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Using 100 watt bulb in 60 watt lamp



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 23rd 05, 07:11 PM
tenplay
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Default Using 100 watt bulb in 60 watt lamp

As I get older, I am needing more light to read and tasks. I have a
couple of lamps that are rated at 60 watts. Is there any harm in using
higher wattage bulbs to increase the illumination? Thanks.
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  #2  
Old July 23rd 05, 07:18 PM
Paul Franklin
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On Sat, 23 Jul 2005 11:11:30 -0700, tenplay wrote:

As I get older, I am needing more light to read and tasks. I have a
couple of lamps that are rated at 60 watts. Is there any harm in using
higher wattage bulbs to increase the illumination? Thanks.


Yes, often they will overheat. A 100 bulb puts out a lot more heat.
This can melt plastic parts, or even damage the bulb socket and
wiring.

What you can do is replace with a compact flourescent. A 60 watt CF
gives out as much or more light than a 100 watt incandescent but runs
cooler. They are available in shapes that will screw into a standard
lamp socket.

HTH,

Paul

  #3  
Old July 23rd 05, 07:21 PM
udarrell
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tenplay wrote:

As I get older, I am needing more light to read and tasks. I have a
couple of lamps that are rated at 60 watts. Is there any harm in
using higher wattage bulbs to increase the illumination? Thanks.


100 watt bulb produces a lot more heat than a 60 watt bulb and cold
cause a dangerous fire situation! - udarrell

--
Optimizing Air-Conditioner Efficiency
http://www.udarrell.com/air-conditio...ator-coil.html
  #4  
Old July 23rd 05, 07:31 PM
Dan C
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On Sat, 23 Jul 2005 13:21:56 -0500, udarrell wrote:

100 watt bulb produces a lot more heat than a 60 watt bulb and cold
cause a dangerous fire situation! - udarrell


It cold? Oh my!

--
If you're not on the edge, you're taking up too much space.
Linux Registered User #327951

  #5  
Old July 23rd 05, 07:32 PM
Dan C
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On Sat, 23 Jul 2005 11:11:30 -0700, tenplay wrote:

As I get older, I am needing more light to read and tasks. I have a
couple of lamps that are rated at 60 watts. Is there any harm in using
higher wattage bulbs to increase the illumination? Thanks.


What would you *think* the answer to this question would be? Why do you
think the manufacturers bother to put ratings and warnings on things?

Were you born this dumb?

--
If you're not on the edge, you're taking up too much space.
Linux Registered User #327951

  #6  
Old July 23rd 05, 08:04 PM
RBM
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Default

What would you *think* the answer to this question would be? Why do you
think the manufacturers bother to put ratings and warnings on things?

My personal opinion is that it has more to do with liability than safety. In
the electrical and lighting industry the materials used over the last forty
or so years have improved greatly yet in the case of the lighting industry
the allowable wattage keeps decreasing. It's routine for a lighting fixture
to have a warning not to connect it to wiring rated at less than 90 degrees,
like your going to rewire eighty percent of the houses that want to install
fixtures in them. I don't think so. I'm sure a good portion of these ratings
is just to pass the liability on to you the installer or the consumer








"Dan C" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 23 Jul 2005 11:11:30 -0700, tenplay wrote:

As I get older, I am needing more light to read and tasks. I have a
couple of lamps that are rated at 60 watts. Is there any harm in using
higher wattage bulbs to increase the illumination? Thanks.


What would you *think* the answer to this question would be? Why do you
think the manufacturers bother to put ratings and warnings on things?

Were you born this dumb?

--
If you're not on the edge, you're taking up too much space.
Linux Registered User #327951



  #7  
Old July 23rd 05, 08:15 PM
Doug Miller
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Default

In article , "RBM" rbm2(remove wrote:
What would you *think* the answer to this question would be? Why do you

think the manufacturers bother to put ratings and warnings on things?

My personal opinion is that it has more to do with liability than safety.

[snip]
I'm sure a good portion of these ratings
is just to pass the liability on to you the installer or the consumer


Your personal opinion, however, is incorrect. It has everything to do with
safety. I've had the misfortune of needing to replace numerous light fixtures
that previous homeowners used 100W bulbs in, despite the clear warnings
"Danger risk of fire use 60W max". The excessive heat of the 100W bulbs has,
in every case, severely damaged the fixture wires, causing the insulation to
harden, crack, and fall off.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

It's time to throw all their damned tea in the harbor again.
  #8  
Old July 23rd 05, 08:26 PM
RBM
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Default

Doug, I've seen that many times myself. There are certainly types of
fixtures that mount close to ceilings that produce a lot of heat and are
fire hazards, however I still believe that a lot of these ratings are more
for liability than safety
"Doug Miller" wrote in message
m...
In article , "RBM" rbm2(remove
wrote:
What would you *think* the answer to this question would be? Why do you

think the manufacturers bother to put ratings and warnings on things?

My personal opinion is that it has more to do with liability than safety.

[snip]
I'm sure a good portion of these ratings
is just to pass the liability on to you the installer or the consumer


Your personal opinion, however, is incorrect. It has everything to do with
safety. I've had the misfortune of needing to replace numerous light
fixtures
that previous homeowners used 100W bulbs in, despite the clear warnings
"Danger risk of fire use 60W max". The excessive heat of the 100W bulbs
has,
in every case, severely damaged the fixture wires, causing the insulation
to
harden, crack, and fall off.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

It's time to throw all their damned tea in the harbor again.



  #9  
Old July 23rd 05, 08:30 PM
Joseph Meehan
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Posts: n/a
Default

RBM wrote:
Doug, I've seen that many times myself. There are certainly types of
fixtures that mount close to ceilings that produce a lot of heat and
are fire hazards, however I still believe that a lot of these ratings
are more for liability than safety


So do you suggest the homeowner take the chance? Maybe it will not
burn you home down.

"Doug Miller" wrote in message
m...
In article , "RBM" rbm2(remove
wrote:
What would you *think* the answer to this question would be? Why
do you
think the manufacturers bother to put ratings and warnings on things?

My personal opinion is that it has more to do with liability than
safety. [snip] I'm sure a good portion of these ratings
is just to pass the liability on to you the installer or the consumer


Your personal opinion, however, is incorrect. It has everything to
do with safety. I've had the misfortune of needing to replace
numerous light fixtures
that previous homeowners used 100W bulbs in, despite the clear
warnings "Danger risk of fire use 60W max". The excessive heat of
the 100W bulbs has,
in every case, severely damaged the fixture wires, causing the
insulation to
harden, crack, and fall off.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

It's time to throw all their damned tea in the harbor again.


--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit


  #10  
Old July 23rd 05, 08:41 PM
Doug Miller
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Posts: n/a
Default

In article , "RBM" rbm2(remove wrote:
Doug, I've seen that many times myself. There are certainly types of
fixtures that mount close to ceilings that produce a lot of heat and are
fire hazards,


No, it's not the fixture that's a fire hazard. The hazard is in using bulbs
that are too hot for the fixture. That's why limits are posted.

however I still believe that a lot of these ratings are more
for liability than safety


Believe what you wish. The fact remains that, when installed correctly and
used with bulbs that do not exceed their rating, fixtures of any type are safe
- and the use of bulbs that do exceed the rating can be dangerous.


--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

It's time to throw all their damned tea in the harbor again.
 




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