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Collapsed Sewer Lines



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 4th 07, 09:26 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1
Default Collapsed Sewer Lines

I need help here guys and gals...

I've had at least 3 plumbers and the Water Works to make an "eyeball"
diagnosis that my sewer line has collapsed or has tree roots going
into it which is causing sewage overflow in the bottom level bathroom
of my split level home. My house is situated on a hill which makes
the sewer line approximately 78 ft. to the road and approximately 8 ft
deep at the drain by the road. A couple of plumbers have told me that
all the pipes in my neighborhood are made of the paper/tar pipes and
eventually collapse and are prone to root growth. Additionally, I
have no cleanout valve. Problem is, I've had several opinions of what
needs to be done - dig up entire line @ $3300 or bust into the main
line and replace/repair the blockage with installation of a cleanout
valve. I'm quite frustrated at this point because even after having a
video inspection, the cause of the blockage could not be determined
(water in sewage line). I feel like I'm throwing away $$$ in an
bottomless pit with estimates and opinions and the rentals of augers/
snakes/root killers. I don't know who's telling the truth at this
point and who's looking out for my best interest in terms of $$. The
Water Works was kind enough to snake the line to the house and advised
since there was mud present, the line may have collapsed. I'm leaning
towards the diagnosis from the WW.

My question is, what should my next course of action be? Dig up the
entire line? Get another opinion from another plumber to repair
blockage? Have another inspection? What's your experience of the
cost involved? Any suggestions would be much appreciated!

Drowning in my own....

Ads
  #2  
Old February 4th 07, 09:45 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 5,834
Default Collapsed Sewer Lines


wrote in message

My question is, what should my next course of action be? Dig up the
entire line? Get another opinion from another plumber to repair
blockage? Have another inspection? What's your experience of the
cost involved? Any suggestions would be much appreciated!

Drowning in my own....


I don't think you have much choice. In reality, $3300 sounds reasonable for
the amount of work to be done. If it is collapsed, you'll end up replacing
the entire line anyway, either now or later at even higher cost. Once the
equipment is on-site, it is cheaper to just keep on digging instead of
making a second trip in a week, or month or year.


  #3  
Old February 4th 07, 09:50 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 14
Default Collapsed Sewer Lines


wrote in message
oups.com...
I need help here guys and gals...

I've had at least 3 plumbers and the Water Works to make an "eyeball"
diagnosis that my sewer line has collapsed or has tree roots going
into it which is causing sewage overflow in the bottom level bathroom
of my split level home. My house is situated on a hill which makes
the sewer line approximately 78 ft. to the road and approximately 8 ft
deep at the drain by the road. A couple of plumbers have told me that
all the pipes in my neighborhood are made of the paper/tar pipes and
eventually collapse and are prone to root growth. Additionally, I
have no cleanout valve. Problem is, I've had several opinions of what
needs to be done - dig up entire line @ $3300 or bust into the main
line and replace/repair the blockage with installation of a cleanout
valve. I'm quite frustrated at this point because even after having a
video inspection, the cause of the blockage could not be determined
(water in sewage line). I feel like I'm throwing away $$$ in an
bottomless pit with estimates and opinions and the rentals of augers/
snakes/root killers. I don't know who's telling the truth at this
point and who's looking out for my best interest in terms of $$. The
Water Works was kind enough to snake the line to the house and advised
since there was mud present, the line may have collapsed. I'm leaning
towards the diagnosis from the WW.

My question is, what should my next course of action be? Dig up the
entire line? Get another opinion from another plumber to repair
blockage? Have another inspection? What's your experience of the
cost involved? Any suggestions would be much appreciated!

Drowning in my own....

In Fairbanks, Alaska the city was involved in a major law suit over the same
kind of problem. I would find out the manufacturer of the sewer pipe and
find if there has been a legal settlement over the problem. In the mean
time I would rent a Kubota backhoe B21 and dig the line up for myself. It
takes about two hours to become proficient at using the backhoe and it will
save you a ton of money (unless someone else is going to pay.) The backhoe
uses two hand operated joy stick type levers to operate and is kind of like
a reality video game. If you can't do it get your kids to do it. They love
running these things. I believe the B21 digs to 9 feet. I own a BX24 that
digs to six feet. But you can use the front loader to dig an access lane to
allow deeper cuts. You can dig your trench in about 1 to 3 days.


  #4  
Old February 4th 07, 09:53 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 747
Default Collapsed Sewer Lines

wrote:
I need help here guys and gals...

I've had at least 3 plumbers and the Water Works to make an "eyeball"
diagnosis that my sewer line has collapsed or has tree roots going
into it which is causing sewage overflow in the bottom level bathroom
of my split level home. My house is situated on a hill which makes
the sewer line approximately 78 ft. to the road and approximately 8 ft
deep at the drain by the road. A couple of plumbers have told me that
all the pipes in my neighborhood are made of the paper/tar pipes and
eventually collapse and are prone to root growth.



For the history:
http://www.sewerhistory.org/grfx/com...pipe-orng1.htm

One town's story:
http://www.whotv.com/Global/story.asp?S=2599369

Have neighbors had this work done? Get recommendations?

The price you were given for replacement doesn't sound bad,
but of course you'll want to get a few more quotes *in writing*.
The bid should stipulate that the contractor is licensed and that
he will be responsible for getting permits, etc.

What about damages the excavating causes? Spell that out.
How long will you be without any sewer?? Spell that out.

Often, the house water line was placed in the same trench
with the sewer. Spell out who will pay for a new water line
if damaged or if the line is found to be defective in some way.
How long could you be without water? And would the same
contractor handle replacement or would you be at the mercy
of someone else in what would be an emergency?

Get proof of contractor liability and workers comp coverage.

There are many surprises that contractors can have in store for
the unwary.
--------------
Can the sewer be simply "re-lined"? Ask around, but collapsed
Orangeburg may not support re-lining and could be just as
expensive.

Jim
  #5  
Old February 4th 07, 10:32 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 6,205
Default Collapsed Sewer Lines

If the line is still passing a little water try my favorite root
killer, its cheap, non hazardous and highly effective. my line is
terracota with a joint every 3 feet, every joint but one had tree
roots in it.

Ever notice how rocksalt kills grass around sidewalks?

Dump a 25 pound bag in a wash tub mix hot water to help it dissolve
and try and get most of it down line, then go out for day so the salt
stays in contact with the roots kiiling them

been doing this for 10 years now with no problems, just repeat 3 to 4
times a year, to keep the roots from regrowing.

you can use rock or softener salt, it can do no harm and may just save
you the cost of a new line

my 80 foot line estimate was about 8 grand I can buy salt forever to
save that much $

the water in your line may be a sagged or low spot, not necessarily
collapse.

they can also clean and install a vinyl liner and avoid nearly all the
digging, pricey but saves execavating.

but please try the salt and let us know what happens

  #6  
Old February 5th 07, 12:31 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 233
Default Collapsed Sewer Lines

On Feb 4, 2:26 pm, wrote:
I need help here guys and gals...

I've had at least 3 plumbers and the Water Works to make an "eyeball"
diagnosis that my sewer line has collapsed or has tree roots going
into it which is causing sewage overflow in the bottom level bathroom
of my split level home. My house is situated on a hill which makes
the sewer line approximately 78 ft. to the road and approximately 8 ft
deep at the drain by the road. A couple of plumbers have told me that
all the pipes in my neighborhood are made of the paper/tar pipes and
eventually collapse and are prone to root growth. Additionally, I
have no cleanout valve. Problem is, I've had several opinions of what
needs to be done - dig up entire line @ $3300 or bust into the main
line and replace/repair the blockage with installation of a cleanout
valve. I'm quite frustrated at this point because even after having a
video inspection, the cause of the blockage could not be determined
(water in sewage line). I feel like I'm throwing away $$$ in an
bottomless pit with estimates and opinions and the rentals of augers/
snakes/root killers. I don't know who's telling the truth at this
point and who's looking out for my best interest in terms of $$. The
Water Works was kind enough to snake the line to the house and advised
since there was mud present, the line may have collapsed. I'm leaning
towards the diagnosis from the WW.

My question is, what should my next course of action be? Dig up the
entire line? Get another opinion from another plumber to repair
blockage? Have another inspection? What's your experience of the
cost involved? Any suggestions would be much appreciated!

Drowning in my own....


If the line is starting to collapse , you might as well get it all
done now , rather than have a series of problems.

You may save some money by digging the trench yourself , or hiring an
excavator to do it.

Find out before you start if the water line is in the same trench

  #7  
Old February 5th 07, 01:17 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 68
Default Collapsed Sewer Lines


wrote in message
oups.com...
I need help here guys and gals...

I've had at least 3 plumbers and the Water Works to make an "eyeball"
diagnosis that my sewer line has collapsed or has tree roots going
into it which is causing sewage overflow in the bottom level bathroom
of my split level home. My house is situated on a hill which makes
the sewer line approximately 78 ft. to the road and approximately 8 ft
deep at the drain by the road. A couple of plumbers have told me that
all the pipes in my neighborhood are made of the paper/tar pipes and
eventually collapse and are prone to root growth. Additionally, I
have no cleanout valve. Problem is, I've had several opinions of what
needs to be done - dig up entire line @ $3300 or bust into the main
line and replace/repair the blockage with installation of a cleanout
valve. I'm quite frustrated at this point because even after having a
video inspection, the cause of the blockage could not be determined
(water in sewage line). I feel like I'm throwing away $$$ in an
bottomless pit with estimates and opinions and the rentals of augers/
snakes/root killers. I don't know who's telling the truth at this
point and who's looking out for my best interest in terms of $$. The
Water Works was kind enough to snake the line to the house and advised
since there was mud present, the line may have collapsed. I'm leaning
towards the diagnosis from the WW.

My question is, what should my next course of action be? Dig up the
entire line? Get another opinion from another plumber to repair
blockage? Have another inspection? What's your experience of the
cost involved? Any suggestions would be much appreciated!

Drowning in my own....


For $3000.00 you would be better off replacing the line. Piecemeal repair
is probably going to exceed that price.

Bill


  #8  
Old February 5th 07, 01:42 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,205
Default Collapsed Sewer Lines

On Feb 4, 3:26�pm, wrote:
I need help here guys and gals...

I've had at least 3 plumbers and the Water Works to make an "eyeball"
diagnosis that my sewer line has collapsed or has tree roots going
into it which is causing sewage overflow in the bottom level bathroom
of my split level home. *My house is situated on a hill which makes
the sewer line approximately 78 ft. to the road and approximately 8 ft
deep at the drain by the road. *A couple of plumbers have told me that
all the pipes in my neighborhood are made of the paper/tar pipes and
eventually collapse and are prone to root growth. *Additionally, I
have no cleanout valve. *Problem is, I've had several opinions of what
needs to be done *- dig up entire line @ $3300 or bust into the main
line and replace/repair the blockage with installation of a cleanout
valve. *I'm quite frustrated at this point because even after having a
video inspection, the cause of the blockage could not be determined
(water in sewage line). *I feel like I'm throwing away $$$ in an
bottomless pit with estimates and opinions and the rentals of augers/
snakes/root killers. *I don't know who's telling the truth at this
point and who's looking *out for my best interest in terms of $$. *The
Water Works was kind enough to snake the line to the house and advised
since there was mud present, the line may have collapsed. *I'm leaning
towards the diagnosis from the WW.

My question is, what should my next course of action be? *Dig up the
entire line? *Get another opinion from another plumber to repair
blockage? *Have another inspection? *What's your experience of the
cost involved? *Any suggestions would be much appreciated!

Drowning in my own....


First its hard to tell well crap from mud

water laying in line with roots is common, lines sag low spots over
time

before spending thousands try dissolving a 25 or 50 pound bag of rock
salt and see if it helps...

it cant hurt is maybe 6 bucks and you may be successful like I am.

If it doesnt help our out 6 dollars a measley amount

rovck salt is my friend its worked great for 10 years and yeah 2
plumbers had snaked the line and said it must be replaced, about 10
years ago.


 




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