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Removing Hot Air from Vaulted Ceiling



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 27th 06, 05:24 PM posted to alt.home.repair,alt.hvac
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Posts: 29
Default Removing Hot Air from Vaulted Ceiling

Hi,


I have a two story house with vaulted ceilings throughout. I had AC
put in last year, but the upstairs doesn't really cool down. The front
of the house has the biggest windows, and is West Facing, so it gets
all of the afternoon sun. Last year, I also replaced all of these
windows with much more efficient windows.

However, I can't get it below 80 degrees upstairs. And this can often
be when its cooler outside.

In examining my options, I noticed that I have NO vents on my roof. I
have all vaulted ceilings, so I don't have an attic. I do have some
soffit venting on either side of the slope of my roof.

Can I put turbine vents on the roof? Will this make a difference in
temperature for those upstairs rooms if I can cool the space between
the ceiling joists and the rafters? Again I have NO ATTIC.


Really, what I'm looking for is a way of removing that hot air from the
vaulted ceilings in the summer.

Any suggestions? Turbine vents appear to be an easy solution. Will
cooling the space between the roof and the ceiling help in cooling the
room below it?


- Thanks in advance,

Todd

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  #2  
Old July 27th 06, 05:35 PM posted to alt.home.repair,alt.hvac
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Posts: 267
Default Removing Hot Air from Vaulted Ceiling


Todd wrote:
Hi,


I have a two story house with vaulted ceilings throughout. I had AC
put in last year, but the upstairs doesn't really cool down. The front
of the house has the biggest windows, and is West Facing, so it gets
all of the afternoon sun. Last year, I also replaced all of these
windows with much more efficient windows.

However, I can't get it below 80 degrees upstairs. And this can often
be when its cooler outside.

In examining my options, I noticed that I have NO vents on my roof. I
have all vaulted ceilings, so I don't have an attic. I do have some
soffit venting on either side of the slope of my roof.

Can I put turbine vents on the roof? Will this make a difference in
temperature for those upstairs rooms if I can cool the space between
the ceiling joists and the rafters? Again I have NO ATTIC.


Really, what I'm looking for is a way of removing that hot air from the
vaulted ceilings in the summer.

Any suggestions? Turbine vents appear to be an easy solution. Will
cooling the space between the roof and the ceiling help in cooling the
room below it?


- Thanks in advance,

Todd


Maybe. Soffitt venting might be useful, _if_ it's of adequate inlet
area _and_ air coming in there can move up inside the roof deck and
escape somewhere. ,

Insulation between ceiling and roof deck could block airflow, unless
spacers were installed between insulation and roof deck. You mention
nothing about this.

Ridge vent could work, and is simple, elegant solution, depending on
stuff mentioned above. Thermostatically-controlled fan(s) with
mushroom-looking enclosure would work.

Ask locally, and/or visit big-box.

J

  #3  
Old July 27th 06, 05:53 PM posted to alt.home.repair,alt.hvac
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 29
Default Removing Hot Air from Vaulted Ceiling

wrote:
Todd wrote:
Hi,


I have a two story house with vaulted ceilings throughout. I had AC
put in last year, but the upstairs doesn't really cool down. The front
of the house has the biggest windows, and is West Facing, so it gets
all of the afternoon sun. Last year, I also replaced all of these
windows with much more efficient windows.

However, I can't get it below 80 degrees upstairs. And this can often
be when its cooler outside.

In examining my options, I noticed that I have NO vents on my roof. I
have all vaulted ceilings, so I don't have an attic. I do have some
soffit venting on either side of the slope of my roof.

Can I put turbine vents on the roof? Will this make a difference in
temperature for those upstairs rooms if I can cool the space between
the ceiling joists and the rafters? Again I have NO ATTIC.


Really, what I'm looking for is a way of removing that hot air from the
vaulted ceilings in the summer.

Any suggestions? Turbine vents appear to be an easy solution. Will
cooling the space between the roof and the ceiling help in cooling the
room below it?


- Thanks in advance,

Todd


Maybe. Soffitt venting might be useful, _if_ it's of adequate inlet
area _and_ air coming in there can move up inside the roof deck and
escape somewhere. ,

Insulation between ceiling and roof deck could block airflow, unless
spacers were installed between insulation and roof deck. You mention
nothing about this.

Ridge vent could work, and is simple, elegant solution, depending on
stuff mentioned above. Thermostatically-controlled fan(s) with
mushroom-looking enclosure would work.

Ask locally, and/or visit big-box.

J


But how is it that venting the this space will help remove the heat
from the ROOM below it? This is what I don't get. I understand venting
the soffit, but I don't know how that will allow the heat in the room
below (with the vaulted ceiling) to cool down.

Any thoughts on this?

- Thanks,

Todd

  #4  
Old July 27th 06, 07:40 PM posted to alt.home.repair,alt.hvac
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Posts: 4,505
Default Removing Hot Air from Vaulted Ceiling


Todd wrote:
I don't think that my vaulted ceiling is contructed in the way that you
suggest. I think that there aren't seperate channels, but rather an
area in between the rafters and the ceiling joists. I don't think they
are conected to each other, which would, as you suggest, create
seperate channels.



Having the roof decking on one side of the rafters and the the ceiling
on the other is the simplest, cheapest and direct way of creating a
vaulted ceiling and it gives maximum height. If yours is done with
seperate rafters for the roof and ceiling joists with a space in
between, then you could ventilate that by means other than a ridge
vent, like your turbine idea. However, I still think in that case, a
ridge vent is still the way to go.

  #5  
Old July 27th 06, 07:59 PM posted to alt.home.repair,alt.hvac
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Posts: 467
Default Removing Hot Air from Vaulted Ceiling

I'm guessing that you have a n older house made before A/C or otherwise
doesn't have proper ducting for A/C. In order to get rid of the hot
air, you need a return air in an area where it's hot. If your lowest
return air grill in near the bottom of an upper floow (i.e. in the
floor itself or low on the wall) then you will need a return air placed
higher to draw in the hot air instead or recirculating the already
cooled air.

  #6  
Old July 27th 06, 08:44 PM posted to alt.home.repair,alt.hvac
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Posts: 267
Default Removing Hot Air from Vaulted Ceiling


Todd wrote:
wrote:
Todd wrote:
Hi,


I have a two story house with vaulted ceilings throughout. I had AC
put in last year, but the upstairs doesn't really cool down. The front
of the house has the biggest windows, and is West Facing, so it gets
all of the afternoon sun. Last year, I also replaced all of these
windows with much more efficient windows.

However, I can't get it below 80 degrees upstairs. And this can often
be when its cooler outside.

In examining my options, I noticed that I have NO vents on my roof. I
have all vaulted ceilings, so I don't have an attic. I do have some
soffit venting on either side of the slope of my roof.

Can I put turbine vents on the roof? Will this make a difference in
temperature for those upstairs rooms if I can cool the space between
the ceiling joists and the rafters? Again I have NO ATTIC.


Really, what I'm looking for is a way of removing that hot air from the
vaulted ceilings in the summer.

Any suggestions? Turbine vents appear to be an easy solution. Will
cooling the space between the roof and the ceiling help in cooling the
room below it?


- Thanks in advance,

Todd


Maybe. Soffitt venting might be useful, _if_ it's of adequate inlet
area _and_ air coming in there can move up inside the roof deck and
escape somewhere. ,

Insulation between ceiling and roof deck could block airflow, unless
spacers were installed between insulation and roof deck. You mention
nothing about this.

Ridge vent could work, and is simple, elegant solution, depending on
stuff mentioned above. Thermostatically-controlled fan(s) with
mushroom-looking enclosure would work.

Ask locally, and/or visit big-box.

J


But how is it that venting the this space will help remove the heat
from the ROOM below it? This is what I don't get. I understand venting
the soffit, but I don't know how that will allow the heat in the room
below (with the vaulted ceiling) to cool down.

Any thoughts on this?

- Thanks,

Todd


Hi, Todd.

How do you think the interior air (mostly) gets heated? Unless you
didn't tell us about the forge/smelter you're running in there, I'll
wager that the majority is coming from above. And you want to stop
that, by diverting it harmlessly (read: avoid roasting roof.)

Thus, if you dissipate heat from roof (see my previous about ridge
ventc, etc. too) it won't heat the innards. Infrared transmission can
move some serious energy.

You still haven't told us anything about what's between the ceiling and
the roof deck. Please investigate & report. You need to know this.

Once you control unwanted entry, then it makes sense to throw $ at
reducing the rest.

J

  #7  
Old July 27th 06, 10:28 PM posted to alt.home.repair,alt.hvac
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Posts: 29
Default Removing Hot Air from Vaulted Ceiling

The house wasn't built for A/C, it was built for heating. It does have
central heating, so added A/C wasn't a big deal since all of the duct
work was there. However,

a.) the ducts upstairs aren't as wide, to prevent TOO MUCH heat from
getting to the upstairs during the winter

b.) the return air upstaris was located at the bottom of a wall.


I put a second return air register as high as I could go right over the
existing return register, just 8 feet higher.

The problem is that the only air return occurs in the hallway, and not
in my bedrooms surrounding the hallway. And the bedrooms surrounding
the hallway have vaulted ceilings as well.

Its would be great if there was a way to get the hot air in the
bedrooms into the hallway and down the air return.

But still, i figured that venting the space between the ceiling and the
roof would better cool the room. I dunno.

- Todd




wrote:
I'm guessing that you have a n older house made before A/C or otherwise
doesn't have proper ducting for A/C. In order to get rid of the hot
air, you need a return air in an area where it's hot. If your lowest
return air grill in near the bottom of an upper floow (i.e. in the
floor itself or low on the wall) then you will need a return air placed
higher to draw in the hot air instead or recirculating the already
cooled air.


  #8  
Old July 27th 06, 10:33 PM posted to alt.home.repair,alt.hvac
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 112
Default Removing Hot Air from Vaulted Ceiling

Todd wrote:
I have a two story house with vaulted ceilings throughout. I had AC
put in last year, but the upstairs doesn't really cool down. The front
of the house has the biggest windows, and is West Facing, so it gets
all of the afternoon sun. Last year, I also replaced all of these
windows with much more efficient windows.


What did the contractor's heat gain calculation say that you needed in
BTU to cool the house, and how big a system did they put in? Is it
zoned?


  #9  
Old July 27th 06, 11:07 PM posted to alt.home.repair,alt.hvac
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,743
Default Removing Hot Air from Vaulted Ceiling

Todd wrote:
Hi,


I have a two story house with vaulted ceilings throughout. I had AC
put in last year, but the upstairs doesn't really cool down. The front
of the house has the biggest windows, and is West Facing, so it gets
all of the afternoon sun. Last year, I also replaced all of these
windows with much more efficient windows.

However, I can't get it below 80 degrees upstairs. And this can often
be when its cooler outside.

In examining my options, I noticed that I have NO vents on my roof. I
have all vaulted ceilings, so I don't have an attic. I do have some
soffit venting on either side of the slope of my roof.

Can I put turbine vents on the roof? Will this make a difference in
temperature for those upstairs rooms if I can cool the space between
the ceiling joists and the rafters? Again I have NO ATTIC.


Really, what I'm looking for is a way of removing that hot air from
the vaulted ceilings in the summer.

Any suggestions? Turbine vents appear to be an easy solution. Will
cooling the space between the roof and the ceiling help in cooling the
room below it?


- Thanks in advance,


Get a ladder.

Is the ceiling significantly hotter than the air around it? If so, the heat
in the air is coming from the ceiling.

If not, the heated air is coming from the rest of the house (heat rises).

Also, think trees.


  #10  
Old July 27th 06, 11:22 PM posted to alt.home.repair,alt.hvac
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 29
Default Removing Hot Air from Vaulted Ceiling

Thats a good thought. I will check with a ladder.

I imagine that its a combo of things - the heat rising, AND the roof
collecting heat.




HeyBub wrote:
Todd wrote:
Hi,


I have a two story house with vaulted ceilings throughout. I had AC
put in last year, but the upstairs doesn't really cool down. The front
of the house has the biggest windows, and is West Facing, so it gets
all of the afternoon sun. Last year, I also replaced all of these
windows with much more efficient windows.

However, I can't get it below 80 degrees upstairs. And this can often
be when its cooler outside.

In examining my options, I noticed that I have NO vents on my roof. I
have all vaulted ceilings, so I don't have an attic. I do have some
soffit venting on either side of the slope of my roof.

Can I put turbine vents on the roof? Will this make a difference in
temperature for those upstairs rooms if I can cool the space between
the ceiling joists and the rafters? Again I have NO ATTIC.


Really, what I'm looking for is a way of removing that hot air from
the vaulted ceilings in the summer.

Any suggestions? Turbine vents appear to be an easy solution. Will
cooling the space between the roof and the ceiling help in cooling the
room below it?


- Thanks in advance,


Get a ladder.

Is the ceiling significantly hotter than the air around it? If so, the heat
in the air is coming from the ceiling.

If not, the heated air is coming from the rest of the house (heat rises).

Also, think trees.


 




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