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Can copper pipes for water last more than 30 years?



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 21st 05, 12:40 AM
Tune Smith
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Default Can copper pipes for water last more than 30 years?

In Europe, they have 500-year old buildings. How long do water pipes
last there, and any methods for making water pipes last longer than 30
years?

What are the options (preferably less expensive) for "plumbing
problems" like leaks in a 30-year old building?

Should a second (or even third?) opinion be obtained before spending
$90,000 on pipe replacements?

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  #2  
Old January 21st 05, 03:14 AM
John A. Weeks III
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Default

In article .com,
"Tune Smith" wrote:

In Europe, they have 500-year old buildings. How long do water pipes
last there, and any methods for making water pipes last longer than 30
years?


The life of copper depends on the chemicals in the water
(stuff other than the H20 part). I have seen water in central
Wisconsin eat through a refrigerator ice maker water line in
just a few years (not that I would want to drink that water).

Copper is now going by the wayside for plumbing. The modern
stuff is called "PEX". It has been used in Europe for quite
a long time, and is now common in the US. It should be in
universal use in a few years. PEX appears to last a great
long time, decades, even in the most nasty water.

What are the options (preferably less expensive) for "plumbing
problems" like leaks in a 30-year old building?


PEX. I say that should go double in an older building since
you don't need to solder PEX plumbing, so there is far less
chance of setting the building on fire in the process.

Should a second (or even third?) opinion be obtained before spending
$90,000 on pipe replacements?


Yes. Anytime you spend $90K, you should have more than one
opinion.

-john-

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================================================== ====================
John A. Weeks III 952-432-2708
Newave Communications
http://www.johnweeks.com
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  #3  
Old January 21st 05, 12:28 PM
Travis Jordan
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Default


John A. Weeks III wrote:
/snip/
Copper is now going by the wayside for plumbing. The modern
stuff is called "PEX". It has been used in Europe for quite
a long time, and is now common in the US. It should be in
universal use in a few years. PEX appears to last a great
long time, decades, even in the most nasty water.


Decades? Pity the buyer of a 30 year home.


  #4  
Old January 21st 05, 09:20 PM
John A. Weeks III
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Default

In article ,
"Travis Jordan" wrote:

John A. Weeks III wrote:
/snip/
Copper is now going by the wayside for plumbing. The modern
stuff is called "PEX". It has been used in Europe for quite
a long time, and is now common in the US. It should be in
universal use in a few years. PEX appears to last a great
long time, decades, even in the most nasty water.


Decades? Pity the buyer of a 30 year home.


I said "decades" because PEX has only been around for 40 years,
and it hasn't worn out yet, so the don't know the real world
lifetime of the system yet. The only thing we do know is that
if you keep PEX out of UV light, it can last far longer than
copper. In contrast, I have seen copper wear out in as little
as 5 years.

-john-

--
================================================== ====================
John A. Weeks III 952-432-2708
Newave Communications
http://www.johnweeks.com
================================================== ====================
  #5  
Old January 21st 05, 10:08 PM
Andy Hill
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Default

"Tune Smith" wrote:
In Europe, they have 500-year old buildings. How long do water pipes
last there, and any methods for making water pipes last longer than 30
years?

Doubt too many of the 500 year-old-buildings came with indoor plumbing as
original equipment. For th first few hundred of those years "running water"
probably meant running out to the backyard or neighborhood well. And the
oldest plumbing was usually lead pipes...that's got its own set of problems...

What are the options (preferably less expensive) for "plumbing
problems" like leaks in a 30-year old building?

Depends on the cause. If the water is real corrosive, fixing the current leaks
and putting in some sort of whole-building treatment dingus might be cheaper
than the $90K quoted. Depends on how thin the pipes have gotten.

Should a second (or even third?) opinion be obtained before spending
$90,000 on pipe replacements?

For that kind of money, I'd want lots and lots of opinions.
 




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