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Plywood decking thickness



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 26th 06, 09:30 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Plywood decking thickness

How thick should plywood decking be assuming you are using joists 16" on
center?

In my earlier years, perhaps 20 years ago, I worked for a builder who
typically used 5/8 floor decking and 1/2" on the roof and exterior walls.
Now I'm faced with an architect that insists 3/4" on the floors is a must
and 5/8" on the roof and walls is needed.

Does the floor decking depend on the finish flooring. The builder I worked
with would always install wide plank 3/4" hardwood flooring. But when I
mentioned that to the architect, he insisted that I should still use 3/4"
decking under it. His concern was regarding the holding capacity of the
nails for the hardwood flooring and that it would avoid squeaky floors
later.

Any comments?


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  #3  
Old February 26th 06, 11:21 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Plywood decking thickness

But, is it "really" 3/4??? or 23/32??? Whatever happened to the good
old days when 3/4 was really 3/4?

Anyway, I'd agree with your architect - there will be less give, it
will nail better to the joists, and it will hold the nails better for
your finished floor.

  #4  
Old February 27th 06, 12:08 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Plywood decking thickness


"Ken" wrote in message
...
How thick should plywood decking be assuming you are using joists 16" on
center?

In my earlier years, perhaps 20 years ago, I worked for a builder who
typically used 5/8 floor decking and 1/2" on the roof and exterior walls.
Now I'm faced with an architect that insists 3/4" on the floors is a must
and 5/8" on the roof and walls is needed.

Does the floor decking depend on the finish flooring. The builder I

worked
with would always install wide plank 3/4" hardwood flooring. But when I
mentioned that to the architect, he insisted that I should still use 3/4"
decking under it. His concern was regarding the holding capacity of the
nails for the hardwood flooring and that it would avoid squeaky floors
later.

Any comments?


Cant answer, the loading of the floor is unknown (pounds per square foot) ,
and the span is unknown. 3/4 T&G plywood is springy under my 280 pounds of
weight with 16 inch centers.


  #5  
Old February 27th 06, 02:06 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Plywood decking thickness

On Sun, 26 Feb 2006 16:30:22 -0500, "Ken" wrote:

How thick should plywood decking be assuming you are using joists 16" on
center?

In my earlier years, perhaps 20 years ago, I worked for a builder who
typically used 5/8 floor decking and 1/2" on the roof and exterior walls.
Now I'm faced with an architect that insists 3/4" on the floors is a must
and 5/8" on the roof and walls is needed.

Does the floor decking depend on the finish flooring. The builder I worked
with would always install wide plank 3/4" hardwood flooring. But when I
mentioned that to the architect, he insisted that I should still use 3/4"
decking under it. His concern was regarding the holding capacity of the
nails for the hardwood flooring and that it would avoid squeaky floors
later.

Any comments?


1/8" is minimum. I always use 3/16" hardboard paneling across 48"
spaced joists. Just be sure to run a strip of duct tape across the
joists every couple feet and be sure the carpeting is tight to support
any extra weight. I have found it satisfactory except the time I
moved a refrigerator and both I and the fridge fell thru into the
basement. I know I should have put more duct tape across the joists
where the fridge goes.
  #6  
Old February 27th 06, 02:57 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Plywood decking thickness


"Ken" wrote in message
...
How thick should plywood decking be assuming you are using joists 16" on
center?

In my earlier years, perhaps 20 years ago, I worked for a builder who
typically used 5/8 floor decking and 1/2" on the roof and exterior walls.
Now I'm faced with an architect that insists 3/4" on the floors is a must
and 5/8" on the roof and walls is needed.

Does the floor decking depend on the finish flooring. The builder I
worked with would always install wide plank 3/4" hardwood flooring. But
when I mentioned that to the architect, he insisted that I should still
use 3/4" decking under it. His concern was regarding the holding capacity
of the nails for the hardwood flooring and that it would avoid squeaky
floors later.


Our house (a raised ranch) was built in 1967. The floor joists are 16"
apart, the subfloor is 1/2" plywood with 3/4 tongue & groove oak over that.
The floor is squeaky everywhere and you can actually see it flex. In March,
we are having the main hallway and a smaller hallway/foyer floor ripped up
and new 3/4" subfloor and new 3/4 oak put in. It's a pity since the original
oak flooring is very handsome. We can't afford to redo the subfloor &
flooring on the entire house at this time.

If the builder had done it right the first time (put in 3/4" subfloor) we
wouldn't have to through all this expense and hassle now. So my advice is
to go with the 3/4" - you want that subfloor as stiff as possible.

Chris


  #7  
Old February 27th 06, 03:49 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Plywood decking thickness

On 2/26/06 4:30 PM, in article , "Ken"
wrote:

How thick should plywood decking be assuming you are using joists 16" on
center?


Anything less than 3/4" of the plywood you get today will be
unsatisfactory.. I used 1/2" on one of my floors and even though I'm only
150, I can still feel it give (1/2" underlayment, vinyl).. The rest of my
house I used 3/4" and it's rock solid.. Screw it down, too..


  #8  
Old February 27th 06, 06:24 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Plywood decking thickness

On Sun, 26 Feb 2006 16:30:22 -0500, "Ken" wrote:

How thick should plywood decking be assuming you are using joists 16" on
center?

In my earlier years, perhaps 20 years ago, I worked for a builder who
typically used 5/8 floor decking and 1/2" on the roof and exterior walls.
Now I'm faced with an architect that insists 3/4" on the floors is a must
and 5/8" on the roof and walls is needed.

Does the floor decking depend on the finish flooring. The builder I worked
with would always install wide plank 3/4" hardwood flooring. But when I
mentioned that to the architect, he insisted that I should still use 3/4"
decking under it. His concern was regarding the holding capacity of the
nails for the hardwood flooring and that it would avoid squeaky floors
later.

Any comments?



The architect is right, if you want a good floor.
the builder is right if all you want is one that's
code-compliant.

Of course, if you wanted a good solid L/480 or better
non-squeaking floor, I hope you're bringing that up
before the framing starts, cause you'll also want
depper joists, more blocking/bridging, glue, and
spiral-shank nails instead of whatever crap comes out
of the pnuematic nailer. All of which is going to
cost you extra.


  #9  
Old February 27th 06, 08:44 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Plywood decking thickness


"Chub" wrote in message
news

"chris jung" wrote in message
...

"Ken" wrote in message
...
How thick should plywood decking be assuming you are using joists 16" on
center?

In my earlier years, perhaps 20 years ago, I worked for a builder who
typically used 5/8 floor decking and 1/2" on the roof and exterior
walls. Now I'm faced with an architect that insists 3/4" on the floors
is a must and 5/8" on the roof and walls is needed.

Does the floor decking depend on the finish flooring. The builder I
worked with would always install wide plank 3/4" hardwood flooring.
But when I mentioned that to the architect, he insisted that I should
still use 3/4" decking under it. His concern was regarding the holding
capacity of the nails for the hardwood flooring and that it would avoid
squeaky floors later.


Our house (a raised ranch) was built in 1967. The floor joists are 16"
apart, the subfloor is 1/2" plywood with 3/4 tongue & groove oak over
that. The floor is squeaky everywhere and you can actually see it flex.
In March, we are having the main hallway and a smaller hallway/foyer
floor ripped up and new 3/4" subfloor and new 3/4 oak put in. It's a pity
since the original oak flooring is very handsome. We can't afford to redo
the subfloor & flooring on the entire house at this time.

If the builder had done it right the first time (put in 3/4" subfloor) we
wouldn't have to through all this expense and hassle now. So my advice
is to go with the 3/4" - you want that subfloor as stiff as possible.

Chris


why not just put new flooring on top and not go through ripping out old
stuff?

For a few reasons. First some background. We have a apartment in our lower
level. One bedroom is under the hallway and there is a metal furnace duct
running the length of the hallway between the joists and ceiling. Sound
(both airborne and through vibration) travels and is even amplified by that
duct. To stop this it's recommended to wrap the duct in Mass Loaded Vinyl
( go to http://www.soundproofing.org/ for more info). To get to the duct we
would have to either go from below (through 2 layers of drywall) or above.
We decided to get to it from above.

If we were having all the wood floor redone (1250 sq foot) then we would
consider having the old subfloor & oak floor screwed together to make a new
subfloor and then put a new floor on top. To put a new floor on the entire
1250 sf would cost a big chunk of change. And as well, the kitchen and 2
bathrooms are tile (at least they were done right) and we would end up with
them being at 3/4" lower than the wood floor. With our plan, the difference
in floor height between the tile and wood floor will be 1/4 inch.

And lastly our house is a split entry with two half flight of stairs leading
up to the wood floor. From what I understand, it's important that stair
risers are the same height otherwise people will catch their toes on the
highest step. I'm not sure if a 3/4" taller top step is a true safety issue
but it was one last factor that influenced our decision.

Chris


  #10  
Old February 28th 06, 12:46 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: n/a
Default Plywood decking thickness

Ken ) said...

How thick should plywood decking be assuming you are using joists 16" on
center?

In my earlier years, perhaps 20 years ago, I worked for a builder who
typically used 5/8 floor decking and 1/2" on the roof and exterior walls.
Now I'm faced with an architect that insists 3/4" on the floors is a must
and 5/8" on the roof and walls is needed.

Does the floor decking depend on the finish flooring. The builder I worked
with would always install wide plank 3/4" hardwood flooring. But when I
mentioned that to the architect, he insisted that I should still use 3/4"
decking under it. His concern was regarding the holding capacity of the
nails for the hardwood flooring and that it would avoid squeaky floors
later.


For floors, the subfloor makes a difference on how much it flexes. We used
an engineered system (I-joists) and the span capabilities depended on
the thickness of the subfloor (5/8 versus 3/4) and whether it was just
nailed or glued and nailed. For a firmer floor, we went with the 3/4"
and glued and screwed it in place. Only tongue & groove for the floor.

I used 5/8 T&G for the roof (24" O/C trusses), but the first framer I
hired balked at using this -- they often just use 3/8" plywood with H-clips.
I hired someone else to finish the roof.

My parents' home was build in 1963 and has 1/2" plywood on a stick-framed
structure that is 16" O/C -- there is no way I would use that on 24"!

As for wall sheathing, our code allows 1/4" OSB or plywood -- even 1"
styrofoam sheets can provide the anti-racking support that is needed.
I went with 7/16" OSB, but it starts at the sill plate. This means that
instead of two horizontal runs of sheathing on each 8' wall and short strips
at the end of the floor structure, the first course starts at the sill
and extends about 3' up the first floor walls with another course above it.
The third course of sheathing starts a foot below the top of the first
floor wall and continues to about 2' up the second floor wall. This IS
harder to install, but it provides extra anti-racking strength, plus it
provides a huricane tie between the walls and the floor structure (not
that we are in a huricane zone).

--
Calvin Henry-Cotnam
"I really think Canada should get over to Iraq as quickly as possible"
- Paul Martin - April 30, 2003
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