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How to attach new roof to side of house?



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 22nd 05, 12:37 AM
User Example
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Default How to attach new roof to side of house?

The back of my 2 story house has a concrete patio. I would like to
build a roof over the patio. I am not sure how to attach the roof to
the house, though. The back of the house has the 1st floor bricked and
the 2nd floor has wood siding over the 2x4s. There are no windows in
the way so that makes it a little easier. But what would be the best
way to attach the roof to the house so that its weight is properly
supported?
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  #2  
Old August 22nd 05, 02:58 AM
Colbyt
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"User Example" wrote in message
. ..
The back of my 2 story house has a concrete patio. I would like to
build a roof over the patio. I am not sure how to attach the roof to
the house, though. The back of the house has the 1st floor bricked and
the 2nd floor has wood siding over the 2x4s. There are no windows in
the way so that makes it a little easier. But what would be the best
way to attach the roof to the house so that its weight is properly
supported?


Codes vary from area to area but a general answer for a shed roof (that is a
single incline from the house to the yard) would be to remove a strip or two
of the wood siding then bolt a ledger board to the existing sill or stud
wall. Use joist hangers nailed to the ledger board and support the yard side
with a header and posts of correct size.

Of course there is a good bit of planning before you tear the first board
off. You have to get the proper pitch on the roof so you start with the
height of the roof at the yard edge of the porch and work backwards to
compute where it will attach to the house.

This is a real simple explanation


Colbyt



  #3  
Old August 22nd 05, 03:07 AM
User Example
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Posts: n/a
Default

The back of my 2 story house has a concrete patio. I would like to
build a roof over the patio. I am not sure how to attach the roof to
the house, though. The back of the house has the 1st floor bricked and
the 2nd floor has wood siding over the 2x4s. There are no windows in
the way so that makes it a little easier. But what would be the best
way to attach the roof to the house so that its weight is properly
supported?



Codes vary from area to area but a general answer for a shed roof (that is a
single incline from the house to the yard) would be to remove a strip or two
of the wood siding then bolt a ledger board to the existing sill or stud
wall. Use joist hangers nailed to the ledger board and support the yard side
with a header and posts of correct size.


That's sort of what I had in mind. I'm just wondering if the wall made
of 2x4's is strong enough to bolt the side of a roof to that has rafters
made of 2x6's.

  #4  
Old August 22nd 05, 04:49 PM
No
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Posts: n/a
Default

For a small overhang you can probably use 2x4s for rafters. Use posts or
brackets to support.
"User Example" wrote in message
. ..
The back of my 2 story house has a concrete patio. I would like to
build a roof over the patio. I am not sure how to attach the roof to
the house, though. The back of the house has the 1st floor bricked and
the 2nd floor has wood siding over the 2x4s. There are no windows in
the way so that makes it a little easier. But what would be the best
way to attach the roof to the house so that its weight is properly
supported?



Codes vary from area to area but a general answer for a shed roof (that
is a
single incline from the house to the yard) would be to remove a strip or
two
of the wood siding then bolt a ledger board to the existing sill or stud
wall. Use joist hangers nailed to the ledger board and support the yard
side
with a header and posts of correct size.


That's sort of what I had in mind. I'm just wondering if the wall made of
2x4's is strong enough to bolt the side of a roof to that has rafters made
of 2x6's.



  #5  
Old August 22nd 05, 09:42 PM
Colbyt
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Posts: n/a
Default


"User Example" wrote in message
. ..
The back of my 2 story house has a concrete patio. I would like to
build a roof over the patio. I am not sure how to attach the roof to
the house, though. The back of the house has the 1st floor bricked and
the 2nd floor has wood siding over the 2x4s. There are no windows in
the way so that makes it a little easier. But what would be the best
way to attach the roof to the house so that its weight is properly
supported?



Codes vary from area to area but a general answer for a shed roof (that

is a
single incline from the house to the yard) would be to remove a strip or

two
of the wood siding then bolt a ledger board to the existing sill or stud
wall. Use joist hangers nailed to the ledger board and support the yard

side
with a header and posts of correct size.


That's sort of what I had in mind. I'm just wondering if the wall made
of 2x4's is strong enough to bolt the side of a roof to that has rafters
made of 2x6's.


Your ledger plate will most likely need to be a 2x8, maybe a 2x10 to allow
the 2x6 rafter to rest fully against it after the angle is cut. The weight
transfer is down. The load is divided between the stud wall and the
header/posts on the other end.

Unless you have a heavy snow load to factor in I think you will be fine. I
just rebuilt one this way on an inspected job site. There were no
complaints from the inspector. There just isn't that much weight involved. I
still suggest a call or visit to your local building inspection office.

Colbyt


  #6  
Old August 22nd 05, 11:13 PM
User Example
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Posts: n/a
Default

with a header and posts of correct size.

That's sort of what I had in mind. I'm just wondering if the wall made
of 2x4's is strong enough to bolt the side of a roof to that has rafters
made of 2x6's.



Your ledger plate will most likely need to be a 2x8, maybe a 2x10 to allow
the 2x6 rafter to rest fully against it after the angle is cut. The weight
transfer is down. The load is divided between the stud wall and the
header/posts on the other end.

Unless you have a heavy snow load to factor in I think you will be fine. I
just rebuilt one this way on an inspected job site. There were no
complaints from the inspector. There just isn't that much weight involved. I
still suggest a call or visit to your local building inspection office.

Colbyt

Thanks. I will give them a call and see what references they recommend.

Gary
  #7  
Old August 23rd 05, 03:32 AM
Harry K
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Posts: n/a
Default


Colbyt wrote:
"User Example" wrote in message
. ..
The back of my 2 story house has a concrete patio. I would like to
build a roof over the patio. I am not sure how to attach the roof to
the house, though. The back of the house has the 1st floor bricked and
the 2nd floor has wood siding over the 2x4s. There are no windows in
the way so that makes it a little easier. But what would be the best
way to attach the roof to the house so that its weight is properly
supported?


Codes vary from area to area but a general answer for a shed roof (that

is a
single incline from the house to the yard) would be to remove a strip or

two
of the wood siding then bolt a ledger board to the existing sill or stud
wall. Use joist hangers nailed to the ledger board and support the yard

side
with a header and posts of correct size.


That's sort of what I had in mind. I'm just wondering if the wall made
of 2x4's is strong enough to bolt the side of a roof to that has rafters
made of 2x6's.


Your ledger plate will most likely need to be a 2x8, maybe a 2x10 to allow
the 2x6 rafter to rest fully against it after the angle is cut. The weight
transfer is down. The load is divided between the stud wall and the
header/posts on the other end.

Unless you have a heavy snow load to factor in I think you will be fine. I
just rebuilt one this way on an inspected job site. There were no
complaints from the inspector. There just isn't that much weight involved. I
still suggest a call or visit to your local building inspection office.

Colbyt


As to weights and building inspectors: I rebuilt my patio roof several
years ago. Fortunately the permit was issued by a clerk "to
repair/reroof porch roof". The inspector's idea of a suitable roof was
one I could have parked a D8 cat on. I convinced him that since I was
using the same roof framing (including the 2x4 rafters) it complied
with "repair" and that the old roof had held for over 30 years. I did
bend and used 2x6 for 1/2 of it but he really wanted 2x8.

Harry K

 




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