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How much water do high-efficiency furnaces need to drain?



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 9th 05, 02:18 PM
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Default How much water do high-efficiency furnaces need to drain?

On a typical winter day for those living in cold climates, how much
water (condensation) is produced by a high-efficiency furnace per day?
I've heard ranges from barely anything to 5 gallons per day.

And would this amount to more or less than what is produced by a
central air conditioner?

Thanks.

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  #2  
Old August 9th 05, 08:50 PM
SQLit
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wrote in message
oups.com...
On a typical winter day for those living in cold climates, how much
water (condensation) is produced by a high-efficiency furnace per day?
I've heard ranges from barely anything to 5 gallons per day.

And would this amount to more or less than what is produced by a
central air conditioner?

Thanks.


With out humidity numbers anything would be a wild ass guess.


  #3  
Old August 10th 05, 12:01 AM
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wrote:

On a typical winter day for those living in cold climates, how much
water (condensation) is produced by a high-efficiency furnace per day?


You might figure about 5% of the fuel's heating value for oil, ie
0.05x140KBtu/1000 = 7 pounds per gallon, eg 42 lb/day of water, if
you burn 6 gal/day of oil, and about twice that for natural gas.

And would this amount to more or less than what is produced by a
central air conditioner?


Depends on the humidity and house air leakage rate. If wi = 0.00787
(80 F at 50% RH) inside and wa = 0.0130 (Phila in July) and a 2400 ft^2
house leaks 224 cfm (a 0.7 ACH average), the AC needs to remove at least
24hx60x224x0.075(wa-wi) = 124 pounds of water per day.

Nick

  #4  
Old August 10th 05, 01:53 AM
Colbyt
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wrote in message
oups.com...
On a typical winter day for those living in cold climates, how much
water (condensation) is produced by a high-efficiency furnace per day?
I've heard ranges from barely anything to 5 gallons per day.

And would this amount to more or less than what is produced by a
central air conditioner?



This from personal recollections. I would guess about a quart per day. Ours
discharged over the driveway and I never saw a ice stalagmite over a foot
tall after several below freezing days in a row.

The AC output will vary greatly with humidity but something around 5 gallons
per day would be realistic here and now.

Colbyt


  #5  
Old August 10th 05, 02:30 PM
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Colbyt wrote:
wrote in message
oups.com...
On a typical winter day for those living in cold climates, how much
water (condensation) is produced by a high-efficiency furnace per day?
I've heard ranges from barely anything to 5 gallons per day.

And would this amount to more or less than what is produced by a
central air conditioner?



This from personal recollections. I would guess about a quart per day. Ours
discharged over the driveway and I never saw a ice stalagmite over a foot
tall after several below freezing days in a row.

The AC output will vary greatly with humidity but something around 5 gallons
per day would be realistic here and now.

Colbyt


Thanks for the input. Have you noticed any discoloration of your
driveway? I've read that the water run-off from condensation of a gas
furnace is acidic, with a pH roughly the same as orange juice.

  #6  
Old August 10th 05, 09:41 PM
Colbyt
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wrote in message
ups.com...

Thanks for the input. Have you noticed any discoloration of your
driveway? I've read that the water run-off from condensation of a gas
furnace is acidic, with a pH roughly the same as orange juice.


We sold that house about 10 years ago. During the 8 or so years that I saw
it drip there I did not see any. It was a blacktop drive. YMMV on concrete
because of the chemistry involved.

Colbyt


  #7  
Old August 10th 05, 10:54 PM
HeatMan
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"Colbyt" wrote in message
news:embKe.237526$_o.224405@attbi_s71...

wrote in message
oups.com...
On a typical winter day for those living in cold climates, how much
water (condensation) is produced by a high-efficiency furnace per day?
I've heard ranges from barely anything to 5 gallons per day.

And would this amount to more or less than what is produced by a
central air conditioner?



This from personal recollections. I would guess about a quart per day.

Ours
discharged over the driveway and I never saw a ice stalagmite over a foot
tall after several below freezing days in a row.

The AC output will vary greatly with humidity but something around 5

gallons
per day would be realistic here and now.


I've never measured it, but one customer with a 5 ton system says he gets
about a gallon per hour of run time for his system. This is in 'normal'
weather, nit high humidity conditions....


 




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