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How to clean aluminum baking pans used for roasting. Black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove residues.



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 15th 06, 08:08 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default How to clean aluminum baking pans used for roasting. Black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove residues.

How do you clean an aluminum baking pan that was used for roasting?...
there are baked on black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove
residues

How would that home cleaning remedies guy on public television, Graham
Haley, clean it with some compound of various proportions of vinegar,
baking soda, baking powder, cream of tartar or other substances?...
especially without need for any elbow grease!

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  #2  
Old September 15th 06, 08:24 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 2
Default How to clean aluminum baking pans used for roasting. Scorched food residues. Black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove residues.

Scorched food residues. Aluminum baking pans used for roasting.

How do you clean an aluminum baking pan that was used for roasting?...
there are baked on black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove
residues.

How would that home cleaning remedies guy on public television, Graham
Haley, clean it with some compound of various proportions of vinegar,
baking soda, baking powder, cream of tartar or other substances?...
especially without need for any elbow grease!

  #3  
Old September 15th 06, 09:14 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 44
Default How to clean aluminum baking pans used for roasting. Scorched food residues. Black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove residues.

there is a product used in the restaurant business called "sok off"
which does as you ask and truely without elbow grease.



wrote:
Scorched food residues. Aluminum baking pans used for roasting.

How do you clean an aluminum baking pan that was used for roasting?...
there are baked on black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove
residues.

How would that home cleaning remedies guy on public television, Graham
Haley, clean it with some compound of various proportions of vinegar,
baking soda, baking powder, cream of tartar or other substances?...
especially without need for any elbow grease!


  #5  
Old September 15th 06, 02:17 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 4,770
Default How to clean aluminum baking pans used for roasting. Scorched food residues. Black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove residues.

Italian Mason wrote:
there is a product used in the restaurant business called "sok off"
which does as you ask and truely without elbow grease.


If the stuff works that well I'm definitely buying some. I Googled
"sok off" and came up with only a couple of hits. There's "Soak Off"
which also only returned a few hits. Where do you get yours?

R

  #7  
Old September 15th 06, 03:36 PM posted to alt.home.repair
Sev
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Posts: 160
Default How to clean aluminum baking pans used for roasting. Scorched food residues. Black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove residues.


There is a product called aluminum foil which obviates the need for all
that elbow grease, etc. Don't generally like to advocate waste, but
here it's the foil(which is recyclable in some jurisdictions) vs. the
hot water and detergent. BTW when I have a large pan, but only regular
foil at hand, I combine two pieces with a tightly double- folded seam
like a metal roof seam, running something hard along it to seal.
Hardly ever leaks.

  #8  
Old September 15th 06, 03:37 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 42
Default How to clean aluminum baking pans used for roasting. Black, dark brown, light brown difficult to removeresidues.

It's bound to happen... if anyone suggests oven cleaner, do not do it.
If you want some amusement value, go outside, take some oven cleaner
and spray it on a sheet of AL foil, quickly ball it up, and leave it
on a non flammable surface until the exothermic reaction starts it
smoking.

I've had some badly scorched sheets. A couple times i scrubbed them
with a stainless steel scrubby (love them!)... I've also "seasoned" a
few by coating with light oil and baking till black... like you would
cast iron. The problem with cookie sheets and scrubbing is that you
will micro scratch the sheet, which will likely make it a little more
prone to sticking.


good luck! (and learn to use parchement paper or foil on your sheets!

--
May no harm befall you,
flip
Ich habe keine Ahnung was das bedeutet, oder vielleicht doch?

  #9  
Old September 16th 06, 04:05 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 3,110
Default How to clean aluminum baking pans used for roasting. Black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove residues.

Goedjn wrote in
:

On 15 Sep 2006 00:08:47 -0700, wrote:

How do you clean an aluminum baking pan that was used for roasting?...
there are baked on black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove
residues

How would that home cleaning remedies guy on public television, Graham
Haley, clean it with some compound of various proportions of vinegar,
baking soda, baking powder, cream of tartar or other substances?...
especially without need for any elbow grease!



Heat it up until it glows, and dump water into it?
Use this stuff?
http://www.robotcoupe.net/Qstore/p000759.htm

Throw the crap away and buy decent cookware?




Automatic dishwasher detergent is a really strong cleaner.
Heat up enough water to fill a container large enough to hold the item you
want cleaned,then dissolve some automatic dishwasher(gel dissolves best)
detergent into it and pour into the container (or put hot water into the
container and mix in the detergent)then immerse the item.
Let it soak until the stuff is eaten away.It helps if the solution is kept
hot,and for really tough deposits,you may have to replace with a fresh
batch of solution.

The problem is then finding a sufficiently large container for your item.
;-)


--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
at
kua.net
 




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