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How to clean aluminum baking pans used for roasting. Black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove residues.



 
 
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  #11  
Old September 20th 06, 05:37 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 265
Default How to clean aluminum baking pans used for roasting. Scorched food residues. Black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove residues.

On Fri, 15 Sep 2006 11:21:30 GMT, Norminn wrote:

wrote:
:
: Scorched food residues. Aluminum baking pans used for roasting.
:
: How do you clean an aluminum baking pan that was used for roasting?...
: there are baked on black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove
: residues.
:
: How would that home cleaning remedies guy on public television, Graham
: Haley, clean it with some compound of various proportions of vinegar,
: baking soda, baking powder, cream of tartar or other substances?...
: especially without need for any elbow grease!
:
:3M pad, full strength Dawn, elbow grease. Be a fanatic about cookie
:sheets, which should be bright and shiny. Roasters can be dark and it
:doesn't matter. Or pitch the old one, buy a new stainless one.

For cookies I use a teflon coated pan. I don't bake cookies on my
aluminum cookie sheet anymore. I use it for other oven tasks, not
cookies. Stainless, it seems to me, would have problems of its own.
Teflon cleans so readily, it's really just the thing for cookies. Cleans
in a snap. Must use plastic utensils and scrubbers, however!

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  #12  
Old September 20th 06, 09:07 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 4
Default How to clean aluminum baking pans used for roasting. Scorched food residues. Black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove residues.


"Dan_Musicant" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 15 Sep 2006 11:21:30 GMT, Norminn wrote:

wrote:
:
: Scorched food residues. Aluminum baking pans used for roasting.
:
: How do you clean an aluminum baking pan that was used for roasting?...
: there are baked on black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove
: residues.
:
: How would that home cleaning remedies guy on public television, Graham
: Haley, clean it with some compound of various proportions of vinegar,
: baking soda, baking powder, cream of tartar or other substances?...
: especially without need for any elbow grease!
:
:3M pad, full strength Dawn, elbow grease. Be a fanatic about cookie
:sheets, which should be bright and shiny. Roasters can be dark and it
:doesn't matter. Or pitch the old one, buy a new stainless one.

For cookies I use a teflon coated pan. I don't bake cookies on my
aluminum cookie sheet anymore. I use it for other oven tasks, not
cookies. Stainless, it seems to me, would have problems of its own.
Teflon cleans so readily, it's really just the thing for cookies. Cleans
in a snap. Must use plastic utensils and scrubbers, however!


My advice would be to either leave all the black scorched residue or throw
them away and purchase stainless or enamel based utensils.
Leaving them black would keep the surface sealed. cleaning would open the
surface and allow minute particles enter the food you cook.
It has been suggested else where that aluminium has accumulative effect on
the body/ brain and could be the result of altzimers and associated
problems. Why take the risk to save a few pennies



  #13  
Old September 20th 06, 01:56 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 2,499
Default How to clean aluminum baking pans used for roasting. Scorchedfood residues. Black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove residues.

Sev wrote:

There is a product called aluminum foil which obviates the need for all
that elbow grease, etc. Don't generally like to advocate waste, but
here it's the foil(which is recyclable in some jurisdictions) vs. the
hot water and detergent. BTW when I have a large pan, but only regular
foil at hand, I combine two pieces with a tightly double- folded seam
like a metal roof seam, running something hard along it to seal.
Hardly ever leaks.

I've heard of that stuff. The issue of dark or shiny for cooking
delicate stuff is the outside of the pan. Some recipes burn on the
bottom before the rest is done if the sheet is too dark. For roasting,
dark pan cooks faster and that might not agree with some recipes. It's
a lot harder to remove burnt on grease than it is to properly clean pans
after each use.
 




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