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Furnace fuel oil pump return line, install or not?



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 28th 05, 04:29 PM
[email protected]
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Default Furnace fuel oil pump return line, install or not?

I have a question on the pros, cons and necessity of a return line on a
oil pump for my furnace. I had to replace my faulty pump, but it was
not the same manufacturer. The original pump on the furnace was
plumbed with a return line to the oil tank. The tank was at the same
level as the furnace (in basement) and the oil lines rose to the
ceiling from the tank, then down to the furnace.
I understand this is necessary for priming the line in the event the
tank runs dry, the pump is able to pull the fuel up the line because of
the return line.
When I replaced the tank several years ago, I placed it outside the
home, about 8 feet above the level of the furnace. This gives me good
gravity feed, but I kept the return line to the tank because I did not
know how to reconfigure the pump. I was informed that it may not be as
simple as plugging the return port, internal adjustments may also be
involved, so I left the return line in place.
As time went on, the oil pump failed last year, I did not attach the
return line to the new pump because the instructions stated that single
line operation was the default for this new pump.
My questions are, is there any advantage to plumbing the return line to
the new pump, eventhough this is self priming with the gravity feed?
Better filtering because the oil is passed thru the oil filter more
often? Would this cause damage to the new pump because the pump would
be pushing fuel up to the new location of the tank? Or would this help
the pump last longer by easing its operations?
The return line is already installed to the tank, so there is no added
cost or work. The instructions for this new pump state that only the
bleed/return plug needs to be removed and the line attached for return
line operation, no internal adjustments necessary.

Thanks in advance
Mike..

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  #2  
Old September 28th 05, 08:38 PM
SQLit
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Posts: n/a
Default


wrote in message
oups.com...
I have a question on the pros, cons and necessity of a return line on a
oil pump for my furnace. I had to replace my faulty pump, but it was
not the same manufacturer. The original pump on the furnace was
plumbed with a return line to the oil tank. The tank was at the same
level as the furnace (in basement) and the oil lines rose to the
ceiling from the tank, then down to the furnace.
I understand this is necessary for priming the line in the event the
tank runs dry, the pump is able to pull the fuel up the line because of
the return line.
When I replaced the tank several years ago, I placed it outside the
home, about 8 feet above the level of the furnace. This gives me good
gravity feed, but I kept the return line to the tank because I did not
know how to reconfigure the pump. I was informed that it may not be as
simple as plugging the return port, internal adjustments may also be
involved, so I left the return line in place.
As time went on, the oil pump failed last year, I did not attach the
return line to the new pump because the instructions stated that single
line operation was the default for this new pump.
My questions are, is there any advantage to plumbing the return line to
the new pump, eventhough this is self priming with the gravity feed?
Better filtering because the oil is passed thru the oil filter more
often? Would this cause damage to the new pump because the pump would
be pushing fuel up to the new location of the tank? Or would this help
the pump last longer by easing its operations?
The return line is already installed to the tank, so there is no added
cost or work. The instructions for this new pump state that only the
bleed/return plug needs to be removed and the line attached for return
line operation, no internal adjustments necessary.

Thanks in advance
Mike..



All of the pumps that I deal with that have return lines are for constant
pressure at the point of use. Having a return line allows for the fluid to
be properly pressurized, having the excess return to the tank.

Check with the manufacture of the boiler to be sure.
Me thinks if it was installed in the beginning it is meant to be there.


  #3  
Old September 28th 05, 11:36 PM
Dr. Hardcrab
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Posts: n/a
Default

Even though you have "gravity feed", if you let the tank run out, you are
still going to have to "prime the pump". Since it is gravity fed, it will be
much EASIER to prime it, but you still have to prime it. Once you learn how
to prime it, it's not hard to do yourself.

The debate is still out on whether a 2 line is better than one.


wrote in message
oups.com...
I have a question on the pros, cons and necessity of a return line on a
oil pump for my furnace. I had to replace my faulty pump, but it was
not the same manufacturer. The original pump on the furnace was
plumbed with a return line to the oil tank. The tank was at the same
level as the furnace (in basement) and the oil lines rose to the
ceiling from the tank, then down to the furnace.
I understand this is necessary for priming the line in the event the
tank runs dry, the pump is able to pull the fuel up the line because of
the return line.
When I replaced the tank several years ago, I placed it outside the
home, about 8 feet above the level of the furnace. This gives me good
gravity feed, but I kept the return line to the tank because I did not
know how to reconfigure the pump. I was informed that it may not be as
simple as plugging the return port, internal adjustments may also be
involved, so I left the return line in place.
As time went on, the oil pump failed last year, I did not attach the
return line to the new pump because the instructions stated that single
line operation was the default for this new pump.
My questions are, is there any advantage to plumbing the return line to
the new pump, eventhough this is self priming with the gravity feed?
Better filtering because the oil is passed thru the oil filter more
often? Would this cause damage to the new pump because the pump would
be pushing fuel up to the new location of the tank? Or would this help
the pump last longer by easing its operations?
The return line is already installed to the tank, so there is no added
cost or work. The instructions for this new pump state that only the
bleed/return plug needs to be removed and the line attached for return
line operation, no internal adjustments necessary.

Thanks in advance
Mike..



  #4  
Old September 29th 05, 02:36 AM
HeatMan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

www.oiltechtalk.com


wrote in message
oups.com...
I have a question on the pros, cons and necessity of a return line on a
oil pump for my furnace. I had to replace my faulty pump, but it was
not the same manufacturer. The original pump on the furnace was
plumbed with a return line to the oil tank. The tank was at the same
level as the furnace (in basement) and the oil lines rose to the
ceiling from the tank, then down to the furnace.
I understand this is necessary for priming the line in the event the
tank runs dry, the pump is able to pull the fuel up the line because of
the return line.
When I replaced the tank several years ago, I placed it outside the
home, about 8 feet above the level of the furnace. This gives me good
gravity feed, but I kept the return line to the tank because I did not
know how to reconfigure the pump. I was informed that it may not be as
simple as plugging the return port, internal adjustments may also be
involved, so I left the return line in place.
As time went on, the oil pump failed last year, I did not attach the
return line to the new pump because the instructions stated that single
line operation was the default for this new pump.
My questions are, is there any advantage to plumbing the return line to
the new pump, eventhough this is self priming with the gravity feed?
Better filtering because the oil is passed thru the oil filter more
often? Would this cause damage to the new pump because the pump would
be pushing fuel up to the new location of the tank? Or would this help
the pump last longer by easing its operations?
The return line is already installed to the tank, so there is no added
cost or work. The instructions for this new pump state that only the
bleed/return plug needs to be removed and the line attached for return
line operation, no internal adjustments necessary.

Thanks in advance
Mike..



 




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