86
Default HEATILATOR GNDC36 Fireplace - Need Help

On 9 Feb 2007 18:25:53 -0800, "
wrote:

Have you checked the venting to your direct vent fireplace? Since you
hadn't used it in a couple years, the vent and/or vent cap may be
blocked by debris, bird nests, etc., which would definitely cause an
oxygen problem and the fireplace going out when the glass is installed.



No - and I thought of that. But is so cold and would require a trip
up the roof to remove the terminal cap so I can look down the stack
that this old man doesn't feel up to it. I certainly will have
someone do that in the Spring.

Thanks

Jethro
  #7  
Old February 10th 07, 02:45 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 86
Default HEATILATOR GNDC36 Fireplace - Need Help

On 9 Feb 2007 18:25:53 -0800, "
wrote:

Have you checked the venting to your direct vent fireplace? Since you
hadn't used it in a couple years, the vent and/or vent cap may be
blocked by debris, bird nests, etc., which would definitely cause an
oxygen problem and the fireplace going out when the glass is installed.



This is where I stand now.

I removed the imitation logs so I could watch the gas pilot and burner
more closely. It looked to me as if the pilot flames were being drawn
away by maybe a draft from the flue from the thermocouple &
thermopile, and by so doing caused the thermos to cool to the point
that the burner & pilot were shut off. This would seem to be a
reasonable 'cause & effect'. At least to me.

I placed a small piece of aluminum foil so as to shield the pilot
flame going to the thermocouple to in effect block this so-called
draft a little. It did the job nicely. All day yesterday, the
fireplace burned without a hitch. Turned it off - went to bed.

This AM, I fired it up, and again, the burner would not stay on, like
before. On the theory that the draft was involved, I opened the glass
panel on the front and lit the burner. It stayed lit, like it always
did, as long as I kept the glass open. Again, on the theory that
draft is involved, I let it burn for a few minutes to in effect heat
the flue - and then closed the glass. That was hours ago, and it is
still burning fine.

So, I wonder why this is happening now - whereas it never happen a few
years ago when I was last using the fireplace. Maybe the flue is
blocked a little by something. If it ever gets warm again, I or
someone younger (of which there are many) should get up on the roof
and open up the terminal cap for a look-see.

Thanks for your interest

Jethro
 




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