A DIY & home improvement forum. DIYbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DIYbanter forum » Do - it - Yourself » Home Repair
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Home Repair (alt.home.repair) For all homeowners and DIYers with many experienced tradesmen. Solve your toughest home fix-it problems.

Brass discoloration? ? ?



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old October 19th 05, 10:23 PM
Ray
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brass discoloration? ? ?

My cleaning lady cleaned a very old and lovely brass lamp that belonged to
my mother. Whatever she did, it looked fine at first, but now green stuff
is gathered in the creases of the embossing. In one or two places, it is
starting to turn black. I managed to rub away most of the black and some of
the green with a toothbrush, but not all, and it is tedious.

Any ideas welcome. Would vinegar and salt help?


Ads
  #2  
Old October 19th 05, 11:26 PM
Jeff Wisnia
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brass discoloration? ? ?

Ray wrote:
My cleaning lady cleaned a very old and lovely brass lamp that belonged to
my mother. Whatever she did, it looked fine at first, but now green stuff
is gathered in the creases of the embossing. In one or two places, it is
starting to turn black. I managed to rub away most of the black and some of
the green with a toothbrush, but not all, and it is tedious.



So are most cleaning ladies....


Any ideas welcome. Would vinegar and salt help?



You didn't say whether you want it to look "bright and shiny" or
"antiqued". If you want the former, then you'll have to get it spray
lacquered after its polished, or learn how to lacquer it yourself.

If you're willing to settle for it turning darker with age then yes,
vinegar and salt will help take off whatever's eating away at it now,
but make sure you wash it off quite well when you're through cleaning it.

HTH,

Jeff

--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"Truth exists; only falsehood has to be invented."
  #3  
Old October 19th 05, 11:54 PM
Roger Taylor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brass discoloration? ? ?

"Ray" wrote in message
news:mPy5f.8233$Yk6.3577@trnddc01...
My cleaning lady cleaned a very old and lovely brass lamp that belonged to
my mother. Whatever she did, it looked fine at first, but now green stuff
is gathered in the creases of the embossing. In one or two places, it is
starting to turn black. I managed to rub away most of the black and some
of the green with a toothbrush, but not all, and it is tedious.
Any ideas welcome. Would vinegar and salt help?


She may have used a paste polish or cleaner with ammonia or chlorine in it..
Either one will react with the copper in the brass, if the lacquer is worn
off in places, and produce either copper chloride or another salt, most of
which are colored green. There are some good care hints at
http://www.englishcustompolishing.co...sscopper1.html
which i found on Google. Basically, you could use a small soft brush or
rag, hot water, and mild detergent to get all the traces of of green off,
then use a fine brass polish *very* sparingly, and follow the instructions
above. The engraving tends to hold any compounds, so some care must be used
in completely removing all polish trapped by the grooves.


  #4  
Old October 19th 05, 11:58 PM
PipeDown
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brass discoloration? ? ?

You describe tarnish, though the colors sound as much like copper as brass.
There are plenty of brass cleaners in the supermarket, just pick one and
follow the directions. After is is clean, you can buy a brass sealer
(hardware store, maybe drug store) and it will stay looking clean and shiny.

If it is an antique, consult an antique dealer before cleaning again to be
sure you are not destroying its value by removing the patina.

Vinigar and salt is exactly opposite of what you want to do. It will
accelerate and cause the tarnish.


"Ray" wrote in message
news:mPy5f.8233$Yk6.3577@trnddc01...
My cleaning lady cleaned a very old and lovely brass lamp that belonged to
my mother. Whatever she did, it looked fine at first, but now green stuff
is gathered in the creases of the embossing. In one or two places, it is
starting to turn black. I managed to rub away most of the black and some
of the green with a toothbrush, but not all, and it is tedious.

Any ideas welcome. Would vinegar and salt help?



 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Replacement Brass Tub Drain Ryan Home Repair 3 August 9th 05 02:42 PM
Pressing drill rod into brass. [email protected] Metalworking 32 May 24th 05 02:17 AM
Fast Brass Antiquing [email protected] Woodworking 2 December 19th 04 04:38 PM
melting brass padlocks mongke Metalworking 4 January 25th 04 09:33 AM
Brass drill bit (for lead) Alaric B Snell Metalworking 18 September 30th 03 09:33 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2004-2014 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.