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masonry courtyard wall - how to build a 45 degree corner



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 30th 06, 04:18 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 4
Default masonry courtyard wall - how to build a 45 degree corner

Hi,

I plan on building a 3 or 4 ft courtyard wall. I would like to use
lightweight concrete block, dry stacked, and covered in a fiberglass
reinforced stucco (e.g. QuickWall). The wall is not load bearing. My
designed calls for some 45 degree corners. Is there a standard method
to get the 45 degree corner with standard 8 x 8 x 16 cement blocks
(CMUs)? The QuickWall manufacturer recommends a tight running bond
pattern for the dry stacked block. Thx.

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  #3  
Old December 30th 06, 02:16 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 161
Default masonry courtyard wall - how to build a 45 degree corner


There are block companies that make 45* corners. The more usual
method would be to miter the corners with a saw. You will need
1/2 blocks to make running bond and/or custom cut blocks to
complete the work anyway. It would be an unusual circumstance to
have everything come out in full block units.

I would slush and rebar the corners and 4' o.c. with the
quickwall. How tall are you planning to go?

You might be able to take the necessary blocks to a working job
site where they are laying block. A six pack or case and a $20
bill can accomplish wonders, especially when you can ask to have
them done over the next day or two.
___________________________
Keep the whole world singing. . . .
DanG


wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi,

I plan on building a 3 or 4 ft courtyard wall. I would like to
use
lightweight concrete block, dry stacked, and covered in a
fiberglass
reinforced stucco (e.g. QuickWall). The wall is not load
bearing. My
designed calls for some 45 degree corners. Is there a standard
method
to get the 45 degree corner with standard 8 x 8 x 16 cement
blocks
(CMUs)? The QuickWall manufacturer recommends a tight running
bond
pattern for the dry stacked block. Thx.



  #4  
Old December 30th 06, 09:49 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default masonry courtyard wall - how to build a 45 degree corner

Thanks for the reply. The wall will only be 3 or 4 ft high. I like the
idea of the 45 degree corner block, though it doesn't seem to be
readily available where I'm at (Northern California). The problem with
mitering the corner blocks is that other than being a PITA I would have
a seam at each corner, and not a running bond pattern. I imagine if I
slush and rebar the corner, it wouldn't really matter. I had planned to
slush, rebar, and tie into the foundation rebar every few ft anyway.

Living in the land of slab foundations, I can't remember the last time
I saw a job site with a lot of block work. Thanks again!


DanG wrote:
There are block companies that make 45* corners. The more usual
method would be to miter the corners with a saw. You will need
1/2 blocks to make running bond and/or custom cut blocks to
complete the work anyway. It would be an unusual circumstance to
have everything come out in full block units.

I would slush and rebar the corners and 4' o.c. with the
quickwall. How tall are you planning to go?

You might be able to take the necessary blocks to a working job
site where they are laying block. A six pack or case and a $20
bill can accomplish wonders, especially when you can ask to have
them done over the next day or two.
___________________________
Keep the whole world singing. . . .
DanG


wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi,

I plan on building a 3 or 4 ft courtyard wall. I would like to
use
lightweight concrete block, dry stacked, and covered in a
fiberglass
reinforced stucco (e.g. QuickWall). The wall is not load
bearing. My
designed calls for some 45 degree corners. Is there a standard
method
to get the 45 degree corner with standard 8 x 8 x 16 cement
blocks
(CMUs)? The QuickWall manufacturer recommends a tight running
bond
pattern for the dry stacked block. Thx.


  #6  
Old December 31st 06, 01:33 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 161
Default masonry courtyard wall - how to build a 45 degree corner

I believe we are all thinking about a block manufacturer, not a
Borg type store. Almost all housing in central Florida is block
and slab-on-grade. Even if your local housing is not block, I
know that any commercial work will probably have block.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DanG
A live singing Valentine,
the most romantic thing you can do with your clothes on
(local)
http://www.singingvalentines.com/ (national)


wrote in message
ups.com...
Thanks for the reply. The wall will only be 3 or 4 ft high. I
like the
idea of the 45 degree corner block, though it doesn't seem to be
readily available where I'm at (Northern California). The
problem with
mitering the corner blocks is that other than being a PITA I
would have
a seam at each corner, and not a running bond pattern. I imagine
if I
slush and rebar the corner, it wouldn't really matter. I had
planned to
slush, rebar, and tie into the foundation rebar every few ft
anyway.

Living in the land of slab foundations, I can't remember the
last time
I saw a job site with a lot of block work. Thanks again!


DanG wrote:
There are block companies that make 45* corners. The more
usual
method would be to miter the corners with a saw. You will need
1/2 blocks to make running bond and/or custom cut blocks to
complete the work anyway. It would be an unusual circumstance
to
have everything come out in full block units.

I would slush and rebar the corners and 4' o.c. with the
quickwall. How tall are you planning to go?

You might be able to take the necessary blocks to a working job
site where they are laying block. A six pack or case and a $20
bill can accomplish wonders, especially when you can ask to
have
them done over the next day or two.
___________________________
Keep the whole world singing. . . .
DanG


wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi,

I plan on building a 3 or 4 ft courtyard wall. I would like
to
use
lightweight concrete block, dry stacked, and covered in a
fiberglass
reinforced stucco (e.g. QuickWall). The wall is not load
bearing. My
designed calls for some 45 degree corners. Is there a
standard
method
to get the 45 degree corner with standard 8 x 8 x 16 cement
blocks
(CMUs)? The QuickWall manufacturer recommends a tight running
bond
pattern for the dry stacked block. Thx.




  #7  
Old December 31st 06, 07:23 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 141
Default masonry courtyard wall - how to build a 45 degree corner

Being the lazy man that I am I would form up and pour the corner if no
45 blocks were to be had, cutting wood is still easier than cutting
concrete.

  #8  
Old January 1st 07, 08:20 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default masonry courtyard wall - how to build a 45 degree corner

Thanks to everyone for the info. It sounds like the best course is to
check around for the 45 degree corner block. Before my initial post, I
had called one landscape supply yard and asked about the 45 degree
block. He said that not only didn't he have it, but no one does. This
lead me to believe I was thinking about the problem wrong. Now it
sounds like I was just talking with the wrong person and the wrong
outfit....


DanG wrote:
I believe we are all thinking about a block manufacturer, not a
Borg type store. Almost all housing in central Florida is block
and slab-on-grade. Even if your local housing is not block, I
know that any commercial work will probably have block.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DanG
A live singing Valentine,
the most romantic thing you can do with your clothes on
(local)
http://www.singingvalentines.com/ (national)


wrote in message
ups.com...
Thanks for the reply. The wall will only be 3 or 4 ft high. I
like the
idea of the 45 degree corner block, though it doesn't seem to be
readily available where I'm at (Northern California). The
problem with
mitering the corner blocks is that other than being a PITA I
would have
a seam at each corner, and not a running bond pattern. I imagine
if I
slush and rebar the corner, it wouldn't really matter. I had
planned to
slush, rebar, and tie into the foundation rebar every few ft
anyway.

Living in the land of slab foundations, I can't remember the
last time
I saw a job site with a lot of block work. Thanks again!


DanG wrote:
There are block companies that make 45* corners. The more
usual
method would be to miter the corners with a saw. You will need
1/2 blocks to make running bond and/or custom cut blocks to
complete the work anyway. It would be an unusual circumstance
to
have everything come out in full block units.

I would slush and rebar the corners and 4' o.c. with the
quickwall. How tall are you planning to go?

You might be able to take the necessary blocks to a working job
site where they are laying block. A six pack or case and a $20
bill can accomplish wonders, especially when you can ask to
have
them done over the next day or two.
___________________________
Keep the whole world singing. . . .
DanG


wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi,

I plan on building a 3 or 4 ft courtyard wall. I would like
to
use
lightweight concrete block, dry stacked, and covered in a
fiberglass
reinforced stucco (e.g. QuickWall). The wall is not load
bearing. My
designed calls for some 45 degree corners. Is there a
standard
method
to get the 45 degree corner with standard 8 x 8 x 16 cement
blocks
(CMUs)? The QuickWall manufacturer recommends a tight running
bond
pattern for the dry stacked block. Thx.



 




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