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Drill drain hole in concrete planter?



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 6th 05, 12:55 AM
Airkings
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Default Drill drain hole in concrete planter?

I have a concrete planter (round cup-shaped top, stem, square base.
Urn-like, I guess), that doesn't have a drain hole. Is it possible or
feasible to drill a drain hole from the bottom of the "cup" through the
stem, and out the bottom of the base? It might be 7" or so. Will it crack
the concrete? Any other ideas? Thanks!

P.S. We really need some type of drainage, as the flowers are stunted and a
heavy rain just filled the bowl!

--
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Dave


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  #2  
Old June 6th 05, 01:11 AM
EvoDawg
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Airkings wrote:

I have a concrete planter (round cup-shaped top, stem, square base.
Urn-like, I guess), that doesn't have a drain hole. Is it possible or
feasible to drill a drain hole from the bottom of the "cup" through the
stem, and out the bottom of the base? It might be 7" or so. Will it crack
the concrete? Any other ideas? Thanks!

P.S. We really need some type of drainage, as the flowers are stunted and

a
heavy rain just filled the bowl!



sounds like a bird bath not a planter!!! It would probably crack since you
need to drill a hole in concrete with a hammer drill.

Rich
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  #3  
Old June 6th 05, 01:21 AM
Edwin Pawlowski
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"EvoDawg" wrote in message

sounds like a bird bath not a planter!!! It would probably crack since
you
need to drill a hole in concrete with a hammer drill.


Did the change the laws? I've drilled many a hole in concrete using a
regular drill and a carbide tipped masonry bit. I've made them to hold
electrical boxes, hose reels, deck post supports, planter hangers, etc.
Hammer drills are faster, but not needed.


  #4  
Old June 6th 05, 01:28 AM
EvoDawg
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:


"EvoDawg" wrote in message

sounds like a bird bath not a planter!!! It would probably crack since
you
need to drill a hole in concrete with a hammer drill.


Did the change the laws? I've drilled many a hole in concrete using a
regular drill and a carbide tipped masonry bit. I've made them to hold
electrical boxes, hose reels, deck post supports, planter hangers, etc.
Hammer drills are faster, but not needed.



Well I sure would not want to stand over a birdbath and drill a 7" long hole
with a regular drill and masonry bit. Youre talking about drilling a 1"
maybe a 2" at most with "regular drill and masonry bit. Wonder how long
that bit would last going thru 7 inches of cement?
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but you can't make them THINK"
  #5  
Old June 6th 05, 01:51 AM
Colbyt
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"Airkings" wrote in message
ink.net...
I have a concrete planter (round cup-shaped top, stem, square base.
Urn-like, I guess), that doesn't have a drain hole. Is it possible or
feasible to drill a drain hole from the bottom of the "cup" through the
stem, and out the bottom of the base? It might be 7" or so. Will it crack
the concrete? Any other ideas? Thanks!

P.S. We really need some type of drainage, as the flowers are stunted and

a
heavy rain just filled the bowl!


It might.

The concrete used in the planters high PSI and very small or no rocks. You
might not need "hammer mode". I have added drainage holes to others before
but not to the style you have.

If the stem is 4" around or more, you work slow on a padded surface and no
more than a 1/2" hole you most likely will be able to do it.

As an alternative you might consider drilling a couple of 1/4" holes from
the base of the bowl to the outside going sideways and down. Of course this
will only work if one side of the planter isn't high visibility. This option
is safer IMO.

Colbyt


  #6  
Old June 6th 05, 03:19 AM
Edwin Pawlowski
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"EvoDawg" wrote in message

Well I sure would not want to stand over a birdbath and drill a 7" long
hole
with a regular drill and masonry bit. Youre talking about drilling a 1"
maybe a 2" at most with "regular drill and masonry bit. Wonder how long
that bit would last going thru 7 inches of cement?


The good part is, you don't have to. That is the job of the OP. May take
some time, but it is possible. I'm not so sure the OP has to either. Not
all planters have drain holes. You put a couple of inches of stone in the
bottom though. Best to consult with someone that knows hot to plant in one
though.


  #7  
Old June 6th 05, 03:58 PM
SQLit
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"Airkings" wrote in message
ink.net...
I have a concrete planter (round cup-shaped top, stem, square base.
Urn-like, I guess), that doesn't have a drain hole. Is it possible or
feasible to drill a drain hole from the bottom of the "cup" through the
stem, and out the bottom of the base? It might be 7" or so. Will it crack
the concrete? Any other ideas? Thanks!

P.S. We really need some type of drainage, as the flowers are stunted and

a
heavy rain just filled the bowl!

--
x-no-archive: yes

Dave


Possible yes, difficult probably.

7 inches is a long way to go. My suggestion is to get a 1/4 masonary bit and
turn the urn over and start in drilling, without a hammer drill. See how
it goes. This will be a slow process. Once you have reached the end of the
bit it will be time to look for a longer one. You will probably need to
find a real supply store as the box stores may not have bits as long as you
need. You might try Harbor Freight. I would not put much bigger than 1/4 in
in the urn.


  #8  
Old June 6th 05, 05:33 PM
Ray
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May be a whole lot easier to drill through the side near the bottom.


"SQLit" wrote in message
...

"Airkings" wrote in message
ink.net...
I have a concrete planter (round cup-shaped top, stem, square base.
Urn-like, I guess), that doesn't have a drain hole. Is it possible or
feasible to drill a drain hole from the bottom of the "cup" through the
stem, and out the bottom of the base? It might be 7" or so. Will it crack
the concrete? Any other ideas? Thanks!

P.S. We really need some type of drainage, as the flowers are stunted and

a
heavy rain just filled the bowl!

--
x-no-archive: yes

Dave


Possible yes, difficult probably.

7 inches is a long way to go. My suggestion is to get a 1/4 masonary bit
and
turn the urn over and start in drilling, without a hammer drill. See how
it goes. This will be a slow process. Once you have reached the end of
the
bit it will be time to look for a longer one. You will probably need to
find a real supply store as the box stores may not have bits as long as
you
need. You might try Harbor Freight. I would not put much bigger than 1/4
in
in the urn.




  #9  
Old June 6th 05, 05:43 PM
Norminn
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Default



Airkings wrote:
I have a concrete planter (round cup-shaped top, stem, square base.
Urn-like, I guess), that doesn't have a drain hole. Is it possible or
feasible to drill a drain hole from the bottom of the "cup" through the
stem, and out the bottom of the base? It might be 7" or so. Will it crack
the concrete? Any other ideas? Thanks!

P.S. We really need some type of drainage, as the flowers are stunted and a
heavy rain just filled the bowl!


If you insist on keeping the planter exposed, there may be a couple of
ways around the problem. Replant the plants after putting a layer of
stone in bottom of planter. Fill the planter so the soil is mounded and
the plant at the same depth at soil surface. Pack well. Put on some
shredded cypress mulch. In heavy rain, water might run off rather than
collecting and flooding the planter. You could also - if feasible -
just lay the planter on it's side for an hour after a heavy rain. Or
put a clay pot inside so's you can lift out the plant and remove water.

  #10  
Old June 6th 05, 06:45 PM
Goedjn
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Default

On Mon, 6 Jun 2005 06:58:02 -0700, "SQLit" wrote:


"Airkings" wrote in message
link.net...
I have a concrete planter (round cup-shaped top, stem, square base.
Urn-like, I guess), that doesn't have a drain hole. Is it possible or
feasible to drill a drain hole from the bottom of the "cup" through the
stem, and out the bottom of the base? It might be 7" or so. Will it crack
the concrete? Any other ideas? Thanks!



It would be almost be easier to just cast a new planter, with the
drain-pipe pre-installed. Is this a one-peice thing, or is the
pedestal separate from the bowl?
 




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