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Pa electrical code



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 15th 05, 04:37 AM
Beeper
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Posts: n/a
Default Pa electrical code

Pennsylvania has adopted a new state code this year. Not being a licensed
electrician in the state of Pa, Am I permitted to do the wiring of my newly
constructed home so long as I comply with all inspections?
I am employed as an industrial electrician, Therefore I do not need to be
licensed at my job. If anything, what would I need to do, to do my own home
wiring. Again, new construction.


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  #2  
Old April 15th 05, 12:19 PM
Dan
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Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 22:37:39 -0400, "Beeper"
wrote:

Pennsylvania has adopted a new state code this year. Not being a licensed
electrician in the state of Pa, Am I permitted to do the wiring of my newly
constructed home so long as I comply with all inspections?
I am employed as an industrial electrician, Therefore I do not need to be
licensed at my job. If anything, what would I need to do, to do my own home
wiring. Again, new constru


Only your local building official can answer that question. I don't
mind people doing the work on their own homes, if they have the skills
to do it, and it sounds like you would. Your local official may have
different ideas, however.

Dan
  #3  
Old April 15th 05, 03:13 PM
Edwin Pawlowski
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Beeper" wrote in message
...
Pennsylvania has adopted a new state code this year. Not being a licensed
electrician in the state of Pa, Am I permitted to do the wiring of my
newly constructed home so long as I comply with all inspections?
I am employed as an industrial electrician, Therefore I do not need to
be licensed at my job. If anything, what would I need to do, to do my own
home wiring. Again, new construction.


Wiring must be done to code and if you knew the code you'd know the answer
to that question.

Check with your local building official. In many cases you have to pull the
permit and of course have the usual inspections. Best to check as there may
be some local issues you need to comply with.


  #4  
Old April 15th 05, 05:52 PM
The Real Tom
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Default

On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 22:37:39 -0400, "Beeper"
wrote:

Pennsylvania has adopted a new state code this year. Not being a licensed


Word is 2005NEC shouldn't be adopted till june. That is why
residental license exams are still using 2002 material.

electrician in the state of Pa, Am I permitted to do the wiring of my newly
constructed home so long as I comply with all inspections?


You have to check with your local jursidiction.

I am employed as an industrial electrician, Therefore I do not need to be
licensed at my job. If anything, what would I need to do, to do my own home
wiring. Again, new construction.


Legally, you need to check with your local authority having
jursidiction.

Personally, I wouldn't plan out my home till I fully understood the
bare minimum(the NEC) and work up from there to meet my day-to-day
living.

hth,

tom

  #5  
Old April 15th 05, 07:27 PM
William W. Plummer
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Posts: n/a
Default

Beeper wrote:
Pennsylvania has adopted a new state code this year. Not being a licensed
electrician in the state of Pa, Am I permitted to do the wiring of my newly
constructed home so long as I comply with all inspections?

Actually, nobody cares what you do to your house. Taking out a permit
gets an inspection done and takes away some of the risk. Your
insurance company will certainly care about your compliance with rules
after a fire or some damage is done!
  #6  
Old April 16th 05, 03:32 AM
Beeper
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks for the replies. Unfortunately, local goverment does not have any
answers as of yet either. I was under the impression that the state code
would eliminate one municipalitiy from making it's own rules to suit its
needs and also to eliminate less than standard work. As far as me not
knowing the codes because I can't answer my own question? Electrical codes
I'm ok with. Political codes are another thing. Thanks for the reply.
Insurance wise, I can go out and buy umpteen amounts of insurance to cover
my electrical work without even being an electrician or showing proof as
such.
"tm" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Beeper" wrote:

Pennsylvania has adopted a new state code this year. Not being a licensed
electrician in the state of Pa, Am I permitted to do the wiring of my
newly
constructed home so long as I comply with all inspections?


Beeper, I am trained usenet answer person. My magic eight balls says,
" Perhaps, check back later".

I am employed as an industrial electrician, Therefore I do not need to be
licensed at my job. If anything, what would I need to do, to do my own
home
wiring. Again, new construction.


Again, as a trained usenet answer person- buy oven mitts, the kind
with a metal facing on the palm. You can't go wrong wiring a house
wearing them.



  #7  
Old April 16th 05, 05:52 PM
The Real Tom
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 21:32:11 -0400, "Beeper"
wrote:

Thanks for the replies. Unfortunately, local goverment does not have any
answers as of yet either. I was under the impression that the state code


So, if your local codes aren't in effect you need to follow state
codes, and I am told PA still adopted 2002, and soon 2005NEC's will be
in effect in a few months. So follow the NEC.

would eliminate one municipalitiy from making it's own rules to suit its


NO. Nec can only be made more restrictive.

needs and also to eliminate less than standard work. As far as me not
knowing the codes because I can't answer my own question? Electrical codes
I'm ok with. Political codes are another thing. Thanks for the reply.
Insurance wise, I can go out and buy umpteen amounts of insurance to cover
my electrical work without even being an electrician or showing proof as
such.


Oh, sure they will take your money, but I really have concerns if they
will ever pay if it's work done by yourself, on your own house.

Good luck,and btw, if you have this many questions about codes, I
wouldn't do residential work. Get some training at your local votech,
so you better understand the codes.

imho,


tom


"tm" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Beeper" wrote:

Pennsylvania has adopted a new state code this year. Not being a licensed
electrician in the state of Pa, Am I permitted to do the wiring of my
newly
constructed home so long as I comply with all inspections?


Beeper, I am trained usenet answer person. My magic eight balls says,
" Perhaps, check back later".

I am employed as an industrial electrician, Therefore I do not need to be
licensed at my job. If anything, what would I need to do, to do my own
home
wiring. Again, new construction.


Again, as a trained usenet answer person- buy oven mitts, the kind
with a metal facing on the palm. You can't go wrong wiring a house
wearing them.



  #8  
Old April 16th 05, 11:55 PM
Beeper
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The only code I have a question with is whether I can wire my own house. Not
whether I am capable, but am I permitted by Pa. building codes. The NEC
doesn't tell you that. They are not concerned with that. My question
was...do you have to be a licensed electrician? Lets make it a simpler
question: When an electrical inspection occurs, does the inspector require
the "electrician" to supply proof of a license? Insurance?
"The Real Tom" tom @ www.Love-Calculators.com wrote in message
...
On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 21:32:11 -0400, "Beeper"
wrote:

Thanks for the replies. Unfortunately, local goverment does not have any
answers as of yet either. I was under the impression that the state code


So, if your local codes aren't in effect you need to follow state
codes, and I am told PA still adopted 2002, and soon 2005NEC's will be
in effect in a few months. So follow the NEC.

would eliminate one municipalitiy from making it's own rules to suit its


NO. Nec can only be made more restrictive.

needs and also to eliminate less than standard work. As far as me not
knowing the codes because I can't answer my own question? Electrical codes
I'm ok with. Political codes are another thing. Thanks for the reply.
Insurance wise, I can go out and buy umpteen amounts of insurance to cover
my electrical work without even being an electrician or showing proof as
such.


Oh, sure they will take your money, but I really have concerns if they
will ever pay if it's work done by yourself, on your own house.

Good luck,and btw, if you have this many questions about codes, I
wouldn't do residential work. Get some training at your local votech,
so you better understand the codes.

imho,


tom


"tm" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Beeper" wrote:

Pennsylvania has adopted a new state code this year. Not being a
licensed
electrician in the state of Pa, Am I permitted to do the wiring of my
newly
constructed home so long as I comply with all inspections?

Beeper, I am trained usenet answer person. My magic eight balls says,
" Perhaps, check back later".

I am employed as an industrial electrician, Therefore I do not need to
be
licensed at my job. If anything, what would I need to do, to do my own
home
wiring. Again, new construction.

Again, as a trained usenet answer person- buy oven mitts, the kind
with a metal facing on the palm. You can't go wrong wiring a house
wearing them.





  #9  
Old April 17th 05, 04:40 AM
Tom Horne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Beeper wrote:
"The Real Tom" tom @ www.Love-Calculators.com wrote in message
...

On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 21:32:11 -0400, "Beeper"
wrote:


Thanks for the replies. Unfortunately, local goverment does not have any
answers as of yet either. I was under the impression that the state code


So, if your local codes aren't in effect you need to follow state
codes, and I am told PA still adopted 2002, and soon 2005NEC's will be
in effect in a few months. So follow the NEC.


would eliminate one municipalitiy from making it's own rules to suit its


NO. Nec can only be made more restrictive.


needs and also to eliminate less than standard work. As far as me not
knowing the codes because I can't answer my own question? Electrical codes
I'm ok with. Political codes are another thing. Thanks for the reply.
Insurance wise, I can go out and buy umpteen amounts of insurance to cover
my electrical work without even being an electrician or showing proof as
such.


Oh, sure they will take your money, but I really have concerns if they
will ever pay if it's work done by yourself, on your own house.

Good luck,and btw, if you have this many questions about codes, I
wouldn't do residential work. Get some training at your local votech,
so you better understand the codes.

imho,


tom



"tm" wrote in message
...

In article ,
"Beeper" wrote:


Pennsylvania has adopted a new state code this year. Not being a
licensed
electrician in the state of Pa, Am I permitted to do the wiring of my
newly
constructed home so long as I comply with all inspections?

Beeper, I am trained usenet answer person. My magic eight balls says,
" Perhaps, check back later".


I am employed as an industrial electrician, Therefore I do not need to
be
licensed at my job. If anything, what would I need to do, to do my own
home
wiring. Again, new construction.

Again, as a trained usenet answer person- buy oven mitts, the kind
with a metal facing on the palm. You can't go wrong wiring a house
wearing them.

The only code I have a question with is whether I can wire my own house. Not
whether I am capable, but am I permitted by Pa. building codes. The NEC
doesn't tell you that. They are not concerned with that. My question
was...do you have to be a licensed electrician? Lets make it a simpler
question: When an electrical inspection occurs, does the inspector require
the "electrician" to supply proof of a license? Insurance?


The answer to your question can only be obtained locally. Call the code
enforcement office and ask them. Some jurisdictions will issue
electrical permits to homeowners and some will not. Of those that do
some require the homeowner to take a test. Unless someone answers up
from your own community the answers you will get here are useless.
--
Tom H
  #10  
Old April 17th 05, 05:26 PM
The Real Tom
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 16 Apr 2005 17:55:05 -0400, "Beeper"
wrote:

The only code I have a question with is whether I can wire my own house. Not
whether I am capable, but am I permitted by Pa. building codes. The NEC
doesn't tell you that. They are not concerned with that. My question


Ah yes it does. Look in Article 100 and definition for "Qualified
Person".

was...do you have to be a licensed electrician? Lets make it a simpler


Once again, Pa is a local jursidiction licensing state. If you have
no local licensing requirements, then you should have no license
requirements, from the government. I would how ever contact your
insurance carrier and find out their requirements.

question: When an electrical inspection occurs, does the inspector require


Having my work inspected, I've never been asked for proof of insurance
by the inspector. From the home owner, now that's a different story.


the "electrician" to supply proof of a license? Insurance?


Typically insurance is for protecting the customer, since you are the
customer, in this case, seems redundent to have to carry it.

Best thing for you to do, is get professional residential training.
Vo-tech teachers aren't really in it for the money, so buying a local
guy lunch will usually result in answering all your questions. Sure
you can ask here, but many of your answers are related to your
locality. But remember, as a bare minimim, use and comply with the
NEC, reguardless what you get in replies here.

hth,

tom @ www.WorkAtHomePlans.com






"The Real Tom" tom @ www.Love-Calculators.com wrote in message
.. .
On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 21:32:11 -0400, "Beeper"
wrote:

Thanks for the replies. Unfortunately, local goverment does not have any
answers as of yet either. I was under the impression that the state code


So, if your local codes aren't in effect you need to follow state
codes, and I am told PA still adopted 2002, and soon 2005NEC's will be
in effect in a few months. So follow the NEC.

would eliminate one municipalitiy from making it's own rules to suit its


NO. Nec can only be made more restrictive.

needs and also to eliminate less than standard work. As far as me not
knowing the codes because I can't answer my own question? Electrical codes
I'm ok with. Political codes are another thing. Thanks for the reply.
Insurance wise, I can go out and buy umpteen amounts of insurance to cover
my electrical work without even being an electrician or showing proof as
such.


Oh, sure they will take your money, but I really have concerns if they
will ever pay if it's work done by yourself, on your own house.

Good luck,and btw, if you have this many questions about codes, I
wouldn't do residential work. Get some training at your local votech,
so you better understand the codes.

imho,


tom


"tm" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Beeper" wrote:

Pennsylvania has adopted a new state code this year. Not being a
licensed
electrician in the state of Pa, Am I permitted to do the wiring of my
newly
constructed home so long as I comply with all inspections?

Beeper, I am trained usenet answer person. My magic eight balls says,
" Perhaps, check back later".

I am employed as an industrial electrician, Therefore I do not need to
be
licensed at my job. If anything, what would I need to do, to do my own
home
wiring. Again, new construction.

Again, as a trained usenet answer person- buy oven mitts, the kind
with a metal facing on the palm. You can't go wrong wiring a house
wearing them.




 




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