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Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

"Heat Sink Putty" ?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 2nd 08, 11:46 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default "Heat Sink Putty" ?

Any such thing?

I'll have a little bridge rectifier and voltage regulator serving
a bicycle hub alternator (6v 4w) and want to use the bike frame
as the heat sink.

My thought was that, if there's such a thing as heat-conductive
putty, I'd just embed the two components in some of it and stick
it to a frame tube.
--
PeteCresswell
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  #2  
Old March 3rd 08, 12:21 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Posts: 3,752
Default "Heat Sink Putty" ?

I've never heard of putty. Silicone grease is common, of course.


  #3  
Old March 3rd 08, 12:26 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Posts: 2,770
Default "Heat Sink Putty" ?



"(PeteCresswell)" wrote:

Any such thing?

I'll have a little bridge rectifier and voltage regulator serving
a bicycle hub alternator (6v 4w) and want to use the bike frame
as the heat sink.

My thought was that, if there's such a thing as heat-conductive
putty, I'd just embed the two components in some of it and stick
it to a frame tube.


Aluminium powder mixed with epoxy might work.

Graham

  #4  
Old March 3rd 08, 02:26 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Posts: 56
Default "Heat Sink Putty" ?


"(PeteCresswell)" wrote in message
...
Any such thing?

I'll have a little bridge rectifier and voltage regulator serving
a bicycle hub alternator (6v 4w) and want to use the bike frame
as the heat sink.

My thought was that, if there's such a thing as heat-conductive
putty, I'd just embed the two components in some of it and stick
it to a frame tube.


**Do you need heat sinking? 4 Watts is not much power. You could use a 6 Amp
bridge, which can dissipate quite a bit of power, before requiring any heat
sink. If you do need it, then use silicon glue (the stuff used for
guttering, kitchens, bathrooms, etc). It remains flexible and will transfer
reasonable heat to the frame. I seriously doubt that you need it though.

Trevor Wilson


  #5  
Old March 3rd 08, 02:36 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Posts: 5,054
Default "Heat Sink Putty" ?

In article ,
Eeyore wrote:

"(PeteCresswell)" wrote:

Any such thing?

I'll have a little bridge rectifier and voltage regulator serving
a bicycle hub alternator (6v 4w) and want to use the bike frame
as the heat sink.

My thought was that, if there's such a thing as heat-conductive
putty, I'd just embed the two components in some of it and stick
it to a frame tube.


Aluminium powder mixed with epoxy might work.

Graham


Don't they make thermally conductive epoxy? OP might not want anything
electrically conductive.
  #6  
Old March 3rd 08, 01:55 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Posts: 743
Default "Heat Sink Putty" ?

In article , "(PeteCresswell)" wrote:
Any such thing?

I'll have a little bridge rectifier and voltage regulator serving
a bicycle hub alternator (6v 4w) and want to use the bike frame
as the heat sink.

My thought was that, if there's such a thing as heat-conductive
putty, I'd just embed the two components in some of it and stick
it to a frame tube.


Thermal epoxy is better than regular epoxy but the conductivity
is very poor compared to copper, and copper is poor compared to diamond.
Might try the suggestion of adding metal filings to regular epoxy putty.
Thermal epoxy is not really putty.

greg
  #8  
Old March 3rd 08, 02:15 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Posts: 1,253
Default "Heat Sink Putty" ?

On Sun, 02 Mar 2008 18:36:38 -0800, Smitty Two
wrote:

In article ,
Eeyore wrote:

"(PeteCresswell)" wrote:

Any such thing?

I'll have a little bridge rectifier and voltage regulator serving
a bicycle hub alternator (6v 4w) and want to use the bike frame
as the heat sink.

My thought was that, if there's such a thing as heat-conductive
putty, I'd just embed the two components in some of it and stick
it to a frame tube.


Aluminium powder mixed with epoxy might work.

Graham


Don't they make thermally conductive epoxy? OP might not want anything
electrically conductive.


Then use zinc oxide with epoxy, that should not be conductive... But
regardless, nothing will work very well, IMHO...
  #9  
Old March 3rd 08, 03:19 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Posts: 743
Default "Heat Sink Putty" ?

In article , PeterD wrote:
On Sun, 02 Mar 2008 18:36:38 -0800, Smitty Two
wrote:

In article ,
Eeyore wrote:

"(PeteCresswell)" wrote:

Any such thing?

I'll have a little bridge rectifier and voltage regulator serving
a bicycle hub alternator (6v 4w) and want to use the bike frame
as the heat sink.

My thought was that, if there's such a thing as heat-conductive
putty, I'd just embed the two components in some of it and stick
it to a frame tube.

Aluminium powder mixed with epoxy might work.

Graham


Don't they make thermally conductive epoxy? OP might not want anything
electrically conductive.


Then use zinc oxide with epoxy, that should not be conductive... But
regardless, nothing will work very well, IMHO...


Seems like there are atachments to the frame for accesories, and if they
are aluminum, it will make a great way to do it. Curved surface aluminum
block.

greg
 




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