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Leakproofing Spa thermostat entrance



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 5th 06, 07:25 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 3
Default Leakproofing Spa thermostat entrance

I have a very old spa that likes to give me headaches.

It has a hole for inserting the thermostat's bulb, which unfortunately
is very close to some other object insidethe control unit, so I can
insert the bulb, but just barely.

The hole is in a PVC fitting with threads on the outer side and hole
on the inside where I put the bulb through.

Anyway, my question is, what is a good way to prevent leaks in that
area where the bulb enters the hole. Plumbers putty does not seem to
work well in the long run.

thanks

i
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  #2  
Old October 5th 06, 07:37 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 3
Default Leakproofing Spa thermostat entrance

Scratch my question. I realized that what I need is called a
"thermowell". I will install just that.

i

On Thu, 5 Oct 2006 17:25:45 +0000 (UTC), Ignoramus4299 wrote:
I have a very old spa that likes to give me headaches.

It has a hole for inserting the thermostat's bulb, which unfortunately
is very close to some other object insidethe control unit, so I can
insert the bulb, but just barely.

The hole is in a PVC fitting with threads on the outer side and hole
on the inside where I put the bulb through.

Anyway, my question is, what is a good way to prevent leaks in that
area where the bulb enters the hole. Plumbers putty does not seem to
work well in the long run.

thanks

i

  #3  
Old October 6th 06, 01:31 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 174
Default Leakproofing Spa thermostat entrance

"Ignoramus4299" wrote in message
...
I have a very old spa that likes to give me headaches.

It has a hole for inserting the thermostat's bulb, which unfortunately
is very close to some other object insidethe control unit, so I can
insert the bulb, but just barely.

The hole is in a PVC fitting with threads on the outer side and hole
on the inside where I put the bulb through.

Anyway, my question is, what is a good way to prevent leaks in that
area where the bulb enters the hole. Plumbers putty does not seem to
work well in the long run.


If your spa is in good condition and you're happy with the size, # of jets,
etc. it might be a good investment to upgrade it with a new "Spa Kit".
Basically these include a new pump, heater, and electronic controls that
will be MUCH nicer than your old-fashioned controls and air-bulb triggers...

Cost is something like $400-$500 if you do it yourself...

-Tim


  #4  
Old October 6th 06, 05:32 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 4
Default Leakproofing Spa thermostat entrance

On Thu, 5 Oct 2006 18:31:48 -0500, Tim Fischer wrote:
"Ignoramus4299" wrote in message
...
I have a very old spa that likes to give me headaches.

It has a hole for inserting the thermostat's bulb, which unfortunately
is very close to some other object insidethe control unit, so I can
insert the bulb, but just barely.

The hole is in a PVC fitting with threads on the outer side and hole
on the inside where I put the bulb through.

Anyway, my question is, what is a good way to prevent leaks in that
area where the bulb enters the hole. Plumbers putty does not seem to
work well in the long run.


If your spa is in good condition and you're happy with the size, # of jets,
etc. it might be a good investment to upgrade it with a new "Spa Kit".
Basically these include a new pump, heater, and electronic controls that
will be MUCH nicer than your old-fashioned controls and air-bulb triggers...

Cost is something like $400-$500 if you do it yourself...


You have a good point, but what I have, basically works okay and just
needs a couple of upgrades (timer and that thermowell). If the old
control goes bad, or the pump breaks, I will definitely consider
buying a new spa pack as you say. There is limited space and poor
access to the spa front, so I prefer not to go this route (full
upgrade) if possible. It means at least a week wasted on evening work.

i
 




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