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Teflon tape on gas pipe??



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 19th 05, 06:03 PM
Steven L Umbach
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Default Teflon tape on gas pipe??

I replaced my water heater yesterday and used a flexible gas pipe to
reconnect natural gas to it. I used my white Teflon tape on the fittings for
a seal and all appears well. Then I noticed some info on the internet that
you should not use white Teflon tape on gas fittings - only yellow.
Apparently there is a risk [don't know how great] that the white tape can
damage the gas regulator or such due to bits of it shredding off. Now I am
wondering if I should change it or just leave it. My thinking is that
removing/reinstalling the fittings may introduce more risk that just leaving
well enough alone? The gas heater is installed in the basement next to the
furnace right next to a floor drain. Any advice appreciated. --- Steve


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  #2  
Old June 19th 05, 06:14 PM
DanG
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Default


Teflon is Teflon. Apparently some manufacturers offer a heavier
tape. It may or may not be less subject to shredding. It has
always been important to keep the tape back off the lead threads.
I know a few plumbers that do both Teflon (white, by the way) and
pipe dope on the larger size pipe - 1 1/2" and up. When I asked
why I got the belt and suspenders type answer.

Do not take something apart that is functioning.

(top posted for your convenience)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Keep the whole world singing . . . .
DanG (remove the sevens)




"Steven L Umbach" wrote in
message ...
I replaced my water heater yesterday and used a flexible gas pipe
to reconnect natural gas to it. I used my white Teflon tape on
the fittings for a seal and all appears well. Then I noticed some
info on the internet that you should not use white Teflon tape on
gas fittings - only yellow. Apparently there is a risk [don't
know how great] that the white tape can damage the gas regulator
or such due to bits of it shredding off. Now I am wondering if I
should change it or just leave it. My thinking is that
removing/reinstalling the fittings may introduce more risk that
just leaving well enough alone? The gas heater is installed in
the basement next to the furnace right next to a floor drain. Any
advice appreciated. --- Steve



  #3  
Old June 19th 05, 06:48 PM
Ralph Mowery
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Steven L Umbach" wrote in message
...
I replaced my water heater yesterday and used a flexible gas pipe to
reconnect natural gas to it. I used my white Teflon tape on the fittings

for
a seal and all appears well. Then I noticed some info on the internet that
you should not use white Teflon tape on gas fittings - only yellow.
Apparently there is a risk [don't know how great] that the white tape can
damage the gas regulator or such due to bits of it shredding off. Now I am
wondering if I should change it or just leave it. My thinking is that
removing/reinstalling the fittings may introduce more risk that just

leaving
well enough alone? The gas heater is installed in the basement next to the
furnace right next to a floor drain. Any advice appreciated. --- Steve

Here is the differance in the colors of the tape. Seems the yellow is just
thicker.

http://www.cleanfit.com/tapes.htm




  #4  
Old June 19th 05, 10:12 PM
toller
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Posts: n/a
Default

In general, the yellow is thicker and higher density.
I would redo it. Aren't you going to feel silly if you have a problem
because you didn't want to do 20 minutes work?


  #5  
Old June 19th 05, 10:40 PM
Stormin Mormon
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Default

I was taught to use white teflon, and also Rectorseal. The teflon allows the
threads to slip tighter, and the Rectorseal does the acutal sealing.

--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
www.mormons.com


"DanG" wrote in message
news:aKhte.1862$Lr4.587@fed1read03...

Teflon is Teflon. Apparently some manufacturers offer a heavier
tape. It may or may not be less subject to shredding. It has
always been important to keep the tape back off the lead threads.
I know a few plumbers that do both Teflon (white, by the way) and
pipe dope on the larger size pipe - 1 1/2" and up. When I asked
why I got the belt and suspenders type answer.

Do not take something apart that is functioning.

(top posted for your convenience)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Keep the whole world singing . . . .
DanG (remove the sevens)




"Steven L Umbach" wrote in
message ...
I replaced my water heater yesterday and used a flexible gas pipe
to reconnect natural gas to it. I used my white Teflon tape on
the fittings for a seal and all appears well. Then I noticed some
info on the internet that you should not use white Teflon tape on
gas fittings - only yellow. Apparently there is a risk [don't
know how great] that the white tape can damage the gas regulator
or such due to bits of it shredding off. Now I am wondering if I
should change it or just leave it. My thinking is that
removing/reinstalling the fittings may introduce more risk that
just leaving well enough alone? The gas heater is installed in
the basement next to the furnace right next to a floor drain. Any
advice appreciated. --- Steve




  #6  
Old June 20th 05, 12:03 AM
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I would replace it with either the gas-rated tape, or the old-fashoined
gooey pipe sealer. The typical white teflon tape is not to code, or so
I have been told by a plumber I happened to ask at the hardware store,
who was most emphatic.

  #7  
Old June 20th 05, 02:26 AM
Robert Allison
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Posts: n/a
Default

Steven L Umbach wrote:
I replaced my water heater yesterday and used a flexible gas pipe to
reconnect natural gas to it. I used my white Teflon tape on the fittings for
a seal and all appears well. Then I noticed some info on the internet that
you should not use white Teflon tape on gas fittings - only yellow.
Apparently there is a risk [don't know how great] that the white tape can
damage the gas regulator or such due to bits of it shredding off. Now I am
wondering if I should change it or just leave it. My thinking is that
removing/reinstalling the fittings may introduce more risk that just leaving
well enough alone? The gas heater is installed in the basement next to the
furnace right next to a floor drain. Any advice appreciated. --- Steve



If the flex pipe has a flared fitting on both ends (and it
should if it is for gas), then there is no need to use
anything on the threads. The actual seal is between the flare
and the bell end of the fitting.

--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
Georgetown, TX
  #8  
Old June 20th 05, 05:40 PM
Steven L Umbach
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks for all the replies. All continues to work well and I verified that
the gas connections are leak free. I did some searching on the internet and
could not find any evidence of more than usual premature failures of gas
water heaters [gas delivery related] because of using white Teflon tape on
the gas pipe connection. My guess is that there probably is some sort of
inlet screen on the thermostat to stop large particles from getting into it.
Also I feel that disassembling it at this point could do more harm than good
due to all the Teflon tape that would come loose in the threads during the
removal process. Thanks again and next time for sure I will use the yellow
stuff. --- Steve


"Steven L Umbach" wrote in message
...
I replaced my water heater yesterday and used a flexible gas pipe to
reconnect natural gas to it. I used my white Teflon tape on the fittings
for a seal and all appears well. Then I noticed some info on the internet
that you should not use white Teflon tape on gas fittings - only yellow.
Apparently there is a risk [don't know how great] that the white tape can
damage the gas regulator or such due to bits of it shredding off. Now I am
wondering if I should change it or just leave it. My thinking is that
removing/reinstalling the fittings may introduce more risk that just
leaving well enough alone? The gas heater is installed in the basement next
to the furnace right next to a floor drain. Any advice appreciated. ---
Steve



  #9  
Old June 20th 05, 07:17 PM
CL (dnoyeB) Gilbert
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Steven L Umbach wrote:
Thanks for all the replies. All continues to work well and I verified that
the gas connections are leak free. I did some searching on the internet and
could not find any evidence of more than usual premature failures of gas
water heaters [gas delivery related] because of using white Teflon tape on
the gas pipe connection. My guess is that there probably is some sort of
inlet screen on the thermostat to stop large particles from getting into it.
Also I feel that disassembling it at this point could do more harm than good
due to all the Teflon tape that would come loose in the threads during the
removal process. Thanks again and next time for sure I will use the yellow
stuff. --- Steve


"Steven L Umbach" wrote in message
...

I replaced my water heater yesterday and used a flexible gas pipe to
reconnect natural gas to it. I used my white Teflon tape on the fittings
for a seal and all appears well. Then I noticed some info on the internet
that you should not use white Teflon tape on gas fittings - only yellow.
Apparently there is a risk [don't know how great] that the white tape can
damage the gas regulator or such due to bits of it shredding off. Now I am
wondering if I should change it or just leave it. My thinking is that
removing/reinstalling the fittings may introduce more risk that just
leaving well enough alone? The gas heater is installed in the basement next
to the furnace right next to a floor drain. Any advice appreciated. ---
Steve





I used the gooey stuff on mine. Each of my downward pipes that is going
into the heater or furnace as a T at the bottom with dead end let with a
cap on it. I guess any thing that goes down that pipe ends up in this
small dead in drop area. There are several of these.

Is there any specific amouont of torque that should be on a gas pipe?



--
Respectfully,


CL Gilbert
  #10  
Old June 20th 05, 10:38 PM
HeatMan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Stormin Mormon" wrote in message
...
I was taught to use white teflon, and also Rectorseal. The teflon allows

the
threads to slip tighter, and the Rectorseal does the acutal sealing.

--


Uh-huh.

You're a dumba** too...



Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
www.mormons.com


"DanG" wrote in message
news:aKhte.1862$Lr4.587@fed1read03...

Teflon is Teflon. Apparently some manufacturers offer a heavier
tape. It may or may not be less subject to shredding. It has
always been important to keep the tape back off the lead threads.
I know a few plumbers that do both Teflon (white, by the way) and
pipe dope on the larger size pipe - 1 1/2" and up. When I asked
why I got the belt and suspenders type answer.

Do not take something apart that is functioning.

(top posted for your convenience)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Keep the whole world singing . . . .
DanG (remove the sevens)




"Steven L Umbach" wrote in
message ...
I replaced my water heater yesterday and used a flexible gas pipe
to reconnect natural gas to it. I used my white Teflon tape on
the fittings for a seal and all appears well. Then I noticed some
info on the internet that you should not use white Teflon tape on
gas fittings - only yellow. Apparently there is a risk [don't
know how great] that the white tape can damage the gas regulator
or such due to bits of it shredding off. Now I am wondering if I
should change it or just leave it. My thinking is that
removing/reinstalling the fittings may introduce more risk that
just leaving well enough alone? The gas heater is installed in
the basement next to the furnace right next to a floor drain. Any
advice appreciated. --- Steve






 




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